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With a long tradition of honoring the military, History is launching a campaign to recognize veterans that features public service announcements with big stars over Memorial Day weekend. Public service announcements feature Matthew McConaughey, Kevin Bacon, Olivia Munn, Russell Wilson, Ciara, Toby ...

PSA campaign coincides with season 2 premiere of 'Six'

With a long tradition of honoring the military, History is launching a campaign to recognize veterans that features public service announcements with big stars over Memorial Day weekend.

Public service announcements feature Matthew McConaughey, Kevin Bacon, Olivia Munn, Russell Wilson, Ciara, Toby Keith, Simone Biles, Bill Goldberg and Tom Selleck.

The start of the campaign coincides with the season 2 premiere of Six, a Special Forces drama created by former military personnel. Munn is one of the stars of Six.

History's "Six"

History is also working with a number of veterans’ organizations including Flags and Flowers, started by 12-year-old California student Patrick Sharp, which places flowers and flags on the graves of servicemen.

The first spot cuts from star to star as they deliver their message. “Our military veterans fought to protect our rights liberties and freedom. Let’s all thank our veterans, along with our active military men and women, by honoring their patriotism, their service and their many contributions to our country. Because whether we are athletes, musicians, gymnasts wrestlers, actors, veterans, we all support these heroes. We salute you and we thank you,” the spot says.

The spot ends with a call to action: “Get Involved Now, Go to Veterans.com.” Veterans.com is a website owned by History that features information about veterans, about the series Six, and links to several groups dedicated to helping veterans and military families.

History’s Star-Studded Tribute to Vets Launches Memorial Day (; 0:30)

“Honoring our veterans, active military and their families has been a cornerstone of History since we launched in 1995,” said Paul Buccieri, president A+E Studios and A+E Networks Portfolio Group. “We are proud to support and highlight the extraordinary contributions of veterans and military families through our programming and our outreach initiatives, not just on holidays, but every day.”

The campaign is expected to run year round, with ads airing on History and the other networks owned by A+E, as well as its digital platforms.

In addition to the celebrity studded PSA, History was able to shoot spots when it hosted a Flags and Flowers event with Sharp at Los Angeles National Cemetery on May 18 that featured the cast of Six including Barry Sloane, Kyle Schmid, Juan Pablo Raba, Dominic Adams, Jaylen Moore and Nikolai Nikolaeff.

History couldn’t provide a value for the airtime it would use to air the PSAs. The company also backs veterans groups, including TAPS, Team Rubicon, The Mission Continues, Headstrong, America’s VetDogs, but it views its main contribution as helping to raise visibility for veterans programs.

“It’s amazing to me that unless you’re a military family how you can almost forget there are people in harm’s way on behalf of this country and doing what they’re asked to do,” said Arturo Interian, senior VP for scripted series at History.

“So just as a reminder, there’s guys in Syria, there’s guys in Afghanistan, there are men and women in Iraq who are fighting a fight that we’ve asked them to fight. Their families are sacrificing. Just be aware and thank them and be aware of the past generations that have served and done what they’ve been called to do,” Interian said.

History worked hard to get the high-profile stars to speak out for veterans. Some have been involved in veterans’ projects before. Others have family connections to the military.

“It’s amazing the cross section of entertainment and athletics and music that has come out to support this,” said Kim Gilmore, senior historian and director of corporate outreach at History.

“One of the other messages that’s important to us is the idea that we know there are a lot of divisions in our country politically on all the different levels, but this is something that should unite us,” Gilmore said. “No matter what we think about the different conflicts, we should be able to unite around support for veterans and military families.”

Interian says he comes from a military family and that working on this campaign is one of the things he’s proudest of while working at History.

“My dad was in the Army. My great-uncle was in Vietnam, my grandfather and my great uncles all fought in World War II, so when you take the time to honor and remember both living and past, it’s a big deal to me and it’s one of the highest callings you can be called on to do in this country,” he said.

“So yes, we run military documentaries, we run military shows and that’s great, but these are very important groups doing a lot of good work that we’re partnered with. I’m very proud of that.”

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: May 25, 2018, 8:08 pm
Public Knowledge says it does not think transferring E.U. privacy rules to the U.S. is the right way to go. With the European Union's tough new General Data Protection Regulation online privacy framework taking effect Friday (May 25), there had been calls for U.S. policymakers to adopt those rules ...

But says Congress should look at GDPR as it comes up with its own privacy regime

Public Knowledge says it does not think transferring E.U. privacy rules to the U.S. is the right way to go.

With the European Union's tough new General Data Protection Regulation online privacy framework taking effect Friday (May 25), there had been calls for U.S. policymakers to adopt those rules here, or for companies to voluntarily do so.

Related: Twitter Shuts Down TV Apps

Public Knowledge is all for protecting online user's privacy, including using government levers to ensure that, particularly given various data breaches and privacy violations that have been much in the news lately, but not by grafting the E.U. regime on the U.S. 

Gus Rossi, global policy director for Public Knowledge, says the E.U. effort has spotlighted the deficiencies of the U.S. patchwork of protections, but that "copying and pasting E.U. law would not be an efficient or reasonable way to protect Americans’ privacy," adding that the institutions, legal systems, and consumer preferences are just too different."

What should happen, he says, is that Congress should study the GDPR as it comes up with its own "American" privacy bill. 

One issue with that, however, is that American companies doing business globally, which is most big layers, will still have to comply with the E.U. regulations, so where those don't rack with U.S. regs, the companies must provide bifurcated services. 

Whatever the bill does, at baseline it should "encourage companies to rethink their data collection and processing practices to guarantee security of user information, require meaningful notice and consent for personal data sharing, list user rights, and designate at least one independent enforcement agency," he said.

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 25, 2018, 5:55 pm
With the European Union's tough new online privacy framework taking effect Friday (May 25), websites were warning users that they would have to provide their consent for data use in order to use the service. Wrong move, said a privacy group. Following those pop-warnings, privacy activist group ...

With new GDPR framework only hours old, Google, Facebook among sites cited

With the European Union's tough new online privacy framework taking effect Friday (May 25), websites were warning users that they would have to provide their consent for data use in order to use the service. Wrong move, said a privacy group.

Following those pop-warnings, privacy activist group noyb.eu proceeded to file complaints against Google (Android), Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram over what it said was “forced consent."

Related: Twitter, Yahoo! Adjusting Terms of Service

The group, the NOYB – European Center for Digital Rights (the "noyb" stands for "none of your business"), said the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) prohibits such forced consent, so that for companies doing business in the EU "access to services can no longer depend on whether a user gives consent to the use of data"--theoretically, it would seem, even if the service's free-to-web-surfers business model depended on its users allowing them to monetize that data via advertising and marketing.

"With [these complaints] we want to ensure that GDPR is implemented in a sane way: Without just moving towards 'fishing for consent,'" noyb.eu said.

Given that the penalty for violating the new rules could be 4% of a company's global revenue, were Google and Amazon to be dinged, they could owe more than a billion Euros, the group said. "Currently we do not expect that DPAs will use the full penalty powers," said the group. "but we would expect a reasonable penalty, given the obvious violation."

Noyb.eu said if its complaint succeeds, it could be the end of those "annoying and obtrusive" pop-up consent boxes.

To get a sense of what the GDPR is and means, check out this panel session sponsored by the congressional caucus focused on internet issues:

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 25, 2018, 5:19 pm
ABC landed the top spot in Thursday prime ratings, as the special The Last Days of Michael Jackson led the net to a 0.9 rating in viewers 18-49 and a 4 share. That topped the 0.7/3 that both CBS and NBC posted. The Michael Jackson special did a 0.9 and What Would You Do? rated a 0.8 at 10 p.m., up ...

Red Nose Day sees NBC tied for second

ABC landed the top spot in Thursday prime ratings, as the special The Last Days of Michael Jackson led the net to a 0.9 rating in viewers 18-49 and a 4 share. That topped the 0.7/3 that both CBS and NBC posted.

The Michael Jackson special did a 0.9 and What Would You Do? rated a 0.8 at 10 p.m., up 33% from its premiere.

CBS had repeats throughout prime.

NBC celebrated Red Nose Day. The network had both Celebrity Ninja Warrior and Hollywood Game Night at 0.8, then the Red Nose Day special at 0.5.

Fox did a 0.5/2, with the special Terrence Howard’s Fright Club at 0.5 and the Showtime at the Apollo finale at a flat 0.6.

Telemundo and Univision both scored a 0.4/2.

The CW was at 0.2/1 with repeats.

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: May 25, 2018, 4:29 pm
The U.S. government has taken another step in its official shunning of Chinese telecoms Huawei and ZTE, with the House voting to exclude them and their technology from government contracts and systems, though the prohibition will take several years to effectuate. The technology includes everything ...

Would be phased in over several years

The U.S. government has taken another step in its official shunning of Chinese telecoms Huawei and ZTE, with the House voting to exclude them and their technology from government contracts and systems, though the prohibition will take several years to effectuate.

The technology includes everything from phones, tablets and smart watches to mobile hot spots, broadband routers, switches and servers. 

Existing components from the companies would not have to be removed, but when their natural lifecycle ends, they would have to be replaced with a comparable piece of equipment "manufactured by a person other than Huawei Technologies Company or ZTE Corporation (or any subsidiary, successor entity, or affiliate of such entities)."

Related: House Looks at Supply Chain Security

The exclusion provision was part of the massive defense appropriations bill HR 5515, the National Defense Authorization Act for 2019, which passed overwhelmingly (351 to 66), but must still be reconciled with the Senate version, where Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) proposed the prohibition. 

The bill said that given that Chinese telecoms are among companies that claim to be private but are subject to state influence, and given that the former head of the CIA had said Huawei had shared its "intimate and extensive knowledge" of foreign telecommunications systems with which it was involved with the Chinese government, and given that ZTE had pled guilty to illegally shipping U.S. origin items to Iran, and given that a bipartisan select committee in 2012 had recommended that U.S. government systems should not include ZTE or Huawei equipment, and given that the heads of the U.S. intelligence agencies recently told Congress they would not use products or services from either company, it was drawing a line in the digital sand, as it were.

Referring specifically to Huawei and ZTE, the bill said that, as of January 2021: "[T]he head of an agency may not procure or obtain, may not extend or renew a contract to procure or obtain, and may not enter into a contract (or extend or renew a contract) with an entity that uses any equipment, system, or service that uses covered telecommunications equipment or services as a substantial or essential component of any system, or as critical technology as part of any system."

Related: Rubio Praises Ban of Tech from Bases

But in addition to the the two-and-a-half-year glide path, there is also an added two-year waiver for compelling reasons.

The Consumer Technology Association had no comment on the prohibition, with a spokesperson saying that the association was "neutral" on procurement issues.

ZTE and Huawei have been the subjects of numerous government actions of late, including an FCC proposal to prohibit broadband subsidy money to be used for its equipment, a prohibition on ZTE or Huawei devices from military bases, and then there was Commerce Department officials concluding ZTE violated the terms of its settlement agreement with the U.S. over illegally shipping telecom equipment to Iran and North Korea and declaring that U.S. companies would be prohibited from exporting technology to ZTE that was then being incorporated in their products for re-export to Iran and North Korea.

On the other side, President Trump tweeted that he had asked Commerce to help ZTE, pointing to potential job losses in China (from the fallout from Commerce's actions).

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 25, 2018, 3:52 pm
Ben Tracy, foreign correspondent at CBS News, offered a rare perspective on the ongoing drama involving the U.S. and North Korea. Based in Beijing, Tracy was in North Korea to witness what the North Koreans claim is the destruction of their main nuclear testing site. Tracy said CBS News and CNN ...

Correspondent there to witness nuclear testing site, or at least part of it, getting blown up

Ben Tracy, foreign correspondent at CBS News, offered a rare perspective on the ongoing drama involving the U.S. and North Korea. Based in Beijing, Tracy was in North Korea to witness what the North Koreans claim is the destruction of their main nuclear testing site. Tracy said CBS News and CNN were the only U.S. media there to witness the demolition.

“North Korea does not invite journalists to the country often,” he told B&C, adding that CBS News regularly asks to enter, presumably putting it higher on the list when North Korea wanted to spread the word of its site demolition.

Tracy said about 20 media personnel were in the country for the testing site bombing. They got to the site after an 11-hour train ride, a 1 ½ hour drive, and a hike to Punggye-ri.

Related: CBS News Names Brinda Adhikari Senior Broadcast Producer, 'CBS Evening News With Jeff Glor'

The North Koreans strung explosives inside the site’s three tunnels, which they showed the journalists, then moved the media to a viewing stand to watch the explosion, and finally brought the reporters back to the entrances to see the damage.

Few print outlets were invited to the spectacle, Tracy said, North Korea seeing it as “a made for TV event,” with the explosions playing better in video than in print.

Reporting on CBS Evening News Thursday, Tracy said, “The problem is, this is a group of journalists. Nobody there is a nuclear expert, so we have no way of knowing if what they did in front of us actually does render that site completely unusable or if it simply just destroyed the entrances to these tunnels that could then eventually be fixed.”

President Trump canceled the planned June 12 summit with Kim Jong-un.

Tracy said on the newscast of North Korea’s reaction, “They will likely react with some form of anger, disappointment. You can expect them likely to blame the U.S. for a breakdown in diplomacy here on the Korean Peninsula, and if they wanted to, this could be an excuse to backtrack on some of the promises they've recently made with South Korea. So, there could be some lasting impacts here depending on how North Korea wants to play this.”

North Korea could also take the high ground, he added. 

CBS News’ boots-on-the-ground coverage from North Korea follows the division’s recent reports from Israel and Syria. CBS Evening News anchor Jeff Glor was in Israel for the opening of the U.S. embassy in Jerusalem, and went to Ramallah to cover the battles in the West Bank.

CBS News Foreign Correspondent Seth Doane was the only U.S. network reporter in Syria, says CBS News, for the U.S. missile strike there last month.

It is Tracy’s second time in North Korea, the first being last year, when he witnessed a military parade in Pyongyang. He departs the morning of May 26. No government officials were made available to comment on the developing diplomacy between North Korea and the U.S., but Tracy said the government minders accompanying the journalists were helpful, and full of questions about the U.S.’s wishes in North Korea. “They were very nice to us,” he said.

So why is North Korea so intent on working out a positive relationship with America? Tracy said the country, seeing itself as a legitimate military threat to the U.S. and Korea, would prefer to focus more on its ailing economy right now than escalating its weaponry.

Tracy did get a glimpse at the small towns of North Korea as the interminable train ride hurtled to the northern edge of the nation. He, and his fellow reporters, were also treated to a 10-course meal served by white tuxedoed waiters.

“It’s probably the most surreal assignment we’ve been on,” he said.

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: May 25, 2018, 3:22 pm
Keith Olbermann, an early ESPN star who has returned to the network, is getting an expanded role with the sports giant. Olbermann will continue to develop regular features for SportsCenter, ESPN said. He will also be making appearances on PTI and Outside the Lines. Olbermann will do play-by-play ...

Anchor will work on more studio shows, baseball games

Keith Olbermann, an early ESPN star who has returned to the network, is getting an expanded role with the sports giant.

Olbermann will continue to develop regular features for SportsCenter, ESPN said. He will also be making appearances on PTI and Outside the Lines.

Olbermann will do play-by-play for a few of ESPN baseball telecasts and will host some editiions of Baseball Tonight. He will be at the MLB All Star Game, playoffs and World Series, creating segments for SportsCenter.

Related: UFC Moving to ESPN From Fox in Deal Valued at $1.5B

Keith Olbermann

The anchor will also make appearances as a guest host and call-in guest on ESPN radio shows. Olbermann will be calling the radio play-by-play with analyst Jim Bowden for Astros at Yankees on Memorial Day.

“Keith’s smart, creative perspective on the world of sports always informs and entertains fans,” Williamson said. “His varied collection of ESPN appearances over the last several months has provided a great model for utilizing his distinctive voice and this new agreement will extend his contributions even further,” said Norby Williamson, executive VP, production and managing editor at ESPN.

For ESPN, Olbermann is a link to the days when the network dominated the sports landscape. In recent years, ESPN has been better known for losing subscribers, falling profits and layoffs. ESPN recently got a new president in Jimmy Pitaro and has launched a high-profile direct-to-consumer product, ESPN+, in order to appeal to over-the-top viewers and offset the damage being done by cord-cutting.

Olbermann’s lastest stint with ESPN started in January. He hosted Olbermann from 2013 to 2015 on ESPN2 and was a SportsCenter anchor from 1992 to 1997. In between he had stints doing news and sports on MSNBC and Fox News.

“Since we started this, my 6th separate tenure with ESPN, in January, I’ve found the variety of assignments to be most the fun and energizing of all my stints,” Obermann said. “Adding stuff like being a rookie 59-year old play-by-play guy, plus the Rip Van Winkle of SportsCenter, only adds to the smorgasbord. Can’t wait, and at my age, I shouldn’t.”

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: May 25, 2018, 3:06 pm
Republican FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr signaled this week he thought reports of the impending death of the internet were highly overrated. In an interview for C-SPAN's Communicators series, Carr said that on June 11, when the FCC's network neutrality regulation rollback takes effect, consumers ...

Says biggest change will be more investment in deployment

Republican FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr signaled this week he thought reports of the impending death of the internet were highly overrated.

In an interview for C-SPAN's Communicators series, Carr said that on June 11, when the FCC's network neutrality regulation rollback takes effect, consumers "are not going to see the end of the internet" and "in fact, are going back to the same regime we had in 2015 and for 20 years before that."

He said it was a return to a "tried and true" framework. Asked if the FCC "washes its hands" of net neutrality and deeds it to the FTC, Carr said no, pointing to the transparency rule, which requires broadband providers tell the FCC how they are managing the network, then the FTC can identify any consumer harm.

Related: Network Neutrality Rollback Effective June 11

Championing the argument of ISPs against the former Title II-based, bright-line rules--that they discouraged network buildouts--Carr said he thought that the only difference consumers would notice post-June 11 was increased investment in broadband deployment, which is a key policy goal for Republicans and Democrats.

Carr said that when he gets out of D.C., what he hears is that people want better, faster, cheaper broadband, and more choice.

While there have been lawsuits to block the reg rollback, and the Senate has voted to roll back the rollback using a Congressional Review Act resolution, there is a lot of common ground that has been lost in all the "D.C.-based debate." That common ground is on "no blocking, no discrimination, no broken promises" and that the focus should be on stand-alone legislation that does just that.

Republicans have proposed bills that prevent blocking and throttling (the House) and blocking, throttling and paid prioritization (the Senate). But Democrats still want a Title II basis for rules, something Republicans won't accept, and the Democrats who might accept something less than Title II see the bills as still too limiting on the FCC's broadband regulatory authority, or they may not be in a hurry to compromise with Republicans before an election in which they could use net neutrality as an issue to unseat them.

Carr said trying to put Title II back on the internet is the wrong approach. He said while there was room for disagreement over Title II versus Title I and that reasonable minds could disagree, what people outside Washington really want is more competition and choice in broadband.

Carr, who has been given the task by Chairman Ajit Pai of motormanning its wireless infrastructure proceeding, said that the government's historic approach to deployment assumed everything was a "big, macro" tower, rather than the small cells that will be driving 5G. Those small cells can "flip the business case" he said for some areas of the country to build out wireless. The FCC is trying to make it easier to flip by speeding tower siting and permitting.

Carr said he thought the FCC had pretty broad preemption powers over state and local laws that impeded the deployment of advanced communications, adding that it was up to the FCC to interpret congressional guidance in this area to "make sure that they still make sense in light of the modern technological deployments, so this is an area where we do have a significant amount of authority."

Carr said he expected some pushback from states and localities, but also pointed to almost two dozen states that had passed "forward thinking" small cell legislation.

It is important to beat China to 5G, the commissioner said, because it would take $275 billion in capital to build it out, and money flowed to countries with "5G ready" regulatory structures."

Carr agreed that he could see the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR), which go into effect Friday (May 25), being adopted in the U.S., but also that one of the things that rolling back Title II does is return privacy oversight of ISPs to the FTC, which already oversees edge privacy, so that agency can take a "holistic look" at U.S. privacy protections.

Carr would not weigh in on the proposed Sprint-T-Mobile merger in particular, or whether it was in the public interest to go from four to three major wireless carriers. 

The Carr interview airs Saturday, May 26, at 6:30 p.m. on C-SPAN and Monday, May 28, at 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. on C-SPAN2.

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 25, 2018, 2:58 pm
Rich Zwiebel, AIMS Install Working Group Chair, to Lead Seminar on Implementing Interoperability Standards for IP Audio and Video BOTHELL, Wash. — May 25, 2018 — As part of its promotion of a standards-based approach for the adoption of IP audio and video, the Alliance for IP Media Solutions (AIMS) ...

Rich Zwiebel, AIMS Install Working Group Chair, to Lead Seminar on Implementing Interoperability Standards for IP Audio and Video

BOTHELL, Wash.May 25, 2018 — As part of its promotion of a standards-based approach for the adoption of IP audio and video, the Alliance for IP Media Solutions (AIMS) today announced that AIMS’ Install Working Group Chair, Rich Zwiebel, will lead a seminar at InfoComm 2018 titled “Interoperability Standards for IP-Based Audio and Video.”

The seminar is designed to give attendees a clear understanding of how to use standards in their products, designs, and systems. The session will include a technical discussion of AIMS-endorsed standards, specifically AES67 and SMPTE ST 2110.

The two-hour seminar will begin at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, June 5, at the Westgate Hotel Las Vegas in Pavilion 10.

Rich Zwiebel is currently the chair of the AIMS Install Working Group and is V.P. of Systems Strategy at QSC Audio. He formerly served as chairman of the Media Networking Alliance (MNA) before MNA’s merger with AIMS earlier this year. The merger combined both organizations’ years of work related to the adoption of AES67. The MNA had been supporting AV network interoperability via the use of AES67 in the install and live systems markets, while AIMS had been doing similar work as part of its promotion of IP-based video standards in the media and entertainment industry. The merger of the two organizations, known collectively as AIMS resulted in the formation of one entity promoting interoperable IP audio and video solutions.

“AIMS is devoted to fostering the adoption of recognized standards. With the ratification of SMPTE ST 2110, it’s more important than ever to understand how all the standards work together and how best to implement them,” said Michael Cronk, AIMS board chair. “We encourage anyone investigating or responsible for transporting audio and video over networks — whether an engineer or a networking professional — to attend this session and learn more about building solutions for a successful transition to IP.”

In addition to the seminar, on Wednesday, June 6, AIMS will host a reception for members, the press, and anyone interested in interoperability standards for IP. The reception will be held at the Las Vegas Convention Center in Room N250 at 5:30 p.m.

InfoComm 2018 will take place June 2-8 in Las Vegas.

# # #

About the Alliance for IP Media Solutions
The Alliance for IP Media Solutions (AIMS) is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to the education, awareness, and promotion of industry standards for the transmission of video, audio, and ancillary information over an IP infrastructure, as well as products based on those standards. The group represents the interests of both broadcast and media companies and technology suppliers that share a commitment to facilitating the industry’s transition from SDI to IP through industry standards and interoperable solutions that enable the rapid evolution to open, agile, and versatile production environments.

Link to Word Doc: www.wallstcom.com/AIMS/180525AIMS.docx 

Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: May 25, 2018, 2:50 pm
NBC will air Hair Live! in the spring of 2019, the telecast shot in front of a live audience. Craig Zadan and Neil Meron, who have executive produced each of NBC’s live musicals since The Sound of Music in late 2013, will executive produce the event. Hair arrived on Broadway 50 years ago. With ...

Craig Zadan, Neil Meron, Mark Burnett bring live stage production to network 50 years after show’s Broadway debut

NBC will air Hair Live! in the spring of 2019, the telecast shot in front of a live audience. Craig Zadan and Neil Meron, who have executive produced each of NBC’s live musicals since The Sound of Music in late 2013, will executive produce the event.

Hair arrived on Broadway 50 years ago. With music by Galt MacDermot and book and lyrics by Gerome Ragni and James Rado, the Hair hits include “(The Age of) Aquarius,” “Let the Sun Shine In,” Good Morning Starshine” and “Manchester, England.”

Hair Live! will be produced by Universal Television, MGM Television, and Zadan/Meron Productions.

Related: NBC Claims Season Title in Viewers 18-49

“I’m overjoyed that James Rado and Galt MacDermot are trusting us with their masterpiece Hair, one of the most original shows ever conceived for Broadway with one of the greatest scores,” said Robert Greenblatt, chairman, NBC Entertainment. “These songs are part of the vocabulary of popular music, and this rebellious story of young people protesting and standing up for what they believe in is as relevant today as it was 50 years ago. This will be the perfect live event, and I’m looking forward to seeing Craig and Neil, along with our partners at MGM and the original creators bring the audience to their feet as they experience these beloved songs and recognizable young characters.”

Hair Live! tells the story of a group of politically active hippies living a bohemian life in New York while fighting against the Vietnam War. Claude, his good friends Berger and Sheila, and their “tribe” are coming of age amidst sexual revolution while struggling with their rebellion against the war and their conservative parents. Claude must decide whether to resist the draft or serve in Vietnam. 

Related: Broadcast Nets Hustle to Avoid Being Upfront Weak

"When we both, individually, saw Hair on Broadway, we were knocked out by how musical theater could be stretched into something so daring, immersive and audacious,” said Zadan and Meron. "Its recent Broadway revival showed how timeless the show is and that it's relevant to any era. Hair is filled with heartfelt emotion, joy and thrilling music and it really will be the new dawning of the Age of Aquarius."

After an off-Broadway debut in 1967 at the Public Theater, Hair opened on Broadway in April 1968 and ran for 1,750 performances.

In 2008, it returned to Broadway.

“We are thrilled to continue to work with Bob Greenblatt, NBC and now with Neil and Craig, who are the two absolute geniuses in the musical theater space,” said Mark Burnett, president, MGM Television Group. “Hair has become such an iconic film in our culture, and now on its 50th anniversary it’s the ideal time to perform it live on television.”

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: May 25, 2018, 2:17 pm
Weybridge, UK, May 24, 2018 – Pebble Beach Systems, a leading automation, content management and integrated channel specialist, today announced that TV Cultura, Brazil’s award-winning public television broadcaster, is migrating its playout operations to Pebble Beach Systems’ Marina Lite automation ...

Weybridge, UK, May 24, 2018 – Pebble Beach Systems, a leading automation, content management and integrated channel specialist, today announced that TV Cultura, Brazil’s award-winning public television broadcaster, is migrating its playout operations to Pebble Beach Systems’ Marina Lite automation solution.

TV Cultura has four main channels featuring national and regional news, cultural programming, music, children’s programs and documentaries. It also delivers web-based channels, and broadcasts educational content from São Paulo State Virtual University. All channels are accessible by over 126 million viewers across Brazil.

Upholding its reputation for excellence and continuous innovation, TV Cultura recently invested in the modernization of the equipment and infrastructure of its broadcast operations. Having initially deployed a Pebble Beach Systems Neptune playout automation solution over 10 years ago, TV Cultura is working with São Paolo based systems integrator Videodata to ensure the successful migration to a modern Marina Lite 4R automation system with a Lighthouse web-based remote management and monitoring dashboard.

Videodata put in place a flexible but intelligent migration strategy to Marina which is designed to cause little or no disruption to the TV Cultura’s operations, with the broadcaster’s existing Neptune database being seamlessly migrated onto the new platform. Furthermore, because Neptune playlists can be natively opened in Marina, and both Neptune and Marina can talk to the same Archive and NLS in parallel, operators are able to carry on working as usual with no disruption and minimal training throughout the migration process.

The facility has two master control rooms, each operating two channels and four GV Maestro Master Switchers, GV K2 Video Servers and a Jupiter Router. Marina will also control the ingest workflow for TV Cultura, and the system is designed with full redundancy for automation, playout, and the database. In addition to delivering improved integration with the traffic system, this migration will streamline their approvals workflows and media management, as well as their closed caption and web workflows. In addition, Marina will deliver greater flexibility for the operators in terms of layout creation and provide detailed reporting and logging for every device and user.

“TV Cultura has long had a reputation for being a broadcast pioneer and we are constantly looking for ways to improve our facilities and workflows in ways that make sense for the long term,” explained Gilvani Moletta, engineering and technology director at TV Cultura. “Our Neptune automation system has served us very well over the last decade, so upgrading to the more modern Marina was a no-brainer. Not only is the transition seamless but we are also confident that the technology is the right one to help us grow and help us face the challenges of the next decade and beyond.”

With Lighthouse, TV Cultura will extend Marina’s functionality to business users, operational staff and engineers both inside and outside the facility. The web-based interface will give them monitoring, media management, and system configuration tools so that status information and corrective actions are just seconds away, even when they are outside the control room.

“TV Cultura was one of our first Pebble customers in Latin America,” said Marcelo Blum, Systems and Technology Manager at Videodata. It’s always a rewarding experience to work with a such a forward-thinking customer over a long period of time and help them evolve and upgrade their technology without any major disruption to their workflow.”

“Our Marina Lite system is proving to be popular in Latin America where it is being used to provide playout automation and master control for customers who are upgrading or replacing their first-generation platforms. It offers an affordable solution for customers who are looking for a robust, resilient and sophisticated playlist control system that can grow with their operational needs and budgets. We are delighted that TV Cultura has once again chosen to place their trust in Pebble and we look forward to supporting their continued growth for years to come,” added Tom Gittins, Chief Commercial Officer at Pebble Beach Systems. 

Author: kristi@highrezpr.com
Posted: May 25, 2018, 12:36 pm
Nevada City, California, May 24, 2018 – In broadcasting, cloud-based workflows have been in vogue for a number of years, and many technology companies are focusing so strongly on cloud deployments that it almost seems that the answer is cloud, but no one is sure of the question! The $64 million ...

Nevada City, California, May 24, 2018 – In broadcasting, cloud-based workflows have been in vogue for a number of years, and many technology companies are focusing so strongly on cloud deployments that it almost seems that the answer is cloud, but no one is sure of the question! The $64 million question for the broadcast industry is: how cloud should figure in to the future?

According to Telestream’s Chief Marketing Officer, Chris Osika, very often the answer is not found in pure cloud. Whilst he sees cloud as an empowering technology for organizations of all sizes and in many different industry sectors, there is an absolute need for it to be employed strategically and judiciously based on real business need.

“Today, the cloud continues to evolve as companies’ use of it evolves. Workloads such as disaster recovery, HR, CRM are ‘no-brainers’ for cloud deployment,” Osika comments. “One of the key advantages of cloud is its ability to let entrepreneurial organizations match revenues to expenses and hence allow them to be more success-based in their growth.

“At Telestream, we see numerous core broadcast workflows that don’t transfer easily to the cloud, such as live transcoding workflows. At the current stage of cloud’s evolution these are not optimized within cloud-based environments. We believe that working in a hybrid environment leads to a more efficiently optimized infrastructure environment,” he affirms.

Broadcast under siege
Today, broadcasters are under siege from agile competitors such as online video providers, who are much more cloud-centric. More recent entrants to the market can afford to take a more nimble cloud approach since they were established as greenfield installations.

In comparison, broadcasters have big legacy issues in their technology infrastructures. They cannot simply throw everything out and start from scratch, but this is exactly what their competitors can do. When applied to broadcasters, the supposed cheapness of the cloud – suggested to be as much as a 40 percent reduction in costs – can be a misleading assessment. Broadcasters cannot look at the cloud in isolation as a cure-all, but instead must look in holistic fashion at each of the areas where the agility they afford makes cloud-based solutions the right answer.

Chris Osika is a big supporter of cloud-based broadcast operations when used in the right way. “Cloud deployment can be disruptive to traditional broadcast business models in a number of ways,” he states. “Cloud significantly increases speed to market for new ventures. What used to take 90 days to get off the ground, now takes just a fraction of that time. In a fiercely competitive market where companies are fighting tooth and nail to win new eyeballs, bringing new products to market with speed is incredibly important.

“Cloud also significantly lowers the threshold for entry in terms of up-front costs. Once again, cloud-based launches represent a fractional cost since upfront infrastructure expenditure can be small. This makes companies’ business plans much more agile – they can take more risks, getting to market fast and relatively cheap. This single issue can revolutionize business development strategies for traditional broadcasters,” comments Chris Osika.

Thirdly, organizations can scale-up – and scale-down – their new operations very rapidly. Whether you are a broadcaster or a service provider, you have much more freedom and flexibility to change your business model. In a crowded market, you can get much more creative – and even experimental - with the way that you sell media products to your core audience.

“As a media company, cloud deployment can provide more flexibility in terms of the numbers and combinations of channels that you sell. As the head of a major traditional broadcaster this kind of business agility is critically important to be competitive in today’s market.”

Transformation is a journey, not a light switch
Telestream believes that however appealing the cloud sounds, it is critical that companies employ the technology platform that best suits their workflows at the right time. The company’s solution models do not assume that customers will wholesale move all their production and distribution capabilities to the cloud at once. “At Telestream, we employ a flexible, conservative approach,” explains Chris Osika. “The cloud is valuable, but there are a number of potential weaknesses in cloud strategies that need to be factored into your decisions.

“Most customers are brownfield sites with considerable legacy infrastructure issues. We can help them along a path of sensible transformation. Our technology does not require we advocate a wholesale infrastructure switch-out. Transformation is a journey, not a light switch: we act as a trusted partner and as such we would not help by suggesting that customers throw everything into the cloud,” he explains.

According to Telestream, private-cloud, virtualized data centers can be a first stage. Once business operations have been established and have proven successful, they can be transitioned to the public cloud. However, numerous large media entities are sufficiently uncertain about the public cloud that they have brought their operations back to private cloud. It is helpful to employ technology like that of Telestream which can support workflows no matter where and how they’re deployed.

“There are lots of instructive lessons about cloud that have been learned outside of the broadcast industry – it is wise to observe these closely before making major strategic moves that will have a long-term impact on core business profitability, and even on the ability to survive in a fierce commercial market,” concludes Chris Osika. “Telestream’s approach to the cloud is different from other companies in this sector: hybrid approaches afford flexibility to capture the advantages of cloud, while mitigating the constraints. This approach allows for truly agile business strategies, accommodating all the variants of cloud, from public and private, and on-premise – which ever works best for an organization.”

Author: kristi@highrezpr.com
Posted: May 25, 2018, 11:33 am
RED Digital Cinema will be at Cine Gear Expo this year in Los Angeles at The Studios at Paramount from June 1-2. Located at Booth S101 in Stage 17, RED will showcase its DSMC2™ camera line-up featuring its premier sensors, MONSTRO 8K VV, HELIUM 8K S35 and GEMINI 5K S35. Additionally, RED will ...

RED Digital Cinema will be at Cine Gear Expo this year in Los Angeles at The Studios at Paramount from June 1-2. Located at Booth S101 in Stage 17, RED will showcase its DSMC2™ camera line-up featuring its premier sensors, MONSTRO 8K VV, HELIUM 8K S35 and GEMINI 5K S35. Additionally, RED will demonstrate 8K workflow, covering 8K REDCODE RAW, HDR and image processing pipeline (IPP2).

RED will also be taking attendees behind the scenes on Christopher Probst, ASC’s new short film, Epoch. On June 1 at 12:45pm and June 2 at 11:45am, Probst will break down his approach to shooting the short film, set in a post-apocalyptic world of harsh, dusty exteriors and dark desolate nights. Probst and director Rich Lee relied on the sensor qualities of the RED MONSTRO to deliver a visually compelling 13-minute narrative finished in 4K. Both sessions will take place in the Sherry Lansing Theater on the Paramount lot.

For more information, visit http://www.red.com/cinegear-2018

Author: Ignite Strategic Communications
Posted: May 24, 2018, 11:01 pm
The E.W. Scripps Co. said it renewed affiliation agreements with ABC and CBS The agreement with ABC covers all 15 Scripps ABC affiliates. Those affiliates are in Bakersfield, Calif; Baltimore; Boise, Idaho; Buffalo, New York; Cincinnati; Cleveland; Denver; Detroit; Indianapolis; Las Vegas; ...

Agreements cover 16 markets

The E.W. Scripps Co. said it renewed affiliation agreements with ABC and CBS

The agreement with ABC covers all 15 Scripps ABC affiliates.

Those affiliates are in Bakersfield, Calif; Baltimore; Boise, Idaho; Buffalo, New York; Cincinnati; Cleveland; Denver; Detroit; Indianapolis; Las Vegas; Phoenix; San Diego; Tampa, Fla.; Tucson, Ariz.; and Twin Falls, Idaho.

The agreement with CBS covers WTVF-TV in Nashville.

Brian Lawlor

“These renewals reinforce our long-standing relationships with two of our most important network partners,” said Brian Lawlor, president of Local Media for Scripps. “Together, we serve local communities around the country with news, entertainment, sports and other high-quality programming that draws tens of millions of viewers a day. We value our strong, mutually beneficial partnerships with these networks.”

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: May 24, 2018, 10:39 pm
AMC Networks promoted Michael Graf to senior VP of advertising sales for BBC World News TV. Graf, who joined AMC Networks as VP, ad sales, in 2015, continues to oversee sales, pricing and inventory, research and operations for the channel. He reports to Scott Collins, president of national ad sales ...

Exec joined AMC in 2015

AMC Networks promoted Michael Graf to senior VP of advertising sales for BBC World News TV.

Graf, who joined AMC Networks as VP, ad sales, in 2015, continues to oversee sales, pricing and inventory, research and operations for the channel. He reports to Scott Collins, president of national ad sales for AMC Networks.

Michael Graf

AMC Networks is the advertising sales representative for the BBC World News channel in the U.S. BBC World News offers viewers a diverse mix of authoritative news, business, sports, travel and documentary programs.

Related: AMC Networks Names Jen Caserta Chief Transformation Officer

“In an increasingly crowded and sometimes polarizing media environment, Michael continues to successfully underscore the important role of BBC World News as a trusted and advantageous space for advertisers” said Collins. “He has done a great job in developing and leading the sales efforts for the channel, and I am extremely pleased to recognize his efforts with this elevated role.”

Prior to joining AMC Networks, Graf worked at BBC Worldwide focusing on BBC America and BBC World News. Earlier in his career, he held roles at Scripps Networks Interactive, Discovery Communications, Fox Sports, among others.

“It is an exciting opportunity to lead the sales efforts for a brand that is so well respected globally as it continues to grow its presence here in the U.S.” said Graf. “BBC World News offers our advertising partners a space that is safe, credible and unbiased at a time when advertisers need it most, allowing their messages to land with clarity and efficiency.”

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: May 24, 2018, 10:13 pm
In the spirit of broadband bipartisanship, Sens. Roger Wicker (R-Miss.), Maggie Hassan (D-N.H.), and Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) have introduced a bill to more accurately map where wireless broadband is available. '[T]he FCC’s coverage maps, which are used to prioritize broadband expansion efforts, are ...

Sens. take aim at FCC map fof eligibility for billions in broadband deployment funds

In the spirit of broadband bipartisanship, Sens. Roger Wicker (R-Miss.), Maggie Hassan (D-N.H.), and Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) have introduced a bill to more accurately map where wireless broadband is available.

'[T]he FCC’s coverage maps, which are used to prioritize broadband expansion efforts, are inaccurate for New Hampshire, and many rural areas," said Hassan. "This bipartisan bill will improve the process by which Granite Staters can help identify errors in the FCC’s maps and help ensure that New Hampshire is appropriately represented in broadband expansion efforts."

“The FCC’s seriously-flawed mobile coverage map threatens to exclude many rural communities from much-needed wireless broadband support,” said Wicker. “The FCC should address Americans’ concerns and fix this inaccurate map."

Back in February, the FCC released a map showing areas it determined were eligible for billions of dollars in support of deploying 4G mobile broadband service from its Mobility Fund Phase II auction. The FCC is making $4.53 billion available over the next 10 years.

The Mobile Accuracy and Precision Broadband (MAP Broadband) Act would require the FCC to:

· "Extend the challenge process window by 90 days to ensure that challengers with limited resources and personnel have enough time to challenge the map;

· "Disclose the eligible handsets (i.e. phones) that each mobile wireless service provider has approved for challengers to use in the challenge process;

· "Provide monthly updates on the number of entities that the Commission has approved to participate in the challenge process as challengers, and the percentage of the total geographic areas initially determined to be ineligible for MF-II support that have been challenged under the challenge process; and

· "Provide annual updates on the expansion of mobile wireless service through the MF-II program."

Wicker, joined by Hassan, Moran, and others, in March wrote the FCC to express their concerns about the Mobility Fund Phase II map (the fund goes to subsidize wireless broadband too hard to reach, or justify paying to reach, areas, mostly rural).

“Chairman Pai believes the Mobility Fund Phase II reverse auction, which will allocate up to $4.53 billion over the next decade to extend 4G LTE mobile broadband to areas that lack coverage, is a critical component to bridging the digital divide," said an FCC spokesperson.

"We are actively working to ensure that the auction is a success and agree with many of the ideas set forth in this legislation. Indeed, we are already working on providing public disclosure of handset information and monthly updates on the challenge process.  We also will provide annual updates on post-auction buildout progress. In short, we value input from Members of Congress and look forward to continuing to work with them so that the Mobility Fund Phase II auction is a success.”

“I thank Senators Wicker, Hassan and Moran for their bipartisan leadership on the MAP Broadband Act,” said Competitive Carriers Association President Steven K. Berry.  “Many competitive carriers serve rural or hard-to-reach areas of the country and rely on critical MF II support to serve their customers and expand their networks. The challenge process is a key part of the MF II program and the MAP Broadband Act will help ensure unserved and underserved areas, especially those in rural America, are not left behind in the digital world.”

“Extending the challenge process window until November 27, 2018 and requiring the FCC to publish monthly updates on the challenge process will provide carriers, as well as state, local, and Tribal governments, greater clarity and better opportunities to participate in the challenge process."

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 24, 2018, 7:47 pm
Debra Lee, BET Networks chair and CEO, has announced her resignation, effective May 28.  Lee, who began her time with BET as its first VP and general counsel in 1986, was elevated to president and COO in 1996 and became chair and CEO in 2005. She had already handed day-to-day leadership over ...

Exec wraps up 32-year run at leading African-American network

Debra Lee

Debra Lee, BET Networks chair and CEO, has announced her resignation, effective May 28. 

Lee, who began her time with BET as its first VP and general counsel in 1986, was elevated to president and COO in 1996 and became chair and CEO in 2005. She had already handed day-to-day leadership over to BET Networks president Scott Mills in January. 

“As a young corporate attorney I saw my role as the protector of the BET brand and its employees,” Lee said of her start at BET. “And today, more than 32 years later, I still see myself as the protector and defender of a brand that I have helped to grow as a top destination for audiences across the globe. I have called BET Networks home for over three decades, and this team is part of my extended family.”

Lee said she was proud of “the legacy of values” she helped to instill at the network. “Together, we have built a world-class brand that connects with fans through the power of storytelling and we have attracted and nurtured top talent across the globe,” she said.

Lee has focused on diverse, high-quality scripted programming that BET says positively highlights the African-American experience. Key shows include Being Mary Jane, The Real Husbands of Hollywood and In Contempt. Her commitment to music and live entertainment led to The BET Awards.

BET is part of Viacom. No successor has yet been named for Lee’s positions at BET.

After she leaves, Lee will continue her role on corporate and non-profit boards, and her work with Time's Up and The Recording Academy Diversity & Inclusion Task Force. Lee’s annual gathering of prominent African-American women, Leading Women Defined, will also continue under her leadership.

“Debra’s vision and creativity have cemented BET Networks as a premier network for African Americans and lovers of black culture,” said Bob Bakish, president and CEO of Viacom. “As BET continues to move forward, we will always be grateful to Debra for her leadership and commitment to creating top-notch entertainment that both entertains and empowers. Her passion for the BET brand has resulted in countless wins and has allowed BET to stay competitive in a growing media landscape.”

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: May 24, 2018, 7:39 pm
The House has overwhelmingly (351 to 66) passed the massive defense appropriations bill HR 5515, the National Defense Authorization Act for 2019, a bill that includes a data privacy win for tech companies. In a late-edition amendment, the Email Privacy Act was adopted by voice vote Thursday morning ...

Passes bill to give email same search protections as snail mail

The House has overwhelmingly (351 to 66) passed the massive defense appropriations bill HR 5515, the National Defense Authorization Act for 2019, a bill that includes a data privacy win for tech companies.

In a late-edition amendment, the Email Privacy Act was adopted by voice vote Thursday morning (May 24). The bill, which updates the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, requires law enforcement to get a warrant before inspecting emails, texts and other electronic communications stored in the cloud.

The Email Privacy Act, which was pushed through by Rep. Kevin Yoder (R-Kan.) passed the House unanimously last year but got no further.

"We thank the House of Representatives for joining our industry's commitment to protect and empower consumers to create, share and collect electronic data in a secure and private manner - regardless of where it's stored or for how long," said Consumer Technology Association president Gary Shapiro. 

"Under the current rules of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) of 1986, government officials can bypass search warrant requirements for any data stored in the cloud longer than 180 days," Shapiro added. "This legislation eliminates the different requirements for cloud data, replacing them with a single standard so online communications have the same privacy protections as physical mail. This gives consumers confidence that all personal data is legally and equally protected."

The Senate has not passed its version of the bill, with which the House version must be reconciled, but it was a step forward in securing equal protection for electronic communications from unreasonable searches.

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 24, 2018, 7:11 pm
Only hours after privacy groups said they were pushing U.S. companies to adopt EU privacy protections going into effect May 25, a quarted of Democratic senators added their shove to the issue.\ Sens. Ed Markey (D-Mass.), Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) ...

Democrats say to do otherwise relegates U.S. to second-class digital citizemship

Only hours after privacy groups said they were pushing U.S. companies to adopt EU privacy protections going into effect May 25, a quarted of Democratic senators added their shove to the issue.\

Sens. Ed Markey (D-Mass.), Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) joined to co-sponsor a congressional resolution calling on those companies to "provide Americans with privacy protections included in the European law. The robust EU privacy protections," including the EU's opt-in requirement for using information that Democrats in this country have been advocating for years, particularly Markey, both in the House and now the Senate.

Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) pushes level privacy playing field.

The EU framework also includes data security, breach notification and special protection for children's information, also all on Democrats' privacy wish lists.

“When the European privacy law takes effect, the American people are going to wonder why they are getting second-class privacy protections,” said Markey. “If companies can afford to protect Europeans’ privacy, they can also afford to do so for their American customers and users. Under the European rules, privacy is not an afterthought, and consumers, not corporations, are in charge of personal information. The American people want and deserve a comprehensive privacy bill of rights, and it is time Congress acts to protect this important 21st century right.”

The resolution is not a mandate, but simply a "sense of the Senate" encouragement to apply the EU standards here and an explanation of why that is important.

Per Markey's office, the following are some of the EU provisions they particularly want to see in the U.S.

1. "The requirement that data processors have a legal basis for using individuals’ data, including opt-in consent

2. "The requirement that data processors design their systems in a way that minimizes the processing of data to only what is necessary for the specific purpose stated to the individual, and the requirement that data processors, by default, protect personal information from being used for other purposes

3."The requirement that entities processing children’s data institute special protections, particularly with reference to the use of children’s data for marketing purposes

4. "The individual’s right to know who has access to her/his data

5. "The individual’s right to revoke permission to use her/his data at any time

6. "The individual’s right to not be subject to automated decision making, including profiling, without human intervention that has legal or otherwise significant effects on the individual."

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 24, 2018, 6:28 pm
Offbeat comedy Baskets, executive produced by, and starring, Zach Galifianakis, has been renewed for a fourth season by FX. It will air in 2019. Baskets features Galifianakis as twins Chip and Dale Baskets, Louie Anderson as Christine Baskets and Martha Kelly as Martha. “Baskets continues to ...

Galifianakis’ Chip and Dale Baskets to be back for more action

"Baskets"

Offbeat comedy Baskets, executive produced by, and starring, Zach Galifianakis, has been renewed for a fourth season by FX. It will air in 2019.

Baskets features Galifianakis as twins Chip and Dale Baskets, Louie Anderson as Christine Baskets and Martha Kelly as Martha.

Baskets continues to deliver thanks to the dream creative team led by Jonathan Krisel and Zach Galifianakis, and we couldn’t be happier to order a fourth season to air next year,” said Eric Schrier, president of original programming at FX Networks and FX Productions. “Each season brings us closer to the Baskets family and their pursuit of life, love and clowning glory. Our thanks to the producers and the cast for making Baskets such a joy to watch.”

Related: FX Orders ‘Mr. Inbetween’ Scripted Series

The recently concluded third season saw the Baskets family attempt to run a rodeo together.

The series is produced by FX Productions. Besides, Galifianakis, the executive producers are Krisel, Marc Gurvitz, Andrea Pett-Joseph, and Anna Dokoza.

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: May 24, 2018, 6:15 pm
LynTec’s NPAC Delivers Leading Power Technology, Improves AVL Installation Efficiencies for Rebuild of the Multipurpose Theater Hit by Devastating Tornado LENEXA, Kan. — May 24, 2018 — LynTec, a leading manufacturer of innovative electrical power control solutions for professional audio, video, and ...

LynTec’s NPAC Delivers Leading Power Technology, Improves AVL Installation Efficiencies for Rebuild of the Multipurpose Theater Hit by Devastating Tornado

LENEXA, Kan. May 24, 2018 — LynTec, a leading manufacturer of innovative electrical power control solutions for professional audio, video, and lighting systems, announced that Louisiana Media Group (LMG) installed LynTec’s award-winning Networkable Power Automation Control (NPAC) rack-mounted system at Thomas Hall Theater at William Carey University in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. The 1,200-seat multipurpose theater was one of many buildings on the campus damaged by a tornado in January 2017.

View the 6 images of this gallery on the original article

Because of the tornado, all except one building on William Carey University campus suffered damage. The roof of the 1,200-seat Thomas Hall Theater was destroyed and subsequently required a complete renovation of the interior and the AVL systems. Since the theater hosts a wide variety of events, including plays, musical performances, educational classes, and chapel services, it was critical to restore the functionality to the space without sacrificing quality. LMG, a full-service AV company, oversaw the design and installation of the theater’s new audio system, including a state-of-the art digital mixing console.

Founded in 2011, LMG is a full-service AV company that specializes in working with the house of worship market. Its goal is to deliver leading sales, service, and installation expertise to their clients, leveraging the best technology available. The NPAC’s complete, ready-to-install power management solution enabled LMG to provide complete power protection, control, and sequencing capabilities right in the rack, eliminating the need for an outside electrician or subcontractor and saving project time and costs.

“This is a new chapter for the school,” said Mike Marchese, president of LMG. “They are rebuilding with the future in mind, and every decision made as part of that process has been critical, but time was definitely of the essence. When we saw the NPAC at InfoComm, we knew it would be the ideal power solution for the multipurpose venue. It not only gave us superb power control and sequencing for all the new gear going in, it also made the installation incredibly easy and sped up the timeline of the project by not having to wait for an electrician to come and wire in panels.”

Part of LynTec's networkable product lineup, the NPAC is the only rackmount solution of its kind to sequence on/off complex digital audio systems with easy-to-program extended step rates and time delays that guarantee proper component boot-up and shutdown automatically. It features four 20A circuit inputs in a single 2-RU enclosure and can manage up to 80 amps in a single 2-RU unit. The NPAC series includes four models — 120V or 240V to manage higher voltage loads — and features four 20-amp circuit inputs, with 4 or 8 relays, in a single 2RU enclosure, saving integrators valuable rack space over 4RU systems and eliminating the need to wire multiple units together.

Circuits can fire in any order required, even from unit to unit, with no extra wiring required as long as each NPAC is connected to the network. Outlets can be controlled individually or as a sequenced group with up to 12 zones across 10 units. The unit boasts pre-terminated cables that are ready to plug into existing sources and four NEMA 5-20 outlets (6-20 outlets for the 240V model) that allow for easy connection to gear. An outbound relay (O/R) control option adds two single-pole, double-throw, 2-amp, low-voltage relays to allow users to also control external devices equipped with contact closures as part of their AV lighting (AVL) control platform.

“Getting the theater up and running as quickly as possible after the tornado was incredibly important,” said Mark Bishop, president of LynTec. “With the NPAC, LMG could keep the momentum going on the project. It solved the necessary power protection and control to its entire AVL outfit.”

More information on LynTec’s full line of products is available at www.LynTec.com. For more information about LMG, visit www.lmgav.com.

Visit LynTec at InfoComm 2018, Booth C1319

# # #

About LynTec

LynTec is a leading manufacturer of innovative electrical power control solutions for professional audio, video, and lighting systems. Working closely with system designers, LynTec incorporates electrical protection, circuit switching capabilities, and an operational controller within a common enclosure — saving valuable wall space, lowering installation costs, and simplifying system operation. This state-of-the-art approach to electrical control solutions has positioned LynTec as a trusted resource for any installation with complex power control requirements. More information is available at www.LynTec.com.

PR Link: www.ingearpr.com/LynTec/180524LynTec.docx

Image Link: www.ingearpr.com/LynTec/LynTec_LMG.zip

Follow LynTec:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LynTec

Twitter: https://twitter.com/LynTecPower

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/LynTecPower 

Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: May 24, 2018, 5:07 pm
Fremont, CA - May 24, 2018 - Blackmagic Design today announced its Cintel Film Scanner has been installed at the heart of a new state-of-the-art analog film processing laboratory launched by Silbersalz Film, a Stuttgart-based film production company. Founded by three cinematographers, Silbersalz ...

Blackmagic Design today announced its Cintel Film Scanner has been installed at the heart of a new state-of-the-art analog film processing laboratory launched by Silbersalz Film, a Stuttgart-based film production company.

Fremont, CA - May 24, 2018 - Blackmagic Design today announced its Cintel Film Scanner has been installed at the heart of a new state-of-the-art analog film processing laboratory launched by Silbersalz Film, a Stuttgart-based film production company.

Founded by three cinematographers, Silbersalz Film specializes in creating tailor-made online campaigns for international brands, by combining unique looks with strong creative ideas.

“As creatives and DPs, we love the superior look that you can achieve with celluloid and so do our clients! It truly is a wonderful medium, and that is why we have invested so heavily in analog," begins Silbersalz Film co-founder, Josua Stäbler.

Combining established analog film working practices with new digital technologies and workflows, Silbersalz Film is designing a smaller, more environmentally friendly film processor that relies on fewer chemicals to develop 16mm and 35mm film negative. The processed reels are then scanned in real-time using the Cintel Film Scanner, and from there, 4K proxies are created.

"We began using DaVinci Resolve three years ago, and it now acts as a centralized hub for both analog ingest and digital post production," he continues. "In doing so, we have eliminated any need for roundtripping. So, when it came to choosing a film scanner, Cintel was the obvious choice. It provides the perfect link, seamlessly bridging our analog and digital workflows."

The Cintel Film Scanner is currently located in the office lobby, and connected over Thunderbolt to Silbersalz Film’s master editing suite. Every scanned reel is saved to a centralized editing RAID, after which, it is processed through Resolve to create ProRes 4444 proxies, which are immediately available for editing and color correction.

This combination of software and hardware is ideal for boutique production companies such as Silbersalz Film, explains Josua. "Most of the time we'll create a campaign from beginning to end, so the ability to do everything from one edit suite, using one program, creates a lot of efficiencies and speeds up our turnaround."

He continues: "Not only is it straightforward to set up and operate, regardless of your familiarity with film, but we have also been impressed by the quality of the final scans and the tight integration with DaVinci Resolve. We love the simplicity of both scanner and software!”

"The fact we started out as DPs is definitely what has made us passionate about celluloid and fortunately, we have the Blackmagic Cintel Film Scanner so that we can really explore that passion, even as a relatively small boutique outfit,” concludes Josua.

Press Photography

Product photos of the Cintel Film Scanner, DaVinci Resolve, and all other Blackmagic Design products are available at www.blackmagicdesign.com/media/images.

About Blackmagic Design

Blackmagic Design creates the world’s highest quality video editing products, digital film cameras, color correctors, video converters, video monitoring, routers, live production switchers, disk recorders, waveform monitors and real time film scanners for the feature film, post production and television broadcast industries. Blackmagic Design’s DeckLink capture cards launched a revolution in quality and affordability in post production, while the company’s Emmy™ award winning DaVinci color correction products have dominated the television and film industry since 1984. Blackmagic Design continues ground breaking innovations including 6G-SDI and 12G-SDI products and stereoscopic 3D and Ultra HD workflows. Founded by world leading post production editors and engineers, 

Blackmagic Design has offices in the USA, UK, Japan, Singapore and Australia. For more information, please go to www.blackmagicdesign.com.

Author: Wire Contributor
Posted: May 24, 2018, 4:59 pm
Calling it akin to the Facebook-Analytica third-party data sharing problem, Rep. Frank Pallone (D-N.J.), ranking member of the House Energy & Commerce Committee, has called on committee chairman Greg Walden (R-Ore.) to hold a hearing on the issue.That came after a New York Times report that ...

Responds to reports of apparent unauthorized sharing of wireless carriers location info

Calling it akin to the Facebook-Analytica third-party data sharing problem, Rep. Frank Pallone (D-N.J.), ranking member of the House Energy & Commerce Committee, has called on committee chairman Greg Walden (R-Ore.) to hold a hearing on the issue.

That came after a New York Times report that third-party providers Location Smart and Securus appeared to have obtained location information collected in the course of wireless carriers providing cell service.

Pallone wants to know whether that violates the Communications Act requirement that carriers and vendors protect user information and get consent before disclosing it to a third party.

“A hearing on how this information was made available is necessary to better understand whether the privacy protections in the Communications Act were violated and whether Congress needs to take action to ensure users’
data are protected," Pallone told the chairman in a letter dated Thursday (May 24).

Pallone said the reports suggest there are gaps in the law, or its enforcement, that need filling.

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 24, 2018, 4:50 pm
Fox took top prize in the Wednesday prime ratings, as Empire led it to a 1.4 score in viewers 18-49, according to Nielsen’s overnights, and a 6 share. That edged past the 1.3/6 that CBS put up. The Empire finale did a flat 1.6 and the Star season closer went down 8% to 1.2. On CBS, the Survivor ...

Other season finales include so-so ‘Star’ and strong ‘Law & Order: SVU’

"Empire" season finale, May 23. 2018

Fox took top prize in the Wednesday prime ratings, as Empire led it to a 1.4 score in viewers 18-49, according to Nielsen’s overnights, and a 6 share. That edged past the 1.3/6 that CBS put up.

The Empire finale did a flat 1.6 and the Star season closer went down 8% to 1.2.

On CBS, the Survivor finale rated a 1.5, up 7% from last week. The Survivor Reunion did a 1.1.

NBC did a 1.0/4. A Law & Order: SVU repeat led into the two-hour season finale at 1.2, up 20% from last week.

ABC was at 0.6/3. The film Toy Story 3 scored a 0.7 and 20/20 did a 0.5.

Telemundo rated a 0.5/2 and Univision a 0.4/2.

The CW scored a 0.2/1. It was in repeats.

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: May 24, 2018, 4:10 pm
CMT has revealed its summer schedule, with new series Bachelorette Weekend, from Jersey Shore producer SallyAnn Salsano, debuting August 2. Also on the warm-weather schedule are the final run of Nashville and a new season of Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders: Making The Team. Bachelorette Weekend follows ...

Cable net shares summer schedule, which has ‘Bachelorette Weekend’ lined up for August 2 debut

CMT has revealed its summer schedule, with new series Bachelorette Weekend, from Jersey Shore producer SallyAnn Salsano, debuting August 2. Also on the warm-weather schedule are the final run of Nashville and a new season of Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders: Making The Team.

Bachelorette Weekend follows the staff of Bach Weekend, a Nashville-based company specializing in creating memorable bachelor/bachelorette experiences. Owner/founder Robbie and his team work tirelessly to ensure their high-maintenance clients have a flawless experience. That starts August 2.

Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders: Making the Team also starts August 2. There are 13 episodes in season 13. The docu-series “captures the rigors of training camp on the path to become a member of the world’s most elite squad,” says CMT. “The coveted spots require hard work and commitment, and not everyone has what it takes to make the team.”

Drama Nashville has eight episodes left. Hayden Panettiere and Charles Esten are in the cast. Panettiere’s Juliette is ready to take on cult leader Darius, while Esten’s Deacon is forced to face his past when an unwelcomed visitor arrives. Nashville returns Thursday, June 7.

The 2018 CMT Music Awards premieres June 6, with Little Big Town hosting the live event. CMT Crossroads, with Leon Bridges and Luke Combs, starts June 28. CMT Hot 20 Countdown, hosted by Cody Alan and Katie Cook, at present time has new episodes every Saturday.

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: May 24, 2018, 4:06 pm
The Senate will hold an antitrust hearing on the proposed T-Mobile-Sprint merger. The two companies announced last month they had struck an all-stock deal to combine, arguing the $146 billion company would become a stronger competitor to former Bells Verizon and AT&T. Related: Computer ...

Antitrust subcommittee will hold hearing

The Senate will hold an antitrust hearing on the proposed T-Mobile-Sprint merger.

The two companies announced last month they had struck an all-stock deal to combine, arguing the $146 billion company would become a stronger competitor to former Bells Verizon and AT&T.

Related: Computer Companies Seek Thorough Review of T-Mobile-Sprint Deal

Critics counter that the deal will reduce choice in the burgeoning wireless broadband market.

The Senate Judiciary Committee's Antitrust Subcommittee will hold a hearing on the deal June 27, a committee spokesperson confirmed.

Some Senate Democrats, including Antitrust Subcommittee ranking member Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), have told the Department of Justice and the FCC that they have serious concerns about the proposed merger.

They did not say they opposed the deal, but they spelled out the reasons they thought it needed close scrutiny, including claims that combining the third and fourth largest wireless carriers is pro-competitive.

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 24, 2018, 3:47 pm
The Late Late Show With James Corden will broadcast from London June 18-21 on CBS. Corden, an Englishman, will host a lineup of guests that includes Cher, Cate Blanchett, Orlando Bloom and Foo Fighters. This marks the second U.K. trip for The Late Late Show. While in London, Corden “will share ...

English host hits homeland June 18-21

"The Late Late Show With James Corden," with guests Amanda Peet and Johnny Knoxville on May 23, 2018

The Late Late Show With James Corden will broadcast from London June 18-21 on CBS. Corden, an Englishman, will host a lineup of guests that includes Cher, Cate Blanchett, Orlando Bloom and Foo Fighters.

This marks the second U.K. trip for The Late Late Show. While in London, Corden “will share highlights of his homeland with American viewers,” says CBS, and the show’s signature musical and comedy segments, such as “Crosswalk: The Musical” and “Take a Break,” “will get a British makeover.”

“Broadcasting The Late Late Show from James’ hometown of London last year was such a thrill,” said Ben Winston, executive producer. “Thanks to CBS and our partners at Sky One, we are back for a second year. We are looking forward to a fun week in London, putting a U.K. spin on our nightly show.”

Sky, which is the home to The Late Late Show in the U.K., will broadcast the London episodes June 19-22 at 10:00 PM on Sky One and NOW TV.

The show is produced by CBS Productions and Fulwell 73.

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: May 24, 2018, 3:32 pm
The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) go into effect May 25, and privacy groups are pushing companies to commit to the same standard for their U.S. operations. That came in letters from more than two dozen privacy groups to edge giants Amazon, Facebook and Google, and ad ...

Say if companies can do it over there, they can do it here

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) go into effect May 25, and privacy groups are pushing companies to commit to the same standard for their U.S. operations.

That came in letters from more than two dozen privacy groups to edge giants Amazon, Facebook and Google, and ad giants Walmart, Nestle and others to use the EU regime as a baseline for their own U.S. data protection policies.

Some companies have signaled they will square their domestic policies with the new, tough EU standards, but privacy groups are looking for wider acceptance. 

Facebook, for example, has pledged to provide data control tools and options to its U.S. users. It explained in a Facebook Business post the tough new EU standards it must adhere to abroad:

"[GDPR] applies to all companies that process personal data about individuals in the EU, regardless of where the company is based," Facebook explained. "Processing is defined broadly and refers to anything related to personal data, including how a company handles and manages data, such as collecting, storing, using and destroying data."

Facebook continued: "While many of the principles of this regulation build on current EU data protection rules, the GDPR has a wider scope, more prescriptive standards and substantial fines. For example, it requires a higher standard of consent for using some types of data, and broadens the rights individuals have for accessing and transferring their data. Failure to comply with the GDPR can result in significant fines — up to 4% of global annual revenue for certain violations."

Related: Twitter, Yahoo! Adjusting Terms of Service

That is the baseline privacy groups are looking for at home. Among those signing on to the letter were the Center for Digital Democracy, the Consumer Federation of America, Consumer Watchdog and the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC). 

The GDPR "places limits on the gathering and use of personal data and establishes clear responsibilities for companies that collect it, as well as clear rights for people whose data is gathered," the groups pointed out, saying that is the sort of consumer control that should be standard across the globe.

“Since you will be providing these protections for hundreds of millions of people in Europe, there is no question that you are capable of applying the same protections worldwide,” the letter said. “We insist that you do."

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 24, 2018, 2:58 pm
Facebook is continuing to try to address the issues around fake news that have put it in the spotlight in Washington, including threats that if it did not do something about being used as a misinformation tool by foreign actors and others, Congress would.  That threat came from a Democratic ...

Includes video, study, ad campaign

Facebook is continuing to try to address the issues around fake news that have put it in the spotlight in Washington, including threats that if it did not do something about being used as a misinformation tool by foreign actors and others, Congress would. 

That threat came from a Democratic senator from California, the home of Silicon Valley.

Facebook this week announced a three-pronged effort to combat misinformation, and help restore trust in the massive social platform.

"False news is bad for people and bad for Facebook," blogged Tessa Lyons, a product manager on News Feed, concentrating on false news. "We’re making significant investments to stop it from spreading and to promote high-quality journalism and news literacy."

Related: Senate Drills Down on Cambridge Analytica Scandal

Appropriately, the company posted a Facebook video, Facing Facts, to explain how the company is coming to terms with mistakes is has made, why they were made, and what it needs to do to reduce the chances for misuse of its social platform without becoming a censor. Members of the News Feed team talk in the video about the complexity of the problem and how they are trying to tackle it.

Related: Facebook Extends Disclosures to Issue Ads

Adam Mosseri, VP, product management, News Feed/Sharing, said Facebook had made mistakes in what it had done, how it explained what it did, and "perhaps not explaining enough."

View the original article to see embedded media.

The Facebook approach also includes a news literacy campaign via print ads and on the News Feed providing tips on how to spot false news and filling in the general public on the steps Facebook is taking.



Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 24, 2018, 2:31 pm
CBS medical drama Code Black will not return for another season on the network. Showrunner Michael Seitzman shared the news on Twitter.  ABC Television Studios produces the show, in association with CBS Television Studios. Seitzman is also creator and executive producer. Season three started ...

‘Our best episodes have yet to air,’ says showrunner Seitzman

"Code Black" stars Rob Lowe and Marcia Gay Harden.

CBS medical drama Code Black will not return for another season on the network. Showrunner Michael Seitzman shared the news on Twitter. 

ABC Television Studios produces the show, in association with CBS Television Studios. Seitzman is also creator and executive producer.

Season three started April 25. Code Black has rated a 0.8 and three 0.7s in adults 18-49, per the Nielsen overnights. Seitzman's tweet suggested the rest of the season will air. A query to CBS was not responded to by press time.

The cast includes Marcia Gay Harden, Boris Kodjoe, Harry Ford, Benjamin Hollingsworth, William Allen Young and Luis Guzman. Rob Lowe joined the cast last season.

Code Black takes place at a fictitious Los Angeles hospital, Angels Memorial, with an extremely busy emergency room.

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: May 24, 2018, 2:10 pm
While networks fret that they’ve been abandoned by younger viewers, Nielsen said they’re watching linear TV content, but they’re not sitting in the living room while they're watching. It’s true that younger viewers are among the most active video streamers, but the relatively affluent members of ...

Broadcast networks see 13% lift

While networks fret that they’ve been abandoned by younger viewers, Nielsen said they’re watching linear TV content, but they’re not sitting in the living room while they're watching.

It’s true that younger viewers are among the most active video streamers, but the relatively affluent members of the millennial generation and Generation Z are also watching linear TV content in out-of-home locations, according to a new Nielsen report.

With Nielsen measuring out of home viewing more thoroughly, and more ad buyers accepting out-of-home viewing among the impressions they pay for, the finding could mean extra dollars for TV networks.

Related: Nielsen Offers Quicker Data on Out-of-Home Viewing

ESPN was one of the first networks to subscribe to Nielsen’s Out-of-Home reporting service and use those extra viewers in negotiations with advertisers. Adding viewing in bars, health clubs, offices and mass transit lifts ESPN’s viewership by 8.5%, the network said.

Turner, ABC and CBS have also signed up for Nielsen’s Out-of-Home service.

Related: ESPN Touts Effectiveness of Commercials Seen Out of Home

In its new report, Nielsen looked at all out-of-home viewing during 2017. It found that 39% of all out-of home-viewing came from Gen Z and millennials, or 14% more than their national in-home viewing.

News viewing is usually thought to be largely confined to older viewers, but when looking at Out-of-Home consumption, the share represented by millennials and Gen Zers nearly tripled. Gen X’s share was also higher out-of-home (23%) than in-home (18%).

Nearly half of the out-of-home viewing for sports came from Gen Z and millennials.

Looking at all TV networks, out-of-home viewing was 6% higher among millennials and 7% higher with Generation Z at home. Broadcast networks saw a 13% lift among member of Gen Z and a 10% lift among millennials. Entertainment networks saw a 5% lift with Gen Z and a 4% lift with millennials.

“For decades, media owners and buyers knew that OOH audiences existed, but haven’t ever been able to quantify and transact on these coveted consumers,” Nielsen said in its report. "Over the past year, new OOH insights into these on-the-move consumers has fueled a broader conversation about the opportunities that OOH audiences present for both buyers and sellers.

“Whether it’s reaching an OOH audience that is 6% more likely to be affluent (household income over $100K) for persons 18-49 or achieving a significant lift for key genre and demos, OOH insights are providing clarity and opportunity to deliver increased audiences to media plans,” Nielsen added.

“What’s more, having a true line of sight into the out-of-home consumer provides advertisers a means of connecting with younger audiences,” the report concluded. “In fact, OOH is a viable way to reach Gen Z and Millennials as these highly social generations have two-times higher OOH percent lifts than Baby Boomers and the Greatest Generation.”

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: May 24, 2018, 2:00 pm
ABC News says its Michael Jackson special, The Last Days of Michael Jackson, does not infringe on the estate of the late pop star, but removed an image from its promos. In an email to B&C, a representative of the estate said that the show, which airs Thursday (May 24), said it wanted viewers to ...

Estate of late singer not assuaged by removal of image in promos

ABC News says its Michael Jackson special, The Last Days of Michael Jackson, does not infringe on the estate of the late pop star, but removed an image from its promos.

In an email to B&C, a representative of the estate said that the show, which airs Thursday (May 24), said it wanted viewers to know that the special was not authorized by the estate and that Disney had "ignored" its intellectual property rights by using a copyrighted photo and silhouette image owned by the estate in promotional material.

Removing the image did not assuage the estate.

Related: ABC News Moves on 24/7 Streaming Network

"Only after notice from our attorneys to ABC News indicating they were infringing on our IP rights were the materials removed," the representative said in a statement. "We are told ABC intends to use music and other intellectual property owned by the Estate such as photos, logos, artwork, and more in the program itself, without having licensed the rights to any such material. Imagine if this was done with any of ABC's intellectual property. We believe the special to be another crass and unauthorized attempt to exploit the life, music and image of Michael Jackson without respect for Michael's legacy, intellectual property rights or his children."

“ABC News’ documentary explores the life, career and legacy of Michael Jackson, who remains of great interest to people worldwide," ABC News said in a statement. "The program does not infringe on his estate’s rights, but as a courtesy, we removed a specific image from the promotional material.”

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 24, 2018, 12:39 pm
WUPPERTAL, Germany — May 24, 2018 — Riedel Communications once again provided a comprehensive communications and signal distribution infrastructure for the annual Viña del Mar International Song Festival, a world-famous live music event held Feb. 20-25 in Viña del Mar, Chile. Riedel's MediorNet ...

WUPPERTAL, GermanyMay 24, 2018 — Riedel Communications once again provided a comprehensive communications and signal distribution infrastructure for the annual Viña del Mar International Song Festival, a world-famous live music event held Feb. 20-25 in Viña del Mar, Chile. Riedel's MediorNet real-time media network provided redundant and decentralized signal routing and transport for the entire production, broadcast live from the Quinta Vergara Amphitheater. The production crew relied on Riedel’s Bolero wireless intercom solution and Artist digital matrix intercom system for all on-site communications, with intercom signals routed over MediorNet.

View the 3 images of this gallery on the original article

In its 59th year, the Viña del Mar International Song Festival is the largest and best-known music festival in Latin America, with more than 15,000 local spectators and an estimated global audience of 200 million. For the entire festival, which included 19 music programs, Chilevision produced the broadcast signal based on feeds supplied by partners Chilefilms and Intervideo and transported over Riedel’s robust, fiber-based signal and communications backbone.

“The logistical and production challenges of our festival continue to grow every year, as both our broadcast and live audiences demand an increasingly sophisticated experience. For the communications and signal-distribution infrastructure, we needed a partner that could handle the complexities and deliver a 100 percent bulletproof solution,” said Cristián Mena Foncea, Technical Coordinator, Viña del Mar International Song Festival 2018. “Riedel has an outstanding reputation for providing fail-safe communications for some of the world’s biggest and most high-profile events, and its solutions are world-renowned for their reliability and technical excellence. We knew we could depend on Riedel to provide a comprehensive solution that would meet all of our requirements.”

The Riedel backbone consisted of three MediorNet modular frames and 27 Artist digital matrix intercom panels in a decentralized configuration that provided fully redundant distribution of all intercom, video wall, and video signals throughout the festival venue. In a facility as large and complex as the Quinta Vergara Amphitheater, wireless communications can be challenging, but Bolero’s Advanced DECT Receiver (ADR) technology provided crystal-clear communications throughout the arena with only eight AES67-networked antennas. With 27 Bolero beltpacks deployed to the production team, the Bolero wireless intercom system enabled full roaming for the crew throughout the arena. Nine Riedel RiFace radio interfaces and 36 Performer C3 Partyline beltpacks provided additional connectivity for walkie-talkie users, allowing them to communicate with the Bolero users through a seamless integration with the Artist panels.

“Every year, the Viña del Mar International Song Festival outdoes itself with an ever more exciting lineup of talent, dazzling production elements, and eye-popping staging. It’s no wonder that this is one of Latin America’s oldest and most popular musical events,” said Angel González España, International Sales Manager, Latin America, Riedel Communications. “It was a privilege to provide a complete, end-to-end communications infrastructure that ensured a smooth and successful production, and we’re looking forward to supporting the festival into the future.”

Further information about Riedel and the company’s products is available at www.riedel.net.

# # #

About Riedel Communications

Riedel Communications designs, manufactures, and distributes pioneering real-time video, audio, data, and communications networks for broadcast, pro audio, event, sports, theater, and security applications. The company also provides rental services for radio and intercom systems, event IT solutions, fiber backbones, and wireless signal transmission systems that scale easily for events of any size, anywhere in the world. Riedel is headquartered in Wuppertal, Germany, and employs over 500 people in 19 locations throughout Europe, Australia, Asia, and the Americas.

All trademarks appearing herein are the property of their respective owners.

Follow Riedel:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RiedelCommunicationsInternational

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Link to Word Doc: www.wallstcom.com/Riedel/180524Riedel.docx

Link to Photos: www.wallstcom.com/Riedel/Riedel-Vina-del-Mar-Festival-Photos.zip

Description of Photos: Riedel Communications provided a comprehensive communications and signal distribution infrastructure for the annual Viña del Mar International Song Festival.

Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: May 24, 2018, 12:33 pm
American Cable Association president Matt Polka has come out strongly against any combination of Comcast and Fox programming, saying his association would fight to block such a deal deal. On the news that Comcast had made an all-cash offer for the 21st Century Fox assets Disney is eyeing, Polka ...

Says it would be worse than Disney/Fox deal

American Cable Association president Matt Polka has come out strongly against any combination of Comcast and Fox programming, saying his association would fight to block such a deal deal.

ACA president Matt Polka

On the news that Comcast had made an all-cash offer for the 21st Century Fox assets Disney is eyeing, Polka said such a meld would not be good for either consumers or competition. 

"ACA will join with consumers and others fighting against higher prices and anticompetitive practices to stop such a deal," he said.

ACA was no big fan of the combination of Disney and the Fox assets, either. Those Fox assets in play include which include cable channels FX, FXX, National Geographic, the 20th Century Fox TV and movie studio, 22 regional sports networks and U.K. satellite assets, but do not include Fox News Channel, Fox Business Network, Fox Broadcasting Company and "certain other assets."

Related: With Rival Bid, Comcast Complicates the Fox Hunt

"Comcast/NBCU's owning these assets is even more harmful," he said. "Comcast already has the incentive and ability to leverage NBCU programming to harm consumers and competition. What's more, the conditions the FCC once used to rein in Comcast/NBCU's propensity for bad acts have expired. As a result, Comcast can keep raising the price for consumers for its television, sports, and cable programming by threatening to withhold all of this programming at once. And, by being able to carry NBCU programming at more favorable rates and terms than it charges rivals, Comcast can also harm its competition to totally dominate the market."

Polka cited the combination of regional sports nets and national programming that the combined company would control as a big reason the deal would be anticonsumer.

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 23, 2018, 9:48 pm
Longtime kids privacy advocates Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) and Rep. Joe Barton (R-Tex.) are trying, trying again. Markey and Barton have re-introduced their Do Not Track Kids Act, which would update the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998 (COPPA) -- Markey was co-author of the law -- to ...

Democratic legislators Give COPPA update that old secondary school try

Longtime kids privacy advocates Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) and Rep. Joe Barton (R-Tex.) are trying, trying again.

Markey and Barton have re-introduced their Do Not Track Kids Act, which would update the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998 (COPPA) -- Markey was co-author of the law -- to tighten rules for collecting, using and disclosing children's personal information online, including a digital "erase" button both have long pushed for, and to extend those protections to middle schoolers and early high-schoolers.

They were joined by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) and Rep. Bobby Rush (D-Ill.) in reviving the Do Not Track Kids Act, also familiar allies in their fight for stronger protections for kids online.

The bill would, among other things, extend the COPPA protections, which currently cut off at age 12, to kids 13, 14 and 15. Those teenagers could not have their personal info, including location info, collected without their consent.

It also creates that familiar "eraser button," which would allow parents to delete the personal information of their child online when it is technically feasible to do so.

“The Internet can be a child’s 21st century playground, and we need to make sure parents can keep their kids safe,” said Markey. “COPPA is the communications constitution for protecting kids online, but we need to update it to reflect the explosive growth and innovation in the online ecosystem. The Do Not Track Kids Act puts parents in control of their children’s information and contains commonsense protections for teenagers. As we see every day the implications when personal information gets hacked, I hope the least we can do is come together on a bipartisan basis to provide a privacy bill of rights for children and minors in our country.”

Related: Flashback to 2015: DMA Pans Return of Kids Do Not Track Act

Specifically, the bill would:

"Prohibit Internet companies from collecting personal and location information from anyone under 13 without parental consent and anyone 13 to 15 years old without the user's consent;

Prohibit targeted advertising to children;

"Establish a “Digital Marketing Bill of Rights for Minors” that limits the collection of personal information of minors, including geolocation information of children and minors;

"Create an 'Eraser Button' for parents and children by requiring companies to permit users to eliminate publicly available personal information content submitted by the child, when technologically feasible;

"Require online companies to explain the types of personal information collected, how that information is used and disclosed, and the policies for collection of personal information;

"Prohibit the sale of internet connected devices targeted towards children and minors unless they meet robust cybersecurity and data security standards, which are established by the Federal Trade Commission; and

"Require manufacturers of connected devices targeted towards children and teens to prominently display on the packaging of connected devices a privacy dashboard detailing to what extent the sensitive information is collected, transmitted, retained, used, and protected."

“Children and teens are prime targets of a powerful and pervasive digital data collection apparatus, that track and target them 24/7,” said Jeff Chester, executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy and one of the strongest voices for protecting children's online privacy. “Young people today require the highest possible privacy protection. The Do-Not-Track Kids Act will help ensure they are safe.”

The eraser button bill has a history of reintroductions, most recently in 2015, where it failed to gain traction. Rush and Blumenthal were on that bill as well, as they were on the 2013 version, which followed the original 2011 version.

The current climate surrounding protections of online data, or lack of them, could provide more fertile ground for boosting COPPA protections. Markey seems to think so, or at least hope so. "As we see every day the implications when personal information gets hacked, I hope the least we can do is come together on a bipartisan basis to provide a privacy bill of rights for children and minors in our country,” he said.

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 23, 2018, 7:57 pm
PLAINVIEW, NY, MAY 23, 2018 - Core SWX, a leader in battery and charging solutions, announces the launch of its Core Driven microsite, dedicated to its Core Driven Ambassador Program, which is comprised of some of the most talented, leading professionals within the professional video industry. ...

PLAINVIEW, NY, MAY 23, 2018 - Core SWX, a leader in battery and charging solutions, announces the launch of its Core Driven microsite, dedicated to its Core Driven Ambassador Program, which is comprised of some of the most talented, leading professionals within the professional video industry.

The microsite showcases Core's ambassador directors, cinematographers, filmmakers and camera operators with individual profile pages. Each page provides a banner, brief professional biography, a film reel of their latest work, a list of the gear they trust for each setup and what Core SWX battery packs they are "driven by" on set. In addition, their social channels are linked, allowing viewers across the globe to follow them.

"This microsite was developed as an initiative to focus solely on the Core Driven Ambassador Program and the video professionals that are a part of it," says Caitlin Stroke, marketing coordinator, Core SWX. "Whether they're leading the way in cinematography for films, documentaries, wildlife, action sports, broadcast and more, Core SWX wants to highlight their journey as they trust Hypercore batteries to capture inspiring footage."

Some of the ambassadors currently featured on the microsite include: Cinematographer/Director Renan Ozturk, best known for his work shooting and starring in the 2015 Sundance documentary MERU; award-winning Director and Cinematographer Ty Evans who has made a name for himself in the action sports film and commercial industries, and Cinematographer Chris Ray, who works with companies ranging from DC Shoes, to NFL Films, to ESPN and more.

The microsite also features creative full-service media agencies such as Ironclad, a team of storytellers and artists producing cinematic campaigns driven by Hypercore battery technology.

"As Core continues to expand its reach in the professional video industry, we think it is important to present the experiences that prominent industry professionals are having with our products," says Stroke. "It's the best testimonial for our customers."

To learn more about the Core Driven Ambassador Program and who else is a part of it, please visit: http://coreswx.com/coredriven/

About Core SWX

Core SWX is the market leader in batteries and charging solutions for the digital cinema and the professional video industries, along with emerging markets such as drones and virtual reality. Our flagship products, including the Hypercore line of batteries, remain at the forefront, providing the power to create in a variety of applications. Compatible with leading professional and consumer manufacturers, such as Sony, Panasonic, Canon, RED, Blackmagic Design and more, Core SWX stays ahead of the curve in a technology-driven era that is constantly evolving. For more information, visit www.CoreSWX.com.

Author: D. Pagan Communications
Posted: May 23, 2018, 7:53 pm
Good Trouble is the official name of the spinoff to Freeform drama The Fosters, the network said. The spinoff series, announced in January, follows Callie (played by Maia Mitchell) and Mariana (Cierra Ramirez) as they embark on the next chapter of their lives in Los Angeles. Production starts this ...

Production starts this summer on series about Callie and Mariana finding their way in Los Angeles

"Good Trouble"

Good Trouble is the official name of the spinoff to Freeform drama The Fosters, the network said.

The spinoff series, announced in January, follows Callie (played by Maia Mitchell) and Mariana (Cierra Ramirez) as they embark on the next chapter of their lives in Los Angeles.

Production starts this summer. Jon M. Chu will direct and executive produce the first episode.

Good Trouble is produced by Jennifer Lopez's Nuyorican Productions Inc. in association with Freeform.

Joanna Johnson, Peter Paige and Bradley Bredeweg are the Good Trouble creators and showrunners. Gregory Gugliotta, Christine Sacani, Maia Mitchell, Cierra Ramirez, Jennifer Lopez, Elaine Goldsmith-Thomas and Benny Medina are executive producers.

“We’re seeing millennials in this country doing extraordinary things, making noise, taking action,” said Johnson, Paige and Bredeweg in a statement. “Stirring up Good Trouble as they grow, strive and struggle to make the mess of their early twenties into the message. As Callie and Mariana venture to Los Angeles to start their adult lives and embark on their separate but intertwined journeys to change the world, they’re going to have all the Good Trouble they can handle.”

The Fosters series finale event airs June 4-6 on Freeform. The show is about a multi-ethnic family of adopted and biological kids raised by two mothers. Stef Adams Foster (Teri Polo), a police officer, and her wife, Lena Adams Foster (Sherri Saum), a school vice principal, have built a family with Stef’s biological son from a previous marriage, Brandon (David Lambert); their adopted twins, Mariana (Cierra Ramirez) and Jesus (Noah Centineo); and adopted siblings Jude (Hayden Byerly) and his half-sister, Callie (Maia Mitchell).

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: May 23, 2018, 7:51 pm
ESPN has reached a deal to become the exclusive media home of the Ultimate Fighting Championships in the U.S. ESPN outbid incumbent Fox, which recently reached an agreement to air WWE Entertainment’s SmackDown on Friday nights. Related: Fox Adding WWE Smackdown To Lineup of Live Sports “ESPN’s ...

‘Fight Nights' will feature full card of bouts

ESPN has reached a deal to become the exclusive media home of the Ultimate Fighting Championships in the U.S.

ESPN outbid incumbent Fox, which recently reached an agreement to air WWE Entertainment’s SmackDown on Friday nights.

Related: Fox Adding WWE Smackdown To Lineup of Live Sports

“ESPN’s unparalleled multimedia platform is the perfect home for the UFC and will deliver tremendous value to both parties,” said Jimmy Pitaro, ESPN president and co-chairman, Disney Media Networks. “UFC fans are passionate and loyal and we plan to bring the full power of ESPN’s live coverage, powerful storytelling and unmatched distribution to serve them in an unprecedented fashion. We can’t wait to get started.”

ESPN's Jimmy Pitaro

Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Combined with an earlier deal that put some UFC events on ESPN and the new ESPN+ direct-to-consumer service, published reports put the total value at more than $1.5 billion over five years.

“Every year for the last 18 years, we have taken this sport and brand to another level,” Dana White, president of UFC said. “We find innovative ways to promote our athletes and build stars. Today is another monumental day for UFC, our athletes, and our fans. We are now part of the ESPN family, recognized around the world as the pinnacle in sports broadcasting. I am very excited for this next chapter for UFC.” 

With more than 280 million fans around the world, UFC boasts the youngest fan base among major professional sports organizations in the U.S., with a median age of 40, and an audience comprising 40% millennials.

The deal calls for ESPN and ESPN+ to carry 42 live events, 30 of which will carry full cards of UFC battles.

Related: ESPN Shows It Can Keep Score in Digital

ESPN will televise 10 exclusive events as well as all UFC pay-per-view preliminary fights. ESPN will brand its programming UFC on ESPN Fight Night.

ESPN+ will have 20 exclusive events and all preliminaries for UFC on ESPN Fight Night programs.

“The expansion of our relationship with UFC is an exciting development for fight fans,” said Kevin Mayer, chair, direct-to-consumer and international, The Walt Disney Co. “Delivering 20 exclusive UFC fight nights per year and a host of original content to UFC’s young, passionate and tech-savvy fan base, makes ESPN+ the clear new digital home for UFC and further establishes our new service as the leading platform for direct-to-consumer sports streaming.”

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: May 23, 2018, 7:33 pm
LONDON - May 23, 2018 - Saturday, May 19, marked a historic occasion as Britain's Prince Harry and American Meghan Markle wed in a ceremony at St. George's Chapel on the grounds of Windsor Castle. By transmitting more than 200 hours of content over the course of the weekend, The Switch played an ...

LONDON - May 23, 2018 - Saturday, May 19, marked a historic occasion as Britain's Prince Harry and American Meghan Markle wed in a ceremony at St. George's Chapel on the grounds of Windsor Castle. By transmitting more than 200 hours of content over the course of the weekend, The Switch played an integral part in aiding global news and entertainment coverage of this historic event.

In partnership with ITN Productions, a fully-manned stand-up position at Windsor Castle was accessible to customers of The Switch. From Windsor Castle, media could hand off live and replay feeds to The Switch, London, which were delivered to multiple distribution outlets across the United Kingdom, as well as internationally to the United States, Canada, New Zealand and Australia for both linear distribution and over-the-top platforms.

Leaning on deeply rooted relationships with British broadcasters, The Switch was also able to provide The Royal Wedding International clean feed to news organizations who had licensed the event, which was live from 09:30-14:30 BST, from The Switch's London facilities. Additionally, The Switch's London studios were utilized for live shots supporting the event.

"The Switch is proud to have played a critical role in supporting the coverage of The Royal Wedding, an event the entire world watched," said Keith Buckley, President and CEO at The Switch.

"Utilizing The Switch to aid in the distribution of our news coverage allowed us to simplify one piece of a complex event," said Tami Hoffman, Head of News at ITN Productions. "As one of the three host broadcasters, we appreciate the quality and ease of delivering news coverage to The Switch on a day of record output."

The Royal Wedding drew a massive international viewing audience. According to Nielsen ratings, early estimates suggest two billion people worldwide tuned in to watch Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's wedding, 29 million of which were U.S. viewers.

About The Switch

The Switch is a leading global video solutions service provider, with owned and operated facilities in North America, Europe and the Asia Pacific region. The Switch currently provides advanced video switching and local fiber circuit services, scalable Ethernet, at-home remote production facilities, production studios, OTT transcoding, satellite delivery and network origination to more than 800 demanding video content producers and distributors around the world.

Author: D. Pagan Communications
Posted: May 23, 2018, 7:26 pm
ABC is expanding Good Morning America to three hours this September, said Ben Sherwood, co-chairman, Disney Media Networks and president, Disney-ABC Television, on Wednesday. To make room for the third hour, which will air at 1 p.m. ET, ABC is canceling food-themed talk show, The Chew after seven ...

Cancels food-themed talk show ‘The Chew’ to make room

ABC is expanding Good Morning America to three hours this September, said Ben Sherwood, co-chairman, Disney Media Networks and president, Disney-ABC Television, on Wednesday. To make room for the third hour, which will air at 1 p.m. ET, ABC is canceling food-themed talk show, The Chew after seven seasons.

“Over the past six years, Good Morning America has solidified its place as America’s No. 1 morning show. We believe there is great opportunity for viewers and advertisers in expanding to a third hour,” said Sherwood in a statement. 

“While this is the right decision for our business, it is also bittersweet. For seven years, The Chew has delighted audiences by delivering innovative food segments in an entertaining atmosphere. We applaud and thank Gordon Elliott, Aimee Householder, Michael Symon, Carla Hall, Clinton Kelly and the entire cast and crew for their great work and amazing run. And we wish them the very best.”

“Before The Chew, no one had attempted a talk/food hybrid,” said creator and executive producer Elliott in a statement. “Our hosts Clinton, Carla and Michael and the staff created television history executing the show as well as they did for all these years. I know I speak for all of the people who work on the show when I say it was the best television we have ever had the privilege to produce.”

Additional information about GMA's new hour — including its title and anchors — will be announced later.

Good Morning America keeps finding new ways to inform and delight our audience. We recently expanded GMA through our social channels and a newly launched website. Now we will build a whole new hour of compelling content that is true to GMA’s spirit,” said James Goldston, president of ABC News, also in a statement.

That ABC would expand GMA to three hours had been rumored two years ago when co-anchor Michael Strahan left Disney-ABC’s syndicated Live with Kelly to go full-time at the morning program. At the time, ABC said it was something that had been in consideration for a while, but the network wasn't ready to make the move yet. 

Besides Strahan, Good Morning America is anchored by Robin Roberts, George Stephanopoulous and chief meteorologist Ginger Zee. It currently airs live Monday through Friday from 7 to 9 a.m. Michael Corn is the show’s senior executive producer.

Changes have been afoot at the program for the past several weeks. Last month, co-anchor Lara Spencer's days were cut from five days a week to three. Another co-anchor, Amy Robach, was just promoted to weekly primetime news magazine 20/20, which she will co-anchor with World News Tonight's David Muir, while continuing to report for GMA and other ABC News properties.

Author: Paige Albiniak
Posted: May 23, 2018, 7:09 pm
A U.S. district court judge has ruled that the President's blocking for critics from his Twitter account is unconstitutional.  The Knight First Amendment at Columbia University had filed suit in the Southern District of New York on behalf of seven people who "were blocked from the ...

Judge says President is not above the First Amendment

A U.S. district court judge has ruled that the President's blocking for critics from his Twitter account is unconstitutional. 

The Knight First Amendment at Columbia University had filed suit in the Southern District of New York on behalf of seven people who "were blocked from the @realDonaldTrump Twitter account after criticizing the President," according to Knight.

Knight said that the President and his communications staffers had violated the First Amendment by blocking them because they had criticized him or his policies.

Related: Trump Raises Specter of Revoking Press Credentials

They said the President's account was a public forum and the government could not exclude people just because of their views. Knight also argued Trump was violating their right, also under the First Amendment, to petition the government for redress of grievances.

According to various reports, Judge Naomi Reice Buchwald agreed that Twitter is a public forum, so blocking users based on political speech was unconstitutional, rejecting the White House's assertion that the First Amendment was not applicable. 

At press time the decision was not on the court website's rulings of special interest page, though there was obviously a lot of interest in it. 

The judge reportedly did not enjoin the President from blocking critics, or provide injunctive relief, leaving it at the determination that the law prevented such blocking and that the President was not above the law.

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 23, 2018, 7:08 pm
House Democrats, who have a bone to pick with FCC chairman Ajit Pai over numerous issues from broadcast and net neutrality deregulation to merger review and broadband subsidies, also have a bone to pick with what they say has been a lack of responsiveness to their queries about those and other ...

Say his answers to queries have been incomplete, or not in evidence

House Democrats, who have a bone to pick with FCC chairman Ajit Pai over numerous issues from broadcast and net neutrality deregulation to merger review and broadband subsidies, also have a bone to pick with what they say has been a lack of responsiveness to their queries about those and other issues. The chairman's office countered that he has provided answers and will be giving them more.

That came in a letter from every Democratic member of the House Energy & Commerce Committee Communications Subcommittee. 

They pulled no punches. 

"[W]e are concerned about your repeated evasive responses to our inquiries and our outright refusal to respond to some members of this Committee," they wrote the chairman. 

They said they appreciated his willingness to testify before the committee, but said he had provided incomplete responses both at those hearings and to follow-up questions and letters from them.

They included a host of letters they say the chairman has yet to answer completely, adding they want complete, written responses to those by June 4.

“We have already responded to 21 of the letters in question and look forward to responding to the remaining few in the near future,”  said an FCC spokesperson.

It is not the first time House E&C Dems have pressed an FCC chair for more answers. In 2015, a quartet of leading committee Dems were not happy with Chairman Tom Wheeler's answers at an oversight hearing, and wrote him to say they were looking for a lot more information than they got. That letter's tone of admonishment, if relatively mild, struck some Hill watchers as unusual coming from the same party as the chairman.In fact, three of the four signatories to that Wheeler letter back in 2015 were also on this week's letter to Pai.

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 23, 2018, 6:20 pm
image caption: Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS) graduate Scott Taylor, who will be participating in the school’s June 2 Open House and June 1 Grad Panel Forum at CRAS’ Gilbert, Ariz. campus. Gilbert, Ariz., May 23, 2018 - The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS; ...

image caption: Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS) graduate Scott Taylor, who will be participating in the school’s June 2 Open House and June 1 Grad Panel Forum at CRAS’ Gilbert, Ariz. campus.

Gilbert, Ariz., May 23, 2018 - The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS; www.cras.edu), the premier institution for audio engineering education, will be opening the doors to its Gilbert, Ariz. campus (1205 N. Fiesta Blvd.) to prospective students, parents, and the media on Saturday, June 2 from 10am – 4pm. Three CRAS graduates will be on hand for the Open House, and they will also be part of an Open Panel Forum held for current CRAS students the evening of June 1.

“There are a host of opportunities for our students once they graduate, and we want to give them an idea of what’s out there first hand for them once they enter the open market,” said Kirt Hamm, CRAS administrator. “Besides our mandatory internship program, getting our students in touch with our graduates who either are working for others, or who have made the leap into self employment, is huge. That’s what this grad panel is about in our upcoming Open House. Continued education, networking, and learning what it takes for going out on one’s own by those who have done it already is of enormous value for any student.”

Hamm continued, “We also want prospective students and their parents to discover everything there is to know about a CRAS education, and with hard work and dedication just how successful they can be. For instance, every year, CRAS graduates populate, in great numbers, Grammy nominations for the year. Most recently, seven of our graduates worked on multiple 2018 Grammy Award-winning nominations by numerous artists. In total, 28 CRAS graduates worked on 26 Grammy-nominated albums and songs across 28 categories this past year.”

Members of the June Open House Grad Panel include:

· Micheal Peterson - engineer based out of L.A. He has held many positions including house engineer, head assistant engineer, light technician and has assisted in most management areas. He’s worked with Wiz Khalifa, Snoop, Miguel, Avenged Sevenfold, The Cult, Anthrax, Winery Dogs, Twenty One Pilots and the full Glee cast.

· Scott Taylor - stage manager and audio technician currently for Chris Issak; worked tours with Young The Giant (FOH engineer); Bush (systems engineer / FOH technician); Pat Benatar (FOH technician); Cher Lloyd (monitor engineer); Big Bad Voodoo Daddy (monitor engineer); My Darkest Days (drum/audio consultant); No Doubt (monitor engineer); Poison (monitor technician); Linkin Park (PA technician); Jimmy Buffett (PA technician / monitor technician); Prophets of Rage (monitor technician).

· Jordan McClain - foley cuer/editor/mixer at Sinc Sound in downtown L.A. Most recent work includes S.W.A.T., Atlanta, and Westworld.

At the June Open House, guests will be able to interact with CRAS faculty and get a taste of the curriculum and the state-or-the-art audio gear spread throughout its numerous classrooms as well as its 42-foot Mobile Broadcast Unit. They will also be able to participate in live demonstrations in many of these real world audio recording studios, live sound venue, and labs.

The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences is composed of two nearby campuses in Gilbert and Tempe, Ariz. A CRAS education includes Broadcast Audio, Live Sound, Audio Post for Film and TV, Music Production, Commercial Production and Video Game Audio, all taught by award-winning instructors who have excelled in their individual fields. CRAS’ structured programs, and highly qualified teaching staff, provide a professional and supportive atmosphere, which is complemented by its small class sizes allowing for individual instruction and assistance for students in engineering audio recordings. CRAS has been providing quality vocational training in Audio Recording for more than three decades. The curriculum and equipment are constantly being updated to keep pace with the rapid advancements in the music and sound recording industries. CRAS’ course offerings and subject matter have always centered around the skills and knowledge necessary for students’ success in the Audio Recording industries.

The 11-month program is designed to allow every student access to learn and train in all of the Conservatory’s studios which are comprised with state-of-the-art audio recording and mixing gear, the same equipment used in today’s finest studios and remote broadcast facilities, including Pro Tools 12, API Legacy consoles, SSL G+ and AWS consoles, Studer Vista consoles, and much more. All students must complete a 280-hour industry internship to graduate from the Master Recording Program II that may ultimately lead to industry employment.

“We want everyone to see, hear, and feel how our 11-month program focuses exclusively on what a student needs to know to begin living their passion in any one of the many facets of the Recording Arts,” Hamm concluded.

For more information on the Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences, please visit www.cras.edu, contact Kirt Hamm, administrator, at 1-800-562-6383, or email to info@cras.edu.

About The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences

Based in the heart of The Valley of the Sun with two campuses in Gilbert and Tempe, Ariz., The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS) is one of the country’s premier institutions for audio education. The Conservatory has developed a unique and highly effective way to help the future audio professional launch their careers in the recording industry and other related professional audio categories.

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Author: Charles Leib
Posted: May 23, 2018, 5:04 pm
NBC won the Tuesday prime title, posting a 1.4 in viewers 18-49, per the Nielsen overnights, and a 6 share as the finale of The Voice aired. That topped the 1.3/5 that ABC put up. On NBC, a repeat of The Voice led into the finale from 9 to 11 p.m., up 7% from last week’s show at 1.5. On ABC, the ...

Season finales abound, and series finale for ‘The Middle’ goes out with a pop

Country star Jason Aldean performs on the series finale of NBC's "The Voice," May 22, 2018.

NBC won the Tuesday prime title, posting a 1.4 in viewers 18-49, per the Nielsen overnights, and a 6 share as the finale of The Voice aired. That topped the 1.3/5 that ABC put up.

Brynn Cartelli, winner of "The Voice"

On NBC, a repeat of The Voice led into the finale from 9 to 11 p.m., up 7% from last week’s show at 1.5.

On ABC, the Roseanne finale slipped 8% to 2.4 and The Middle series swan song went up 21% to 1.7. The Splitting Up Together season closer did a 1.0 and For the People’s finale rated a 0.5, both shows flat.

CBS was at 0.8/3. The NCIS finale did a level 1.2 and led into an NCIS repeat. Sticking with CBS’ theme for the night, the premiere of 48 Hours: NCIS rated a 0.5.

The CW rated a 0.5/2. The Flash finale grew 14% to 0.8 and The Hundred was down 25% to 0.3.

Fox too did a 0.5/2, with the movie Hancock filling all of prime.

Telemundo scored a 0.5/2 and Univision a 0.4/2.

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: May 23, 2018, 4:26 pm
In a victory for court access advocates, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit will start live streaming audio of oral arguments beginning with the 2018-2019 term. That is according to Chief Judge Merrick Garland, who said Wednesday (May 23) that the court had voted to live stream all ...

Judge Garland says move to default setting for streaming will enhance transparency

In a victory for court access advocates, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit will start live streaming audio of oral arguments beginning with the 2018-2019 term.

That is according to Chief Judge Merrick Garland, who said Wednesday (May 23) that the court had voted to live stream all arguments, except those dealing with classified or sealed matters.The D.C. circuit has primary jurisdiction over government agency decision challenges, including the FCC. That is the court that will hear oral argument in the challenge to the FCC's network neutrality rules and is currently considering whether to overturn the FCC's UHF discount decision.

“[T]his is an important additional step in bringing transparency to our proceedings," said Garland in announcing the policy change. 

The new streaming policy will take effect Sept. 5, according to court spokesperson Betsy Paret. And why the decision to stream live? Paret said that it started as an "on request" policy last year but that given how many requests there were, the court decided to make live streaming the default setting, as it were.

Last October, in response to a request from Fix the Court, Judge Garland wrote in a one-sentence letter to executive director Gabe Roth, that the court would stream Garza v. Hargan, the first case the court agreed to stream. 

Fix the Court and C-SPAN have been vocal advocates for opening up the courts to the electronic public.

Recordings of oral arguments have been available online since September 2013 and recordings of the new live streams will be available at 2 p.m. on the day of argument.

"I think the D.C. Circuit decision shows the process other courts can follow, starting with same-day audio, then live streaming on request for major cases, then live streaming for all cases, should the judges support that policy," said Roth.

"This is good news for the idea that courts should be as accessible to the public as are Congress and the Executive," said C-SPAN general counsel Bruce Collins. "C-SPAN will carry this important court's oral arguments, and as we do we will look forward to the day the US Supreme Court follows its example."

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 23, 2018, 4:04 pm
Shark Week isn’t just for presidents any more. Discovery is launching a merchandising program to go along with its popular summer programming stunt featuring the toothy denizens of the deep, which is now in its 30th year. The merchandise includes apparel, accessories, books, toys and packaged ...

Discovery makes consumer product deals

Shark Week isn’t just for presidents any more.

Discovery is launching a merchandising program to go along with its popular summer programming stunt featuring the toothy denizens of the deep, which is now in its 30th year.

The merchandise includes apparel, accessories, books, toys and packaged goods. Highlighting Stormy Daniels’ claim that she watched Shark Week with President Trump is not part of the program.

“Over the last 30 years Shark Week has transformed into a pop culture phenomenon,” said Leigh Anne Brodsky, executive VP, Discovery Global Enterprises. “We are excited to have such incredible partnerships on board to give Shark Week fans the opportunity to see and experience this week of amazing, family-friendly content as we celebrate these fearsome and captivating ocean creatures.”

With ad sales flat and distribution challenged by cord cutting, media companies are looking at live events and consumer products as new ways to connect with fans and generate revenues.

One of the Discovery’s Shark Week deals is with Vineyard Vines, a company that makes whimsical neckties with a smiling pink whale logo. Vineyard Vines will be making more than 40 Shark Week products including apparel, ties, headwear, swimwear, towels, beach bags and drinkwear.

The companies said 20% of all process from camouflage-printed bikinis and board shorts will be donated to Oceans, a charitable organization dedicated to protecting and restoring the world’s oceans.

Discovery is also working with Build-A-Bear, which will have two special offerings for Shark Week. One is a make-your-own- Great White plush. The other is a make-your-own Hammerhead. Both have coordinated clothing options, including tank tops, board, board shorts and a Shark Week hoodie.

Walmart is also diving into the Shark Week tank with an in-store pallet train of products including toys, t-shirts, towels, snacks, books and DVDs, including an exclusive 30th anniversary DVD and Blu-ray combo pack.

Some stores will display a life-sized shark tank outfitted with a photo booth that takes pictures that can be shared on social media. An augmented reality experience will also be offered in some stores.

The Shark Week toys will include pool inflatables by Bestway that will be sold exclusively at Walmart. There will also be figure sets from Bright Kingdom from Dandee and novelties from Magic Time.

As part of the Discovery at Sea Program, Princess Cruises will offer a variety of Shark Week activities this summer. Guests sailing out of Fort Lauderdale will get a fully immersive experience, including restaurant and casino tables marking 30 years of Shark Week.

There will also be Shark Week boxer shorts created by Crazyboxer, t-shirts from Fifth Sun, socks from Sock Fancy, watches from Freestyle, throws and beach towels from Jay Franco, sunglasses from Knockaround and backpacks from Sprayground.

Bulu will have an official limited-edition Shak Week Box full of Shark Week apparel and collectibles, Everi will have a new Shark Week-themed slot machine that will be in select casinos and Shark Strike, the official app of Discovery’s Shark Week will be in the App Store and Google Play.

Apparel and accessories by The Rodnick Band will be featured in a pop-up store in London.

For readers, there will be books from Felwel and Friends and Time Inc. Books. A special collector’s magazine is being published by Topix Media Lab.

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: May 23, 2018, 4:00 pm
WALNUT, CA, MAY 23, 2018 - Over the past 40 years, Bill Eastham has helped grow broadcast education at Mt. San Antonio College, one of the largest single campus community college districts in California. Eastham has emphasized improving vocational training in remote television production in his ...

WALNUT, CA, MAY 23, 2018 - Over the past 40 years, Bill Eastham has helped grow broadcast education at Mt. San Antonio College, one of the largest single campus community college districts in California. Eastham has emphasized improving vocational training in remote television production in his current role as director of technical services, drawing from over 20 years of experience as a freelance broadcast and fiber engineer for prominent amusement parks, nationally televised award shows and political conventions. The college's classroom learning and student-led sports events have always integrated various broadcast products from Studio Technologies, manufacturer of high-quality audio, video and fiber-optic solutions. Most recently, Studio Technologies' Model 214 Announcer's Console units were added to the school's inventory of Dante-enabled equipment. These network-connected devices have helped students gain hands-on experience in live broadcasting applications by providing an intuitive, flexible solution for achieving on-air announcer positions during student-led sports productions.

Mt. San Antonio's remote production classes first utilized the analog Studio Technologies' Model 230 Announcer's Console and Model 41 IFB Interface unit. With the move to an all-digital environment, it was natural to transition to the Model 214, a tabletop unit designed to serve as the audio control center for announcers, commentators, and production personnel. The Model 214 integrates all on-air, talkback, and cue audio signal routing in one compact system that supports Ethernet transport using the Dante audio-over-Ethernet media networking technology.

"The Studio Technologies product line has always been well engineered and robust, and I suspect the Model 214 Announcer's Consoles will be with us for a long time," says Eastham. "Studio Technologies' products are the best solution for many of the challenges we encounter in the broadcast industry, and I trust them to work as expected every time I deploy a system."

The Model 214 is used for all the college's student-produced sporting events, as well as for classroom instruction. Eastham says students benefit from the Model 214's ease of deployment, while instructors appreciate the ability to hold impromptu hands-on class sessions due to the units' quick, simple setup. With just a single Power over Ethernet (PoE) Ethernet connection, the Model 214 can be easily deployed and quickly become operational. Additionally, for easy customization, the Model 214 allows a variety of optional modules to be installed.

"The simplicity of achieving a fairly elaborate connection to our production environment with a single network connection has taken a lot of pressure off me during our student productions," says Eastham. "I can throw out a fiber-attached PoE switch on the same tactical fiber that supports the announcer's video monitors and have the announcer's stations up and running in short order. The students also don't have any problems deploying or using the products, which is great."

Eastham also highlights the Model 214's "hot mic" feature, which provides an "always active" un-switched microphone audio output channel. If a student forgets to unmute their mic while on-air during a sporting event, faculty can jump in and use the hot mic output. This helps to ensure audio continuity without the need for special routing, "multing" with additional cables, or depending on available patch points.

Studio Technologies' STcontroller software application has also enhanced the college's use of the Model 214 units by offering a quick and easy means of confirming and revising microphone input parameters. Faculty members can use the STcontroller software to remotely adjust the gain on each student's Model 214 console during live sporting events.

Mt. San Antonio is in the process of building an all-new stadium for its football and track teams, which includes a proposed 64- by 36-foot LED display, which will serve as the scoreboard for the facility. Eastham plans on providing students with the opportunity to use the new stadium's amenities to enhance the fan experience both for game attendees and broadcasts viewers. He hopes students will produce content for all the college's home games, creating video for the LED display, streaming a live Webcast of the games, and providing play-by-play and color commentary using the Model 214 Announcer's Consoles. As part of this expanded coverage, Eastham is looking to add more of Studio Technologies' products to Mt. San Antonio's production workflow, including the Model 43D Dante IFB Interface to support some of the college's wireless IFB transmitters that are located around the field.

About Studio Technologies, Inc.

Studio Technologies, Inc. provides tailored, high-performance video, audio and fiber optic products for the professional audio and broadcast markets. Founded in 1978, the company is committed to designing and manufacturing dependable, cost-effective, and creative solutions for broadcast studio, stadium and corporate environments. Known for "designing for the way professionals work," the company is recognized as an industry leader. Product categories include fiber-optic transport, intercom and IFB interfaces, announcer consoles, and loudspeaker monitor control systems. A growing line of Dante-enabled Audio-over-Ethernet products is receiving wide recognition. For more information, please visit the Studio Technologies website at www.studio-tech.com or call 847.676.9177.

Author: D. Pagan Communications
Posted: May 23, 2018, 3:49 pm
Media Finance Focus 2018 - Dee Stevenson, Manager of Credit & Collections for Gray Television, and Neil Best, Credit Manager for Outfront Media, today received the top two awards for credit and collections professionals working in the media industry. Stevenson received the BCCA ...

Media Finance Focus 2018 - Dee Stevenson, Manager of Credit & Collections for Gray Television, and Neil Best, Credit Manager for Outfront Media, today received the top two awards for credit and collections professionals working in the media industry.

Stevenson received the BCCA Contributor Award from MFM, the Financial Management Association and its BCCA subsidiary, the media industry’s credit association. The BCCA Contributor Award recognizes individuals who have helped the BCCA credit and collections community in numerous ways.

Best received the association’s Peter F. Szabo Career Achievement Award, which is named in honor of a great supporter of MFM and BCCA and given to a past or current BCCA member whose efforts have contributed to the growth of the Association and the industries it serves.

The awards were presented during Media Finance Focus 2018, the 58 annual conference for MFM and BCCA, which was held from May 21-23 in Washington, DC (Hyatt Regency at Crystal City). More information about the awards, including previous recipients, may be found on the association’s website.

Stevenson joined Gray Television in her current role two years ago following 26 years of credit and collections work at Schurz Communications. In addition to her active involvement on MFM’s BCCA Committee, Stevenson was instrumental in bringing the newspaper industry’s credit group into the BCCA fold. 

For the past 15 years, Neil Front has been Director of Credit and Collections for Outfront Media, which was previously known as CBS Outdoor. Beforehand, he held similar posts in broadcast television, at ABC, Meredith Broadcast Group and Paxson Communications; and in print media, at Conde Nast and The Village Voice.

Additional information about Stevenson and Front and their many noteworthy contributions to the practice of media credit and collections may be found in the May-June “Conference Edition” of MFM’s The Financial Manager (TFM) magazine. A digital copy of the publication may be downloaded for a limited time from MFM’s website.

MFM-BCCA’s annual Media Finance Focus conferences serve as the primary source of professional education for the media industry’s business and credit management executives, including its digital media, video, games, publishing, broadcasting and broadband telecommunications enterprises. More information about Media Finance Focus 2018 may be found on the conference website.

About MFM and BCCA:

Media Financial Management Association (MFM) is the premiere resource for financial professionals for media industry education, networking, and information sharing throughout the U.S. and Canada. More information about MFM is available on its Web site: http://www.mediafinance.org and via its updates on Linkedin, Facebook and Twitter. Its BCCA subsidiary serves as the media industry’s credit association. BCCA’s revenue management services encompass a variety of credit reports on national and local media advertisers and agencies, including Media Whys, a credit report for media businesses which offers a credit score based on industry-specific aging combined with trade data from Experian or D+B. More information about BCCA is available at http://www.bccacredit.com as well as its updates on Linkedin, Facebook and Twitter.

Author: Media Financial Management Association
Posted: May 23, 2018, 3:20 pm
B&C has partnered with attention and conversion analytics company iSpot.tv to bring you a weekly chart we call Promo Mojo: exclusive data showing the top five TV promos ranked by TV ad impressions. These are the shows networks have been promoting most heavily to drive tune-in (our data covers ...

And more from Promo Mojo, our exclusive weekly ranking of the programming networks are promoting most heavily

B&C has partnered with attention and conversion analytics company iSpot.tv to bring you a weekly chart we call Promo Mojo: exclusive data showing the top five TV promos ranked by TV ad impressions. These are the shows networks have been promoting most heavily to drive tune-in (our data covers the seven-day period through May 20).

Following four weeks in a row during which cable networks swept our top five, a traditional broadcaster, NBC, takes our top spot thanks to 256.6 million TV ad impressions for promos plugging the 2018 Billboard Music Awards.

Beyond that tentpole, though, two cable nets dominate the rest of our ranking with promos for their regular programming: TNT takes second and third place, respectively, for its crime dramas Animal Kingdom and Claws, while HGTV’s feel-good multi-series promo lands at No. 4 and its Love It or List It closes out the chart.

Notably, Love It or List It scores the highest iSpot Attention Index (143) in our ranking, with its promos getting 43% fewer interruptions than the average promo (interruptions include changing the channel, pulling up the guide, fast-forwarding or turning off the TV).

View the original article to see embedded media.
Author: Eleanor Semeraro, Analyst and Contributor, TV[R]EV
Posted: May 23, 2018, 3:00 pm
With second-season ratings rising and a spinoff on a sibling network slated to premiere June 4, A&E’s Live PD continues to gain momentum as it delivers viewers across multiple airings and platforms. On Friday and Saturday nights, typically the lowest-rated of the week for most networks, Live PD ...

Avid fans form virtual community around #LivePDNation

With second-season ratings rising and a spinoff on a sibling network slated to premiere June 4, A&E’s Live PD continues to gain momentum as it delivers viewers across multiple airings and platforms.

On Friday and Saturday nights, typically the lowest-rated of the week for most networks, Live PD is drawing a crowd. The show, which launched its second season Oct. 6, 2017, averaged 1 million viewers 25-54 per episode for the first four months of 2018, A&E said. As of the April 28 episode, season two’s ratings were up 43% over season one’s, while ratings have climbed 140% overall since the series premiere on Oct. 28, 2016.

And like popular reality franchises including Real Housewives and Keeping Up With the Kardashians, the show got its first spinoff before the end of its sophomore campaign. Lifetime in April announced the 20-episode Live PD Presents: Women on Patrol, which will focus on female officers.

The "Live PD" studio team: Commentator Sgt. Sean "Sticks" Larkin, host Dan Abrams and co-host Tom Morris Jr.

The Dan Abrams-hosted Live PD is a successor to Cops for a new millennium, using Twitter to both capitalize on and drive fan engagement. With just over 245,000 followers (as of May 18), the show’s @OfficialLivePD Twitter account averages more than 100,000 interactions during each week’s live broadcasts and another 23,000 during the repeats, Elaine Frontain Bryant, A&E’s head of programming, said.

"I've never witnessed anything like it," Bryant said, adding that an avid virtual community has formed on Twitter around the hashtag #LivePDNation. "You never know what's going to happen on the show. That makes it really ripe for social conversation.”

Live PD uses Twitter to sound the drumbeat about two hours prior to each episode, posting the line-up of the seven law enforcement agencies it’s riding along with that night. The show has contracts with eight different counties across the country, and each has developed its own fanbase, which starts to chime in as soon as the line-up is posted.

An hour later, Abrams breaks in live on A&E to conduct the Live PD Roll Call, a run-down of each featured county’s history on the show; simultaneously their recent clips appear on the Twitter feed, and the conversation continues to grow. Viewers start checking in with #9PMRoutine tweets confirming they’ve heeded law enforcement calls to be safely inside, doors locked, by 9 p.m. Showtime.

Once the live show gets started, everyone becomes a lawyer. Or a director. “The fans are very opinionated,” Bryant said. They maintain a running commentary on every aspect of the show, even tweeting when they think it’s time to cut to new action.

The live viewer engagement has also influenced the outcome of the live onscreen action. During the April 14 episode, for example, viewers tweeted en masse when they saw a figure through a window of a house where Richland County, S.C., officers were investigating a reported break-in in progress.

The officers, who had originally concluded the house was empty, returned to the scene based on the tweets. Indeed, someone was inside: the housesitter.  

Live PD also gives viewers official opportunities to be part of the action, via segments seeking leads that could close open cases. One of those segments, called "Missing," produced in partnership with The Center for Missing and Exploited Children, has generated tips that helped locate three kids, all found alive, Bryant said.

In late March, for example, the show helped find a young Texas girl, Mariah Martinez, who had been missing for almost two years. Authorities located her in New Mexico less than a week after the segment aired, Bryant said.

Viewers have taken their engagement offline as well. Following a January episode in which Slidell, La., police officers stopped a homeless man who had an attachment warrant against him for unpaid fines — they let him off with a warning — a call went out to #LivePDNation to help so the man wouldn't be arrested if he were stopped again.

“The man owed $600 in fines from a previous trespassing misdemeanor,” Bryant said. “He didn’t have the money to cover them, and two viewers paid them off.”

Read More | New Orleans Times-Picayune: Twitter Users Answer 'Live PD' Call [with video]

A&E sibling Lifetime is no doubt banking on those passionate fans to tune in to and engage with Women on Patrol when Live PD wraps season two in June. The spinoff won’t be live, but will be hoping to generate the kind of live engagement Live PD has enjoyed. It has already begun building a Twitter presence around #WomenOnPatrol, and its @WomenOnPatrol handle garnered about 300 followers in its first two weeks.

Produced by Big Fish Entertainment, Women on Patrol will premiere June 4 and will feature female law enforcement officers (#LadyLEOs) from counties in Wyoming, North Carolina, Arizona and California.

MCN Original Video: One-on-One in 2 With Live PD’s Dan Abrams

   

Author: Chelsea Anderson
Posted: May 23, 2018, 2:37 pm
The author is membership program director of the National Federation of Community Broadcasters. NFCB commentaries are featured regularly at www.radioworld.com. Hurricane season in the Atlantic region starts June 1. With it should come a time for community radio to tally its readiness to help its ...

Recent national talks on emergencies may prompt action

The author is membership program director of the National Federation of Community Broadcasters. NFCB commentaries are featured regularly at www.radioworld.com.

Hurricane season in the Atlantic region starts June 1. With it should come a time for community radio to tally its readiness to help its audience when it needs a station most.

Many media organizations are stepping up to give your radio station the tools it needs.

The innovative public media leaders of Native Public Media just concluded their Native Broadcast Summit. Tribal broadcasters from around the United States descended on Chandler, Ariz., to talk about the future of Native American noncommercial broadcasting. The present, where many of these predominantly communities are affected by wildfires, drought and other disasters, was also very much part of the discourse.

To its credit, NPM is focused on emergency preparedness because these stations and towns need community media as never before. A host of national organizations is coming to terms with just how crucial radio is in moments where calamity strikes. So are lawmakers. In Texas, for example, Rep. Vincente Gonzalez is calling for support, because the loss of a station would diminish his community’s responsiveness. Radio's ubiquity is still meaningful. That presence means a lot when hurricanes, tornadoes and even incidents of mass violence grip a city.

Yes, emergencies are more than storms. And they can strike anywhere at anytime.

Days before the Native Broadcast Summit, at NFCB’s Regional Summit in Grand Rapids, Mich., emergency preparedness was also on the agenda. There, longtime media responders Michael Beach and John Groundwater, who were instrumental in supporting community stations in Puerto Rico and other locales to get back on the air after disasters, as well as Tanya-Marie Singh, CEO of St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Island’s WTJX(FM/TV), spoke about action during these moments. They also sought to teach community radio managers and others how to integrate emergency planning at all levels of a station’s operations. Considering how often emergencies arise in every location, such instruction serves many stations well.

[Read: Months After Hurricane, WTJX Fights On]

If you’re not in a hurricane zone, chances are you are in a community that could face any number of issues. Maybe all these dialogs can be your motivation to understand how your community radio station can help your town at a time of need.

For a few stations, the ability to respond may hinge on fundamental questions of scale. The Federal Communications Commission’s test of the Emergency Alert System revealed a patchwork of issues. Equipment problems, out-of-date software and audio difficulties were high on the list. LPFM stations were among the largest constituencies with the completion challenges.

Needless to say, if you are not familiar with FCC emergency protocols, or if you aren’t sure if your broadcast systems are poised and ready to go, quiet times are the right times to check. Nothing can be as frustrating as finding out your systems don’t do what you expect them to do just when you need them the most.

[Read: Community Broadcaster: Saying Goodbye to Mignon]

Gear hiccups aside, for virtually every station, emergency preparedness is about communication, planning and collaboration. As an educational broadcast outlet, your noncommercial station serves a vital purpose to your area residents. And local officials are generally quite happy to work with your organization in the interests of keeping everyone safe. Many community radio stations like northern California’s KWMR(FM), have strong relationships with the city and its first responders. The station even has a webpage collecting relevant phone numbers, Twitter feeds and other contacts in case a listener has an emergency or needs information about one.

If your community radio station is not familiar with your state’s Emergency Alert System leadership, maybe it is time to reach out and talk.

Then there is the programming standpoint. How does your station look to comprehensively cover a disaster? How do you go beyond call-in programs and provide your listeners a deeper, more contextual conversation in incidents where, in some cases, people have lost everything? NPR shared how it covered the Paris terrorist attacks, using live coverage, explainers, social media and other resources to give audiences the full depth of the story. Although your community radio station may not have the same capacity, certainly there are a few valuable lessons to be gleaned.

Community radio serves such a vital purpose to so many people. Emergency preparation is just another matter in which community media can shine. As national broadcast discussions continue to build, it is time for your station to take a place at the table.

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Author: Ernesto Aguilar
Posted: May 26, 2018, 12:53 am
NEWBURY PARK, Calif., May 25, 2018 - Platinum Tools (www.platinumtools.com), the leader in solutions for the preparation, installation, hand termination and testing of wire and cable, is proud to announce the new Xpress Jack Termination Kit (p/n 90175) is now available and will be showcased during ...

NEWBURY PARK, Calif., May 25, 2018 - Platinum Tools (www.platinumtools.com), the leader in solutions for the preparation, installation, hand termination and testing of wire and cable, is proud to announce the new Xpress Jack Termination Kit (p/n 90175) is now available and will be showcased during InfoComm 2018, held from June 6-8 at the Las Vegas Convention Center, booth C3445.

“The Xpress Jack Termination Kit makes keystone jack terminations easier than ever,” explained Jason Chesla, Platinum Tools marketing manager. “With the Cat5/6 Cable Jacket Stripper and the Scissor-Run Electrician’s Scissors to prep your cable, and the Xpress Jack Punchdown tool, this kit makes terminating your Keystone Jacks an efficient and expedient process.”

With an MSRP of $189.00, the kit also includes a hanging tool pouch, and ten blue Keystone Cat6 110 Jacks and ten white Keystone Cat6 110 Jacks.

For additional pricing and more information on Platinum Tools and its complete product line, please visit www.platinumtools.com, call (800) 749-5783, or email info@platinumtools.com.

Platinum Tools, founded in 1997, was created based upon two very simple objectives. First, develop the absolute best possible solutions for the preparation, installation, and hand termination of wire and cable. Second, implement an operational infrastructure that can deliver these products in an efficient, timely, and high quality manner.

All of our products must absolutely satisfy three critical benchmark criteria…utility of function; quality of function; and economic value. Our people are our company. They, too, must be focused on and work to satisfy three critical benchmark criteria…customer satisfaction; product knowledge and expertise; and willingness to learn and adapt.

# # #

Author: CRL Public Relations
Posted: May 25, 2018, 6:24 pm
Much like restaurants, new radio stations open almost every day. Unfortunately, most fail within their first five years on the air. So when a radio station keeps serving up tasty music for several generations of locals, that’s something to celebrate. In Philadelphia, observing WMMR (FM)’s 50th ...

Learn from a half-century of great radio programming and talent

Much like restaurants, new radio stations open almost every day. Unfortunately, most fail within their first five years on the air. So when a radio station keeps serving up tasty music for several generations of locals, that’s something to celebrate.

In Philadelphia, observing WMMR (FM)’s 50th birthday is a responsibility that current Program Director Bill Weston takes seriously.

“I wake up in the middle of the night thinking, ‘Am I doing enough?’ There’s no budget line for station birthdays, but this is an historic moment. I’m pretty sure this is the longest-lived rock station in America.”

Rodney Dangerfield was among the many celebrities who have stopped in.

Radio historians recognize those WMMR call letters as the last of the so-called “underground” rock stations built by MetroMedia Broadcasting in the late ’60s. Others included legendary stations that have long since passed, like KMET/Los Angeles, the original KSAN in San Francisco, and WNEW in New York. WMMS in Cleveland started rocking around the same time and still is doing so today, but — unlike WMMR — it had a couple of music format detours along the way.

Although Weston has been at the helm for 14 of those 50 years, and WMMR has been ranked #1 among 25–54 year-olds most of that time, he’s humble.

“The real geniuses are people who came before like Joe Bonadonna, George Harris, Jeff Pollack, Charlie Kendall, Dick Hungate and many others. I just made the right morning show hire,” he says, referring to WMMR’s popular “Preston & Steve.”

Pierre Robert and Bill Weston.

He’s equally proud of his first major hire, Jaxon in afternoons, and of one of his newest, “a crazy guy” named Jacky Bam Bam at night. Having a live overnight DJ like Brent Porsche is rare these days, one of the many ways that current owner Beasley Media Group gives WMMR its full support.

Anchoring many of the yearlong celebration’s events is WMMR’s past, present and future midday DJ Pierre Robert, a 36-year WMMR veteran. On Sunday, April 29, Weston logged 50 songs for Robert’s 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. shift — the most-played songs from each year of WMMR’s existence.

Tom Petty visited WMMR.   

“That was the plan,” says Weston, “but he was on for 11 hours straight, and every minute of it was amazing. Pierre took calls about listeners’ favorite ’MMR memories, played old airchecks of — for example — the afternoon DJ in 1970 with a hippy-dippy delivery, old commercials and artist interviews. His producer Pancake helped, and our music coordinator Sarah Parker operated social media. I couldn’t turn off the radio all day, no one could. I was so proud.”

Of course, with 50 years of great radio from which to draw, Robert probably could have gone on forever. He could recall how he used to dangle a live microphone out of the window at WMMR’s original studio on historic Rittenhouse Square. Or how General Manager L. David Moorhead gained the on-air nickname “L. Nuclear Warhead.” He could tell the story about when Bruce Springsteen guest DJed, or when Tom Petty autographed an LP for DJ Steven Clean adding a note of gratitude, “Thanks for the checks!”

Nighttime DJ Michael Tearson, right, greets Jerry Garcia.

Programmer Jerry Stevens hired longtime nighttime DJ Michael Tearson in 1970, and Tearson says the early WMMR staffers were well aware they were creating a new art form. “Album rock radio had no history and no rules. The very way we spoke on the air, in natural voices instead of the contrived ‘radio voices’ of the time, was revolutionary.”

Original MTV VJ Mark Goodman, now hosting on Sirius XM’s “Volume” channel, grew up listening to WMMR. “People like Michael Tearson, Ed Sciaky and the others … Those were the guys that I looked up to and I wanted to be.”

Goodman eventually got his chance, first as an intern and then as a fledgling DJ. He honed his interview skills on the many rock stars who visited. One of his first interviews — and hers — was a young Pat Benatar.

Goodman’s most emotional moment on WMMR came soon after. In June of 1979, he interviewed singer/songwriter Lowell George of Littlefeat at a club in nearby New Jersey. On the very next evening, George died of a cocaine overdose.

“I came on the air with Bonadonna to announce what had happened, but I was crying,” says Goodman. “I was so devastated. He was one of my heroes.”

Weston sees a bright future for WMMR, one that continues to embrace its past. “People think the station’s archives are in a tidy little warehouse that everything’s alphabetized, and nothing could be further from the truth.”

But he says the 50th birthday has encouraged them to dig around and find some treasures. “A couple months ago, Pierre started a feature every day at 1:30, a song from the ’MMR-chives. It’s fun to hear, for example, a live acoustic performance of ‘A Horse with No Name.’”

Weston is also making sure WMMR is accessible wherever people listen in 2018 and beyond. “With [consultant] Fred Jacobs’ help, our apps activate on the car dashboard, Alexa plays our content, and Beasley is very forward-thinking about audio on demand.”

So happy birthday, ’MMR! With big personalities, the best rock (both new and old), and a finger on the pulse of pop culture, there will be many more.

After 9-1/2 years as the architect of LA’s “100.3 The Sound,” Dave Beasing’s new branded podcasts are garnering record downloads. Subscribe to his blog “Buzz From Beasing” at SoundThatBrands.com.

Comment on this or any story to radioworld@nbmedia.com.

Author: Dave Beasing
Posted: May 25, 2018, 5:04 pm
Rich Zwiebel, AIMS Install Working Group Chair, to Lead Seminar on Implementing Interoperability Standards for IP Audio and Video BOTHELL, Wash. — May 25, 2018 — As part of its promotion of a standards-based approach for the adoption of IP audio and video, the Alliance for IP Media Solutions (AIMS) ...

Rich Zwiebel, AIMS Install Working Group Chair, to Lead Seminar on Implementing Interoperability Standards for IP Audio and Video

BOTHELL, Wash.May 25, 2018 — As part of its promotion of a standards-based approach for the adoption of IP audio and video, the Alliance for IP Media Solutions (AIMS) today announced that AIMS’ Install Working Group Chair, Rich Zwiebel, will lead a seminar at InfoComm 2018 titled “Interoperability Standards for IP-Based Audio and Video.”

The seminar is designed to give attendees a clear understanding of how to use standards in their products, designs, and systems. The session will include a technical discussion of AIMS-endorsed standards, specifically AES67 and SMPTE ST 2110.

The two-hour seminar will begin at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, June 5, at the Westgate Hotel Las Vegas in Pavilion 10.

Rich Zwiebel is currently the chair of the AIMS Install Working Group and is V.P. of Systems Strategy at QSC Audio. He formerly served as chairman of the Media Networking Alliance (MNA) before MNA’s merger with AIMS earlier this year. The merger combined both organizations’ years of work related to the adoption of AES67. The MNA had been supporting AV network interoperability via the use of AES67 in the install and live systems markets, while AIMS had been doing similar work as part of its promotion of IP-based video standards in the media and entertainment industry. The merger of the two organizations, known collectively as AIMS resulted in the formation of one entity promoting interoperable IP audio and video solutions.

“AIMS is devoted to fostering the adoption of recognized standards. With the ratification of SMPTE ST 2110, it’s more important than ever to understand how all the standards work together and how best to implement them,” said Michael Cronk, AIMS board chair. “We encourage anyone investigating or responsible for transporting audio and video over networks — whether an engineer or a networking professional — to attend this session and learn more about building solutions for a successful transition to IP.”

In addition to the seminar, on Wednesday, June 6, AIMS will host a reception for members, the press, and anyone interested in interoperability standards for IP. The reception will be held at the Las Vegas Convention Center in Room N250 at 5:30 p.m.

InfoComm 2018 will take place June 2-8 in Las Vegas.

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About the Alliance for IP Media Solutions
The Alliance for IP Media Solutions (AIMS) is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to the education, awareness, and promotion of industry standards for the transmission of video, audio, and ancillary information over an IP infrastructure, as well as products based on those standards. The group represents the interests of both broadcast and media companies and technology suppliers that share a commitment to facilitating the industry’s transition from SDI to IP through industry standards and interoperable solutions that enable the rapid evolution to open, agile, and versatile production environments.

Link to Word Doc: www.wallstcom.com/AIMS/180525AIMS.docx 

Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: May 25, 2018, 2:48 pm
BRUSSELS — As part of the “Tournée Minérale” campaign, commercial radio station Joe persuaded much of its audience to join its “no alcohol-month” group. On Wednesday Feb. 28, to celebrate the conclusion of the month-long campaign, Joe broadcast its evening drive from an underwater on-air studio. ...

Station goes live from swimming pool as a grand finale to month-long no alcohol campaign

BRUSSELS — As part of the “Tournée Minérale” campaign, commercial radio station Joe persuaded much of its audience to join its “no alcohol-month” group. On Wednesday Feb. 28, to celebrate the conclusion of the month-long campaign, Joe broadcast its evening drive from an underwater on-air studio.

“Tournée Minérale” was launched last year by the Stichting tegen Kanker (the Foundation Against Cancer) and the DrugLijn (Drug Line), which promotes February as “alcohol-free” month.

Joe presenters prepared for the project with a four-week diving course. All pics courtesy of Medialaan.

View the 4 images of this gallery on the original article

For Joe, Rani De Coninck and Raf Van Brussel, weekday presenters from 4 to 7 p.m., became the advocates of the initiative, convincing listeners to join their group. In turn, the radio-tandem then faced a special defy — to broadcast from underwater at the end of the challenge. This year, in total, more than 100,000 people registered and participated in the special event.

To celebrate the campaign’s conclusion, the station organized an underwater broadcast. The technical aspects for show were developed by Medialaan Radio project engineer Iann Castelein, with visual support from Medialaan Production Facilities’ project engineers Frank Santermans and Hans Van Kerckhoven.

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In the Nemo 33 diving center the world’s second deepest indoor diving pool the Joe team installed an on-air studio in a diving bell, at a depth of 5 meters in the 33-meter deep pool.

DIVING BELL

The bell was set up for the broadcast of a one-hour radio show and the presenters were equipped with Sennheiser HMD26 headset-mics and tablets displaying the program schedule.

“All equipment (mics, headsets, tablets, cameras) were packed in waterproof Peli-cases.” (Pelican?)The station installed a waterproof Wi-Fi access point inside the underwater bulb, creating a local Wi-Fi network serving the presenter’s tablets.

“The diving bell studio’s signal is connected over fiber to our MLO1 outside broadcast van’s radio setup using a Lawo MC²36 console. The content was returned to the mobile radio set-up, next to the diving pool, and then channeled to the main Medialaan studio using a Prodys ProntoNet codec plus a redundant Mayah Centauri 3001 ISDN codec back-up connection,” explained Boone.

“The mobile studio is equipped with a Studer OnAir 3000 console and a Dalet+ playout system.” Both the mobile radio studio and the mobile video truck connected to the Medialaan broadcast center using PSTN intercom lines.

The underwater broadcast was also captured by eight cameras serving Joe’s website, app, YouTube and Facebook Live video streaming using a WMT video codec. The underwater camera footage was directed from the OB van’s control room with a SynchroSound Aqua IIB underwater speaker in the pool giving instructions to the diver.

In the weeks preceding the Tournée Minérale event, presenters Rani and Raf took diving courses in the Nemo diving center.

On Feb. 28, some 100 Joe listeners witnessed Raf and Rani’s live broadcast from the diving center. During the one-hour underwater program, presenters Sven Ornelis and Anke Bukinckx were the “dry-hosts” in the mobile studio. The program’s playlist featured water-related tracks like Abba’s “Waterloo” and Dire Straits’ “Twisting by the Pool.”

“The biggest challenge was broadcasting from an underwater studio, in a glass sphere bowl, where temperatures exceed 35 degrees Celsius and there is 100 percent humidity.” said Castelein. “This is not at all evident.” In addition to the audio, Joe also had two cameras in the sphere capturing images for live feeds and streams.

“Outside the diving bell, a cameraman operated a RED camera. In total, we had a technical crew of 15 people working here for a week, so this event was quite a big production,” Boone added.

Author: Marc Maes
Posted: May 25, 2018, 8:06 am
The author is chairman of Digital Radio Mondiale. GUEST COMMENTARY How important is the role of broadcast regulators and do we need them? Some people think so. Recently we met with representatives of an important African regulator interested in the digitization of radio in their country. The ...

What is their place in the ever more complex world of broadcasting?

The author is chairman of Digital Radio Mondiale.

GUEST COMMENTARY

How important is the role of broadcast regulators and do we need them? Some people think so.

Recently we met with representatives of an important African regulator interested in the digitization of radio in their country. The organization’s information gathering tour seemed to be far-reaching and well planned and their objective huge: To propose an appropriate radio digital solution for the foreseeable future.

Ruxandra Obreja is chairman of Digital Radio Mondiale.

One way of doing this is to look at what others are doing. This however raises many questions due to the unique aspects of each country. For example, is Norway and its DAB+ decision the right model for large, geographically and ethnically diverse territories like many African countries? Or would DRM, which can be used in all bands, be more appropriate, emulating what is happening in India? Or maybe the use of both standards is the right solution. Whatever the answer, each regulator has the responsibility to make these decisions based on its own country specifics and can’t necessary apply what is working well elsewhere.

It struck me that broadcast regulators come in different shapes and sizes and with diverse names. A cursory look at the list of world regulators shows them to be commissions, councils, offices, even institutes or full ministries. In their great majority they are though “authorities” that regulate terrestrial broadcasting, telecommunications, often postal services and in some few, bizarre cases are paired with transport (Tajikistan) or other branches of government like internal affairs (Japan).

[Read: DRM Receivers Find Place in the Car]

Some of them are well known, like the FCC in the United States, Ofcom in the United Kingdom and Bundesnetzagentur (BNA) in Germany. Other regulators are just starting to make their mark, such as TRAI, the regulator in India. Recently TRAI was in the news owing to a strong recommendation it published on the digitization of VHF and of radio itself in India. This certainly brought the Indian organization to the attention of the broadcasting sector and industry. But it is only a recommendation. Broadcasters and, ultimately, the Ministry will have to take the final decision. It also serves as a good example of where regulators often sit: between politicians, broadcasters, industry and users.

So, what are regulators for? The answers vary hugely. They seem to be advisor and enforcer, in equal measure. They propose solutions, inform policies that come then back to them, often changed, and which they have to implement by transforming them into regulations. On a day-to-day basis, they often manage spectrum, licenses and police the whole eco-system independently or sometimes at the behest of the day’s government.

The power of regulators — on paper at least — is wide-ranging, as they roughly regulate one of the most dynamic, influential and lucrative areas of current human activity, i.e. communication, or part of it. They also administer one of the invisible but most valuable national assets, spectrum. A frequently asked question is how independent they are. Whether they are “star-gazers” or “spectrum policemen” depends a lot on the democratic strength of the system in which they operate and on how they are funded (government, industry, combination of the two). It is certainly not easy to be technology or politically neutral.

Lately regulators have faced two extra challenges. One has to do with the vast area they do not regulate, the whole Internet, social media domain. The FCC is contemplating changing or even lifting the ownership caps — the number of radio stations that can be owned by one individual or entity in one area, which has been unchanged for a long time.

One argument put forward is that deregulation is needed for broadcasters to compete with Facebook, Google and other unregulated digital companies eating into the finite advertising pie. Otherwise, some believe radio, in particular, will die. So, deregulation and fair competition with investment in local and live content and new technology will guarantee its future and maintain its unique essence, is one of the strong opinions expressed in the U.S. We will see how this pans out in June and if deregulation can boost radio and strengthen its localism, diversity, the live element that listeners value. FCC might be searching for a compromise.

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In the U.K., Ofcom CEO Sharon White threw her weight fully behind another sector under siege from companies like Facebook, Google, Netflix: the public broadcasters. In March 2018 she referred mainly to TV but her admission is wide-ranging: “in any sector, regulation can only go so far. And in the longer term, the value of terrestrial airwaves, …. will decline. That means that public service broadcasters must keep adapting for the digital age.” Her solution is cooperation.

The second challenge faced by regulators, alongside the changing landscape in which they operate with a shrinking portfolio, is to do with time itself. Often their preferred and totally sensible solutions and decisions become obsolete over time. Ofcom, like many other regulators, realizes that it needs to support not only the bigger public and commercial broadcasters but also the local, commercial or community stations, which keep the flame and essence of radio alive.

And these local players certainly give regulators in the U.K. and elsewhere, embarking on digitization, a headache. At first, they were often not included in the planned digital future and were kept quietly in their analog stable. Then they started creating problems especially in countries where a multiplex solution is favored. In the U.K. a small-scale version of DAB has been tested and retested since 2012 in order to give DAB full national preeminence.

Tests continue, as more results are required, and the Ministry of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) is now considering how to proceed with the integration of the smaller digital players, for which DRM also offers an alternative by using the FM band or band III and maintain the existing channelization and, possibly, infrastructure. So far, DCMS has not made any announcement but the consensus seems to be to keep analog and digital. A possible compromise and also a delay for digital.

Regulators have the unenviable task of listening to all parties with an open mind. Then they must remain neutral and nimble. Otherwise they face the danger of losing broadcast land to regulate, time to implement and ultimately, relevance and independence. 

Author: Ruxandra Obreja
Posted: May 25, 2018, 7:46 am
Allows Residents to Answer and Unlock the Front Door from Intercom Compatible RTI Controllers SHAKOPEE, Minn. — May 24, 2018 — RTI, a leading control and automation manufacturer for residential and commercial settings, today announced integration with Channel Vision Technology’s Elite Series ...

Allows Residents to Answer and Unlock the Front Door from Intercom Compatible RTI Controllers

SHAKOPEE, Minn. — May 24, 2018 — RTI, a leading control and automation manufacturer for residential and commercial settings, today announced integration with Channel Vision Technology’s Elite Series SI-8000 front door station, allowing it to be used with RTI control devices featuring intercom capabilities.

Channel Vision’s SI-8000 features a built-in IP camera that allows residents to receive video calls when visitors ring the doorbell, while an integrated strike provides the capability to unlock the door. This brings the front door station into the RTI ecosystem, allowing residents to answer and unlock the door from intercom-compatible RTI controllers. Full support for video intercom is supported on the KX10 in-wall touchpanel and CX10 countertop/under-cabinet touchpanels. In addition, RTI’s KX3 and KX7 in-wall touchpanels, CX7 countertop/under-cabinet touchpanel, and flagship T3x remote control, provide audio intercom capabilities when integrated with the SI-8000.

“We are extremely pleased to have Channel Vision as an integration partner,” said Mike Everett, vice president of Global Sales, RTI. “By combining Channel Vision’s popular IP front door station and the RTI control environment, our dealers can offer their clients the added convenience and security they desire.”

“This is our first partner integration, and we couldn’t be more pleased for it to be with RTI, the control platform of choice for many installers,” said Darrel Hauk, president and CEO of Channel Vision Technology. “We are especially excited for integration with the CX10 touchpanel and can’t wait to see video calls on its WXGA-resolution LCD screen.”

More information about RTI is available at www.rticorp.com.

Visit RTI at InfoComm 2018, Booth N422

# # #

About RTI

With a 25-year heritage of innovation, RTI delivers the connected world to users’ fingertips via advanced control and automation systems for residential and commercial applications. The company’s award-winning solutions let users take complete control over their home or business with ease, bringing together entertainment, distributed A/V, lighting, climate, security, and more into one simple user interface. For dealers, RTI’s systems are backed by the company's renowned Integration Designer programming software, which allows them to deliver a completely customized control experience and powerful third-party integration.

Guided by a passion for redefining the limits of engineering, the RTI portfolio of powerful, yet affordable, central processors, A/V distribution products, Apple and Android™ apps, in-wall touchpanels, and beautiful handheld remotes deliver smart and reliable control in elegant form factors. Part of the RTI family of innovative control solutions, the Pro Control line of easy-to-program handheld remote controls, control processors, and ProPanel app are engineered with RTI's advanced capabilities built-in and bring unprecedented value to professionally installed electronic systems. Together, RTI and Pro Control are setting the standard for enhanced, fully customizable control and automation solutions for every application.

More information is available at www.rticorp.com and www.procontrol.com.

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Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: May 24, 2018, 6:41 pm
BEAVERTON, Oregon — May 24, 2018 — Biamp Systems, a leading provider of innovative, networked media systems, has announced that On The Road Marketing (OTRM) will be the company’s independent representative throughout the North Eastern U.S., representing the Vocia family of products. “We’re excited ...

BEAVERTON, Oregon — May 24, 2018 — Biamp Systems, a leading provider of innovative, networked media systems, has announced that On The Road Marketing (OTRM) will be the company’s independent representative throughout the North Eastern U.S., representing the Vocia family of products.

“We’re excited for the opportunities this new partnership brings,” said Michael Frank, sales development director, Eastern North America at Biamp Systems. “On The Road Marketing’s in-house design expertise in public address, mass notification, and emergency evacuation systems will deliver a key focus throughout the region.”

For more than 30 years OTRM has brought its extensive knowledge and expertise to the region beginning in music and live sound. The company quickly expanded into the professional audio and video industry, partnering with and representing leading manufacturers in both the music and the AV industry.

“We pride ourselves on partnering with the highest-quality manufacturers in the AV industry, and Biamp’s Vocia product line is a result of this commitment, enabling OTMR to provide robust solutions to our customers throughout the North Eastern United States,” said Mark Meding, principal at On The Road Marketing. “We’re excited to be part of the Biamp family and for what the future will bring.”

More information about Biamp Systems is available at . For more information about On The Road Marketing, visit www.otrmktg.com.

Visit Biamp Systems at InfoComm 2018, Booth C1954

# # #

About Biamp Systems

Biamp Systems, LLC is a leading provider of innovative, networked media systems that power the world’s most sophisticated audio/video installations. The company is recognized worldwide for delivering high-quality products and backing each one with a commitment to exceptional customer service.

Biamp is dedicated to creating products that drive the evolution of communication through sight and sound. The award-winning Biamp product suite includes: Tesira media system for digital audio and video networking, Devio collaboration tool for modern workplaces, Audia digital audio platform, Nexia digital signal processors, and Vocia networked public address and voice evacuation system. Each has its own specific feature set that can be customized and integrated in a wide range of applications, including corporate boardrooms, conference centers, huddle rooms, performing arts venues, courtrooms, hospitals, transportation hubs, campuses and multi-building facilities.

Founded in 1976, Biamp is headquartered in Beaverton, Oregon, USA, with additional engineering operations in Brisbane, Australia and Rochester, New York. For more information on Biamp, please visit www.biamp.com.

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Follow Biamp Systems

Blog: http://blog.biamp.com/

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Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: May 24, 2018, 6:05 pm
NextRadio said it has launched FM radio streaming capabilities in Mexico for all smartphones, including an iOS version for iPhone mobile device users there. “NextRadio is still committed to unlocking the FM chip in all phones but wanted to offer consumers the choice to listen to live local radio ...

App offers streaming option for smartphones including iPhone users

NextRadio said it has launched FM radio streaming capabilities in Mexico for all smartphones, including an iOS version for iPhone mobile device users there.

“NextRadio is still committed to unlocking the FM chip in all phones but wanted to offer consumers the choice to listen to live local radio on any phone,” it stated in a press release. “NextRadio developed a streaming version until this goal becomes a reality.”

[Read: TagStation Builds a Radio Attribution Ecosystem]

The app normally uses the enabled FM chip in certain Android devices to tune to local FM stations; now it adds the option to stream on unsupported devices.

“We’re thrilled that NextRadio is now available for use on both iOS and Android devices in Mexico,” said Paul Brenner, president of parent entity TagStation. “We want to empower all users to enjoy local FM radio without having their content restricted by geographic location or choice of device.”

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Author: Paul McLane
Posted: May 24, 2018, 5:50 pm
Cumulus Media has appointed Doug Harvill as vice president and market manager for its San Francisco cluster and named Kelly Harlow as digital sales manager and local sales manager for Indianapolis. Harvill most recently served as senior vice president and market manager of CBS Radio San Francisco ...

Harvill named VP/ market manager and Harlow named digital/local sales manager, respectively

Doug Harvill

Cumulus Media has appointed Doug Harvill as vice president and market manager for its San Francisco cluster and named Kelly Harlow as digital sales manager and local sales manager for Indianapolis.

Harvill most recently served as senior vice president and market manager of CBS Radio San Francisco for 12 years. Prior to that, he was SVP and market manager for CBS Radio Sacramento, Calif., for approximately nine years.

Harlow most recently senior account executive for iHeartMedia Indianapolis. She previously served as a sales representative for Cumulus Indianapolis from 2008–2012. Harlow also served as regional digital sales specialist for iHeartMedia Indiana and Kentucky radio stations and was an account executive for CBS Radio Indianapolis.

Kelly Harlow

Cumulus combines local programming with nationally syndicated brands to deliver content through its 445 owned-and-operated stations broadcasting, approximately 8,000 broadcast radio stations affiliated with its Westwood One network and digital channels.

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Author: Emily M. Reigart
Posted: May 24, 2018, 5:33 pm
Sun & Fun Media has tapped radio affiliate sales exec Dennis Green to serve as the radio operations and marketing solutions company’s new chief revenue officer; a new position for the organization. Based in New York, Green will lead the development of new products and services for stations, as ...

Dennis Green has spent the past 22 years at Westwood One

Sun & Fun Media has tapped radio affiliate sales exec Dennis Green to serve as the radio operations and marketing solutions company’s new chief revenue officer; a new position for the organization.

Based in New York, Green will lead the development of new products and services for stations, as well as manage a team of six affiliate sales people.

Green the spent 22 years at Westwood One, where he most recently served as senior vice president of affiliate sales and broadcast operations. He also served as executive vice president of affiliate sales, VP of affiliate sales for talk programming, VP of broadcast operations and affiliate sales for Cumulus Media Networks.

Prior to that, Green headed multimedia syndication at Bloomberg in New York and was also director of affiliate sales and operations for the Illinois and Wisconsin Radio Networks.

Sun & Fun Media was established in 1996 and CEO Rob Koblasz was one of the co-founders. The organization has approximately 1,300 U.S. affiliates and is sold by Premiere Networks.

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Author: Emily M. Reigart
Posted: May 24, 2018, 5:25 pm
LynTec’s NPAC Delivers Leading Power Technology, Improves AVL Installation Efficiencies for Rebuild of the Multipurpose Theater Hit by Devastating Tornado LENEXA, Kan. — May 24, 2018 — LynTec, a leading manufacturer of innovative electrical power control solutions for professional audio, video, and ...

LynTec’s NPAC Delivers Leading Power Technology, Improves AVL Installation Efficiencies for Rebuild of the Multipurpose Theater Hit by Devastating Tornado

LENEXA, Kan. May 24, 2018 — LynTec, a leading manufacturer of innovative electrical power control solutions for professional audio, video, and lighting systems, announced that Louisiana Media Group (LMG) installed LynTec’s award-winning Networkable Power Automation Control (NPAC) rack-mounted system at Thomas Hall Theater at William Carey University in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. The 1,200-seat multipurpose theater was one of many buildings on the campus damaged by a tornado in January 2017.

View the 6 images of this gallery on the original article

Because of the tornado, all except one building on William Carey University campus suffered damage. The roof of the 1,200-seat Thomas Hall Theater was destroyed and subsequently required a complete renovation of the interior and the AVL systems. Since the theater hosts a wide variety of events, including plays, musical performances, educational classes, and chapel services, it was critical to restore the functionality to the space without sacrificing quality. LMG, a full-service AV company, oversaw the design and installation of the theater’s new audio system, including a state-of-the art digital mixing console.

Founded in 2011, LMG is a full-service AV company that specializes in working with the house of worship market. Its goal is to deliver leading sales, service, and installation expertise to their clients, leveraging the best technology available. The NPAC’s complete, ready-to-install power management solution enabled LMG to provide complete power protection, control, and sequencing capabilities right in the rack, eliminating the need for an outside electrician or subcontractor and saving project time and costs.

“This is a new chapter for the school,” said Mike Marchese, president of LMG. “They are rebuilding with the future in mind, and every decision made as part of that process has been critical, but time was definitely of the essence. When we saw the NPAC at InfoComm, we knew it would be the ideal power solution for the multipurpose venue. It not only gave us superb power control and sequencing for all the new gear going in, it also made the installation incredibly easy and sped up the timeline of the project by not having to wait for an electrician to come and wire in panels.”

Part of LynTec's networkable product lineup, the NPAC is the only rackmount solution of its kind to sequence on/off complex digital audio systems with easy-to-program extended step rates and time delays that guarantee proper component boot-up and shutdown automatically. It features four 20A circuit inputs in a single 2-RU enclosure and can manage up to 80 amps in a single 2-RU unit. The NPAC series includes four models — 120V or 240V to manage higher voltage loads — and features four 20-amp circuit inputs, with 4 or 8 relays, in a single 2RU enclosure, saving integrators valuable rack space over 4RU systems and eliminating the need to wire multiple units together.

Circuits can fire in any order required, even from unit to unit, with no extra wiring required as long as each NPAC is connected to the network. Outlets can be controlled individually or as a sequenced group with up to 12 zones across 10 units. The unit boasts pre-terminated cables that are ready to plug into existing sources and four NEMA 5-20 outlets (6-20 outlets for the 240V model) that allow for easy connection to gear. An outbound relay (O/R) control option adds two single-pole, double-throw, 2-amp, low-voltage relays to allow users to also control external devices equipped with contact closures as part of their AV lighting (AVL) control platform.

“Getting the theater up and running as quickly as possible after the tornado was incredibly important,” said Mark Bishop, president of LynTec. “With the NPAC, LMG could keep the momentum going on the project. It solved the necessary power protection and control to its entire AVL outfit.”

More information on LynTec’s full line of products is available at www.LynTec.com. For more information about LMG, visit www.lmgav.com.

Visit LynTec at InfoComm 2018, Booth C1319

# # #

About LynTec

LynTec is a leading manufacturer of innovative electrical power control solutions for professional audio, video, and lighting systems. Working closely with system designers, LynTec incorporates electrical protection, circuit switching capabilities, and an operational controller within a common enclosure — saving valuable wall space, lowering installation costs, and simplifying system operation. This state-of-the-art approach to electrical control solutions has positioned LynTec as a trusted resource for any installation with complex power control requirements. More information is available at www.LynTec.com.

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Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: May 24, 2018, 5:06 pm
Not that long ago, having a “network” of transmitter sites to maintain meant having a long list of telephone numbers you would use to reach specific remote controls. Today, you likely have a list of IP addresses. What’s behind this evolution in technology? For starters, more and more remote sites ...

The IP revolution is opening up almost unlimited potential for remote control systems

Not that long ago, having a “network” of transmitter sites to maintain meant having a long list of telephone numbers you would use to reach specific remote controls. Today, you likely have a list of IP addresses.

What’s behind this evolution in technology? For starters, more and more remote sites have access to IP connectivity (either via the public internet or private IP links). Furthermore, transmitter manufacturers have added IP-based user interfaces, along with SMTP, user-configurable alarm generation and SNMP support for control and alarming to their product lines.

Solid-state transmitters have become more reliable over the last couple of decades; and now when they do experience failures, it’s often of a “soft” nature, involving one power supply, or one power amp, out of many. Power output is reduced, but the transmitter can keep on running. (If you are still using vacuum-tube transmitters, you should consider that.) This means that the engineer responsible for the site can essentially be farther away.

In reality it’s now more practical than ever to build a network operations center or NOC that can be used to gather information, and to provide control, to transmitter sites widely spread out geographically. That’s the topic of this article: use of remote monitor and/or control systems in a NOC environment.

CORTEX 360

Davicom recently introduced the Cortex 360. In addition to its normal, locally-based remote control functionality, Cortex 360 can be used in the construction of a widespread network of station control systems. I asked John Ahern, president of Comlab, the parent company of Davicom, about the new product.

Davicom’s new Cortex is a third-generation system, with a more contemporary GUI.

“The Cortex 360 is actually Davicom’s third generation of remote site management system. We started building these in the 1990s. We’ve incorporated many of the suggestions that have come from customers over the years, and we think we’ve added lots of capability that allow it to monitor and control stations with a great variety of equipment,” he said.

As one example, Cortex offers analog inputs that can measure up to 80 volts with excellent common mode rejection. Status inputs are also all provided with individual ground contacts — allowing the installer to keep all the various pieces of gear isolated from one another.

I asked him about the ultimate number of stations that could exist in a network made up of the Cortex 360 units.

“Well, there’s not really any limit. The unit itself is usually installed at a transmitter site, although lots of customers are using them at the studios as well,” he said. “If you’ve got a network, you can use a distributed architecture, where you’ve got one unit at each transmitter site, and one back at your studios, along with NOC software that sits at a central site, collecting information, building a database, and connecting to all the sites as required.”

So as a user, I could have a computer and a piece of software running that would go out and poll all the various sites during the day, however many times a minute I wanted to — in order to keep track of what’s going on — but that’s not the only option.

“That’s right — if you have at a central site, but some customers don’t really have that,” said Ahern. “They’ve got the network, but they’ve got local technicians or local engineers maintaining a certain cluster of sites in a town, and they want them to be able to access the units directly and locally, and that is one way of setting it up. You can have your NOC software that’s polling everything, or have it just waiting for information coming in from all the sites, and then it’s advising or notifying personnel that something’s going on.”

Regarding a dashboard display, Cortex 360 provides various options. “The Cortex 360 now operates on HTML5, so you don’t need any special software. You connect to the unit, after which you have access to the GUI that is user-programmed. You can see what is going on locally, but you can also access the NOC software and get an overall view; a map view of all your sites so that you can see what is going on in different regions.”

I asked how easy it would be to have engineers from the next closest company cluster provide vacation relief.

“Up to 16 different user accounts can access any particular unit, and you can fine-tune permissions for various levels of access. In other words, the ‘vacation relief’ would be able to access the device, but wouldn’t have any rights to make modifications,” he said.

For those new to the concept of SNMP, the letters stand for Simple Network Management Protocol. It was developed early, as part of the internet protocol suite, but has only come into regular use for broadcasting of the last dozen years or so. It is a means by which data can be read, and control provided, between an agent and a manager. SNMP “get” is a way to retrieve a logic state, or other data, from the far end (ideal for reading status and telemetry); “set” is a way to provide a remote command at the far end; and you can think of “traps” as alarms that are configured on the agent, and sent to the manager should they come into being.

One of the most important features of any remote control today is its SNMP capability. The Cortex 360 can act as both and agent and manager, with the capacity of 1,024 SNMP Gets, 1,024 Sets, and 1,024 traps.

WORLDCAST NMS MANAGER

Another option for those that need to monitor a network of remote transmitter sites is WorldCast’s NMS Manager. WorldCast’s U.S.-based engineering rep Tony Peterle discussed the basic hardware requirements with me.

Worldcast’s NMS Manager shows sites and status on a live map or other graphics, events and user tickets below.   

“With WorldCast Manager it depends on the scale of the operation. The operating system is Ubuntu server — I think it’s version 10.8 right now. We find that the OS is very light and efficient, and if you’re connecting 50 units or 100 units, you could probably get away with some fairly insubstantial hardware. If you need to go into the hundreds or thousands of units for monitoring then you might want to invest in something that’s more typical server hardware, with robust dual power supplies.”

For those who have used Audemat Control, or Relio before that, note that WorldCast Manager is designed to work with many different devices, not just remote controls also made by WorldCast.

“One of the significant things about WorldCast Manager is we determined from the onset of the development of this new platform that we were going to be vendor-agnostic,” Peterle said. “In our previous network management software we paid attention to both the Audemat side and the APT side for the codecs. We were very brand-specific.”

He continued, “This time we wanted to do something that was much more open and easier to configure and now we have already integrated into the software 350 to 400 devices from all different manufacturers all over the world. It’s very easy to integrate anything that speaks the SNMP protocol.”

Before getting systems such as the Cortex 360 or WorldCast NMS manager to “read” far-end devices via SNMP it’s necessary to pick out “objects” using what is known as their Object ID. These OIDs are identified by the user from a text file known as a MIB (short for management information base). Once the appropriate OIDs are identified, the system addresses them via “gets” and controls them via “sets.” Once a user becomes more familiar with this process, it isn’t hard to identify the OIDs needed.

If that sounds a bit complex to a beginner, WorldCast can help out. “That’s something that we can do for the customers free of charge — or if the customers have the tools to do that themselves so they can specifically adjust the software to give them the information deemed most important,” said Peterle.

“The other significant thing is that SNMP is not the be all and end all of the WorldCast Manager. We can speak other protocols as well like Modbus and CANBUS. We also have, both from our own catalog products and from the world market in I/O, a large set of edge devices that can convert older units that don’t support SNMP to systems that do,” said Peterle. “We have hardware that can convert data points like door sensors and smoke alarms into something that we can more easily network with and integrate into the overall monitoring scheme of the WorldCast Manager.”

I asked Peterle about connectivity requirements for use of WorldCast Managers. “It’s fairly limited. SNMP is a pretty lightweight protocol and the software gives the customer the opportunity or the ability to adjust the polling rate,” he said. “The WorldCast Manager can receive alarm messages from equipment in the field using traps or it can operate as an active polling device and just query parameters at certain intervals. The customer can adjust how often polling occurs, on a site-by-site basis, to compensate weak spots in the network.”

Finally, WorldCast Manager provides user-configured customized displays so that the user can see the status of your network, and to drill down to the critical issues when you do have problems.

It’s important to note that control capability (i.e., “set” commands) will be available in WorldCast Manager in Q3, delivery in September.

BURK AUTOPILOT WITH WARP ENGINE

The Burk Technology ARC Plus Touch, and its companion software AutoPilot, form a well-known remote control system used by many radio and TV stations in North America.

Burk Technology’s ARC Plus Touch screen in use at Golden West Broadcasting.

Chuck Alexander of Burk talked about a new standard feature of AutoPilot called Warp Engine. It enables fast, bandwidth-efficient, real-time monitoring of hundreds of ARC Plus or ARC Solo sites at a rate of 100 sites per second, with each site reporting as many as 32 status and/or meter values. Warp Engine requires less than 400 bytes per second of IP capacity for each monitored site. If communications bandwidth is at a premium cost, it can be further reduced by selection of a slower polling rate.

“Warp Engine communicates with one or multiple ARC Plus and ARC Solo systems,” he said. “A station can use AutoPilot to monitor and control individual sites, and not strictly transmitter controls, because we can interface with virtually everything at the site through a combination of distributed IO units, which communicate back to the ARC Plus over the IP network, and SNMP.”

Increasingly SNMP is used for direct, IP-based communication with any device in a system that supports the protocol. A centralized location running AutoPilot can monitor and control multiple ARC Plus or ARC Solo sites. “Our customers use it for network operation centers of all sizes at the market or regional or national level, so you could have 20, 30, or hundreds of stations monitored using AutoPilot, again communicating out to the ARC Plus systems at each site,” said Alexander.

Burk’s system architecture is based on the distributed intelligence of the ARC Plus. “We like to think of ARC Plus as an island of reliability. With an ARC Plus unit at the remote site, even if communications is lost between your central point and that remote site, normal operation can continue because of the automated capabilities of the ARC Plus for responding to off-air events and timed events like AM pattern changes.”

Alexander said that as a NOC grows and handles dozens if not hundreds of sites, efficiency of network communications protocols becomes more important.

“As you move toward the larger numbers of sites, going from 20 or 30 sites to 100, or 200, or 300, two factors become important. One is the efficiency of the communication both at the network operations center and the remote site. There’s a need for many of our users to be very efficient in bandwidth utilization and also efficient in computing capacity at the network operations center. We’ve designed a series of features, one of which is Warp Engine, to facilitate these very large NOCs.”

When the NOC needs to handle hundreds of sites, enabling Warp Engine switches from a TCP connection to connectionless UDP and uses very small UDP packets, polling at a fast rate — typically up to 100 sites per second, bringing back as many as 32 values per site. The user can configure those parameters if there is a need to use less bandwidth overall.

He also described the navigation pane as seen in the user interface for AutoPilot.

“If you do have a large network of stations then likely there’s some hierarchy that you will use to manage those stations. It might represent the hierarchy of engineering personnel with the responsibility perhaps — regional responsibility down to market responsibility. The user can create a network view that represents your management structure. Basically you’re just dragging and dropping folders to organize the way you look at your network; you might have a nation view and then three or four regional views, and inside each regional view there can be several market groupings, and these are all represented by folders in the left navigation pane.”

According to Alexander, that becomes particularly useful with another feature called summary status indicators, both at site and group levels.

“A summary indicator can be assigned for a particular site or folder of sites and it gives you a numeric and a color-based indication of everything at that group of sites,” he said. “Is everything good and green? Or do you have some number of red alarms or yellow alerts all summarized in the little block for that site or group? Warp Engine monitors hundreds of sites very fast, and if one of them comes up indicating alarm conditions then you can click on that site and establish a full TCP connection. Now while you’re monitoring all the other sites fast with UDP you can be in full communication with sites of particular interest using TCP connections, so you always have access to that control.”

As engineers get more and more spread out in their daily routines, the ability to “be in more than one place at the same time” becomes more and more important. Fortunately the tools needed to help you do just that are available now, and not expensive or hard to learn.

Comment on this article or suggest other topics for this series. Email radioworld@nbmedia.com with “Trends in Tech” in the subject line.

Doug Irwin, CPBE AMD DRB, is vice president of engineering at iHeartMedia in Los Angeles and a technical advisor to Radio World. His Trends in Technology columns will appear here regularly.

Author: Doug Irwin
Posted: May 24, 2018, 5:02 pm
The FCC will vote at its July public meeting on a proposal to make more "intensive" use of 500 MHz of midband spectrum in the 3.7–4.2 GHz (C Band). That is according to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, who announced the planned vote at the Wireless Infrastructure Association’s Connect Expo in Charlotte, ...

Says he wants to make more "intensive" use of midband spectrum

The FCC will vote at its July public meeting on a proposal to make more "intensive" use of 500 MHz of midband spectrum in the 3.7–4.2 GHz (C Band).

That is according to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, who announced the planned vote at the Wireless Infrastructure Association’s Connect Expo in Charlotte, N.C., May 23.

Cable operators use that band for thousands of receive-only earth stations.

[Read: FCC Wants Comments on Feasibility of Sharing C Band Spectrum]

That comes after the FCC earlier this month asked for input on how to repurpose C Band spectrum, seeking comment on a report it must prepare for Congress, mandated by the Making Opportunities for Broadband Investment and Limiting Excessive and Needless Obstacles to Wireless Act (Mobile Now Act).

"I’ve got some good news to report on the mid-band front," Pai told the WIA audience. "Last year, the FCC agreed to explore repurposing more midband spectrum, including the 3.7 to 4.2 GHz band, commonly called the 'C Band.' We have done a lot of work on this issue in the time since — enough so that I’m pleased to announce today that at the FCC’s July meeting, I intend to put up for a vote a proposal to make more intensive use of that 500 MHz of spectrum, including seeking additional input on making it available for commercial terrestrial use."

The chairman also said that, "when it comes to low-band spectrum," the post-incentive auction transition process for that 600 MHz spectrum is going "very well indeed." That includes the biggest auction winner, T-Mobile, already using its spectrum — it has paid some broadcasters who gave up spectrum in the auction to move off early — to provide mobile broadband in 28 states.

In August 2017, the FCC launched a notice of inquiry into 'next-generation' opportunities for use of "midband spectrum" — seeking to explore "all potential options to meet the ever-increasing demands" for wireless bandwidth. The NOI sought comment on three specific mid-range bands (3.7–4.2 GHz, as well as 5.925–6.425 GHz, and 6.425–7.125 GHz).

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Author: John Eggerton
Posted: May 24, 2018, 5:01 pm
Vendor Partners Collaborate on Strategies for U.S. Market SOUTHLAKE, Texas — May 24, 2018 — ProSource, the largest audio, video, and integration buying group in the United States, deployed a delegation of ProSource executives, board members, and committee members to Europe in order to cement ...

Vendor Partners Collaborate on Strategies for U.S. Market

SOUTHLAKE, Texas May 24, 2018 ProSource, the largest audio, video, and integration buying group in the United States, deployed a delegation of ProSource executives, board members, and committee members to Europe in order to cement strategic relationships with key audio partners. The team was selected to report on a complete overview of the high-end audio marketplace and meet with vendor partners to collaborate on strategies for the U.S. market. Meetings with AudioQuest, Focal, Klipsch, Marantz, MartinLogan, and Paradigm took place during the HIGH END® Munich Exhibition, preceeded by a visit to the engineering facility for Arcam, recently acquired by the Harman Luxury Audio group. In addition, the group toured the Naim headquarters and factory, as well as Focal’s cabinet factory in Bourbon-Lancy, France, and the Focal headquarters in Saint-Étienne, France.

The ProSource delegation included:

  • Bill Janka, Mission Audio Video
  • Brian Gibson, Elite Media Solutions
  • Dave Gilbert, Hi-Fi Sales
  • David Levitan, Audiolab
  • Greg Simmons, Eagle Sentry
  • Phil Murray and Steve Weiner, Listen Up
  • Stephanie Keough, World Wide Stereo
  • Tim Freeman and Tommy Kinstle, Crutchfield
  • Dave Workman, Andy Orozco and Jessica Paskon, ProSource

ProSource members joining the meetings in Munich included:

  • Will Hettinger, HiDEF Lifestyle
  • Bob Cole, World Wide Stereo
  • Jim Davis and Josh Bizar, Music Direct

“Our partnership with key audio vendors has substantially contributed to the success of the ProSource organization in the audio category,” said Dave Workman, CEO and President of ProSource. “Our recent visit to Europe was highly successful, and we learned a great deal about new and emerging technologies and brands from the experience.”

“I was proud to represent the ProSource board at the HIGH END Munich show and throughout the tour. It was inspiring to visit our vendor partners’ facilities and see their passion for performance audio, while observing the evolution of raw materials through the hands of skilled craftspeople to create an amazing finished product,” said William Janka, President and CEO of Mission Audio Video in Santa Barbara and ProSource board member.

“Our business meetings with ProSource members have always been meaningful and productive, so when an opportunity presented itself to meet in Munich, we were ‘all in.’ We are always learning something valuable from our partnership and especially appreciate the diversity of the group,” said Kevin Zarow, Vice President of Sales, CI/AVS, Sound United.

“During the ProSource journey to Munich, Germany, we had the opportunity to create lasting dialogue and foster collaborative discussions about advancing relationships that will set a course for the rest of the year. We were able to share our strategic vision and plan for focusing on higher margins, higher ASP, and restricted premium distribution while being immersed in the high-end audio environment,” added Paul Jacobs, CEO, Klipsch Group, Inc.

Information on membership in ProSource is available from Sherry Dantonio, Director of Membership, at 562-810-1706 or by email at Sherry.Dantonio@Prosourceinfo.com.

# # #

About ProSource

ProSource is a cooperative, member-owned, not-for-profit buying group representing more than 550 specialty retailers and custom integrators. With annual sales of more than $5 billion, ProSource is the largest specialty and consumer-electronics merchandising group in the United States, which allows it to negotiate stronger programs with manufacturers, help independent dealers stay relevant to consumers, and keep the specialty A/V channel competitive. For additional information go to www.prosourceinfo.com.

Video Collectionhttps://vimeo.com/album/5188203

SmugMug Albumhttps://prosource.smugmug.com/Europe-2018-Audio-Tour/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ProSourceInfo/

LinkedIn: http://bit.ly/ProSource_LinkedIn

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ProSourceInfo

Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: May 24, 2018, 1:20 pm
WUPPERTAL, Germany — May 24, 2018 — Riedel Communications once again provided a comprehensive communications and signal distribution infrastructure for the annual Viña del Mar International Song Festival, a world-famous live music event held Feb. 20-25 in Viña del Mar, Chile. Riedel's MediorNet ...

WUPPERTAL, GermanyMay 24, 2018 — Riedel Communications once again provided a comprehensive communications and signal distribution infrastructure for the annual Viña del Mar International Song Festival, a world-famous live music event held Feb. 20-25 in Viña del Mar, Chile. Riedel's MediorNet real-time media network provided redundant and decentralized signal routing and transport for the entire production, broadcast live from the Quinta Vergara Amphitheater. The production crew relied on Riedel’s Bolero wireless intercom solution and Artist digital matrix intercom system for all on-site communications, with intercom signals routed over MediorNet.

View the 3 images of this gallery on the original article

In its 59th year, the Viña del Mar International Song Festival is the largest and best-known music festival in Latin America, with more than 15,000 local spectators and an estimated global audience of 200 million. For the entire festival, which included 19 music programs, Chilevision produced the broadcast signal based on feeds supplied by partners Chilefilms and Intervideo and transported over Riedel’s robust, fiber-based signal and communications backbone.

“The logistical and production challenges of our festival continue to grow every year, as both our broadcast and live audiences demand an increasingly sophisticated experience. For the communications and signal-distribution infrastructure, we needed a partner that could handle the complexities and deliver a 100 percent bulletproof solution,” said Cristián Mena Foncea, Technical Coordinator, Viña del Mar International Song Festival 2018. “Riedel has an outstanding reputation for providing fail-safe communications for some of the world’s biggest and most high-profile events, and its solutions are world-renowned for their reliability and technical excellence. We knew we could depend on Riedel to provide a comprehensive solution that would meet all of our requirements.”

The Riedel backbone consisted of three MediorNet modular frames and 27 Artist digital matrix intercom panels in a decentralized configuration that provided fully redundant distribution of all intercom, video wall, and video signals throughout the festival venue. In a facility as large and complex as the Quinta Vergara Amphitheater, wireless communications can be challenging, but Bolero’s Advanced DECT Receiver (ADR) technology provided crystal-clear communications throughout the arena with only eight AES67-networked antennas. With 27 Bolero beltpacks deployed to the production team, the Bolero wireless intercom system enabled full roaming for the crew throughout the arena. Nine Riedel RiFace radio interfaces and 36 Performer C3 Partyline beltpacks provided additional connectivity for walkie-talkie users, allowing them to communicate with the Bolero users through a seamless integration with the Artist panels.

“Every year, the Viña del Mar International Song Festival outdoes itself with an ever more exciting lineup of talent, dazzling production elements, and eye-popping staging. It’s no wonder that this is one of Latin America’s oldest and most popular musical events,” said Angel González España, International Sales Manager, Latin America, Riedel Communications. “It was a privilege to provide a complete, end-to-end communications infrastructure that ensured a smooth and successful production, and we’re looking forward to supporting the festival into the future.”

Further information about Riedel and the company’s products is available at www.riedel.net.

# # #

About Riedel Communications

Riedel Communications designs, manufactures, and distributes pioneering real-time video, audio, data, and communications networks for broadcast, pro audio, event, sports, theater, and security applications. The company also provides rental services for radio and intercom systems, event IT solutions, fiber backbones, and wireless signal transmission systems that scale easily for events of any size, anywhere in the world. Riedel is headquartered in Wuppertal, Germany, and employs over 500 people in 19 locations throughout Europe, Australia, Asia, and the Americas.

All trademarks appearing herein are the property of their respective owners.

Follow Riedel:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RiedelCommunicationsInternational

Google+: https://plus.google.com/+RiedelNet

Twitter: https://twitter.com/RIEDELnet

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/549773

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/RiedelNet

Pinterest: http://de.pinterest.com/RIEDELnet/

Instagram: http://instagram.com/riedelcommunications

SlideShare: http://de.slideshare.net/RIEDELCommunications

Link to Word Doc: www.wallstcom.com/Riedel/180524Riedel.docx

Link to Photos: www.wallstcom.com/Riedel/Riedel-Vina-del-Mar-Festival-Photos.zip

Description of Photos: Riedel Communications provided a comprehensive communications and signal distribution infrastructure for the annual Viña del Mar International Song Festival.

Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: May 24, 2018, 12:33 pm
The WorldCast Manager from WorldCast Systems is an Enterprise Network Monitoring Solution (NMS) and Operation Support system (OSS). This product has been devised to provide a centralized and unified interface for the monitoring and management of all connected equipment across any network or ...

Monitors and manages connected gear across a network or facility

The WorldCast Manager from WorldCast Systems is an Enterprise Network Monitoring Solution (NMS) and Operation Support system (OSS). This product has been devised to provide a centralized and unified interface for the monitoring and management of all connected equipment across any network or facility.

Comprising what the company describes as “a comprehensive set of user modules and back office engines;” the WorldCast Manager uses industry standard protocols (such as SNMP), to provide efficient communication with connected devices regardless of their manufacturing origin.

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A single centralized database can display local, national or international installation details and flag up faults visually as they occur. The latest version of the system includes a ticket management system for the allocation of fault repairs, incident tracking and subsequent resolution.

Author: RW Staff
Posted: May 24, 2018, 9:25 am
Leading audio codec manufacturer Tieline Technology has announced the ViA Portable Remote Codec has been recognized as a prestigious Good Design Award® Winner in the Product Design category at the 60th Anniversary Good Design Awards ceremony in Sydney, Australia. The annual Good Design Awards is ...

Leading audio codec manufacturer Tieline Technology has announced the ViA Portable Remote Codec has been recognized as a prestigious Good Design Award® Winner in the Product Design category at the 60th Anniversary Good Design Awards ceremony in Sydney, Australia.

The annual Good Design Awards is Australia’s most prestigious Awards event recognizing outstanding product design and innovation and celebrates the best new products and services on the market.

“Tieline is thrilled to receive this prestigious award with Form Designs Australia as recognition for outstanding design and innovation,” said Will McLean, CEO Tieline Group of Companies. “Tieline worked closely with Form Designs Australia to create a best-in-class product and everyone involved from design through to manufacturing should be extremely proud of their efforts.”

The Awards attracted a record number of entries and the jury commented that ViA is “a simple to use, compact and portable codec for wireless remote broadcasting. The technology brings a radical change in the way radio and TV can broadcast from remote locations. Simple and effective design solutions coupled with a great attention to manufacturing details. Product is fit for purpose. The design of the molding, button and knob locations and connectors is effective and very nicely done. This product is handy for a broadcasting professional to keep for 'on the road' applications. Compact device that attempts to house all the necessary technology and connectors in the one neat and versatile package. Well done.”

“It was a pleasure working with Tieline on this project,” said Edward Khoury, Managing Director, Form Designs Australia. “We regard this award as a result of a team effort between Tieline’s technical, marketing and managing departments and without the close collaboration between Tieline and Form Designs this award would have never happened. Congratulations from Form Designs.”

For more information about Tieline codecs visit www.tieline.com.

Contact Tieline

  1. For Australia and International: info@tieline.com
  2. For USA, Canada & Latin America contact: sales@tieline.com

Or contact your favorite dealer for more information about Tieline codecs.

Author: Glenn Davies
Posted: May 24, 2018, 6:38 am
For this week’s Off the Beaten Path, we’re going to follow some “number links.” It’s kind of like David Letterman’s old “Top 10” lists, but these are just lists of items that begin with different numbers. 10 Close Calls You’ve heard the expression “Now THAT was a close one!” When you look at the ...

Well, top something, sort of

For this week’s Off the Beaten Path, we’re going to follow some “number links.” It’s kind of like David Letterman’s old “Top 10” lists, but these are just lists of items that begin with different numbers.

10 Close Calls

You’ve heard the expression “Now THAT was a close one!” When you look at the pictures on this link, you’ll say this more than one time. Here are 10 “Whew!” moments.

7 USB Stick Reuses

I’m not so sure I agree with the author’s thought that USB sticks are no longer popular. Nothing beats “sneaker-netting” like grabbing a thumb drive and moving the file from point A to point B “the old-fashioned way.” This link from USA Today has some very cool reuses for thumb drives. Though not a “spoiler alert,” I can also say this link is very useful if you are looking for some software that works very well when run off a thumb drive.

5 Free Programs to Completely Wipe Hard Drives

Like the link above with software related to USB memory sticks, here’s possible useful link on completely wiping a hard drive. This is useful if you have an old computer you are selling and want to be certain there is no personal data left behind. Keep in mind that simply deleting a file from a computer does nothing to prevent someone from pulling information from it.

20 Things We Don’t Do Anymore Due to Technology Changes

Technology changes all the time, and we adjust with it. We often forget about things we did in the past. For instance, anyone working in radio probably remembers changing ribbons (and black fingers) and fan-fold paper. Those over 60 might remember there once was a time when you’d pick up the phone and hear the neighbor talking. You’d have to wait until they were done so you could make your call. Party lines disappeared in the early 70s. Well, at least I’m young enough that I didn’t have to pick up the phone and ask an operator “to connect me”! This link looks at thing we no longer do due to changes in technology. It’s kind of fun to read these and realize how some things have changed.

10 Bizarre Things About British Homes

When I was in the Air Force, I spent about four years at Torrejon Air Base outside of Madrid. Living in a foreign country really opens your eyes about the ways people live. For instance, I was visiting some Spanish friends “on the economy” (at their house) and was telling about my mom’s house in Ohio. I told them how very old it was and how her great grandparents had built it during the American Civil War in the 1860s. They laughed a little and told me that the house I was in was 300 years old and the bench I was sitting on was nearly 500 years old! Suddenly you realize that everything from history or lifestyle are all from your experience and YOUR point of view. I came across a fun link that show some interesting differences with British homes that Americans probably wouldn’t understand.

And finally ...

Do you love multitracking? Into studio production music that is pulled apart? Here’s a great video which does iso (isolation) tracks of the Beatle’s “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.” It’s pretty amazing to hear the tracks isolated and realize just what goes into a great song!

If you stumble across a good or unusual website that might be of interest, please don’t hesitate to send me the link and any info you might have about it. My email address is dan_slentz@yahoo.com.

Author: Dan Slentz
Posted: May 24, 2018, 12:04 am
Two years of tumultuous negotiations has led the Radio Music License Committee to finally ask a federal judge to decide how much its member radio stations pay Broadcast Music Inc. in licensing fees. The move is likely tied to the expected passage of the Music Modernization Act later this year, ...

Timing of RMLC request interesting, observers say

Two years of tumultuous negotiations has led the Radio Music License Committee to finally ask a federal judge to decide how much its member radio stations pay Broadcast Music Inc. in licensing fees. The move is likely tied to the expected passage of the Music Modernization Act later this year, observers say.

The U.S. House voted unanimously for the MMA in April and the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee held hearings on its version of the MMA this month, according to those familiar with developments.

“One aspect of that bill is the requirement that rate court proceedings be randomly assigned to District Court Judges like any other case,” says Kevin Goldberg, a partner with Fletcher, Heald & Hildreth PLC, “as opposed to the current situation where BMI’s cases all end up before the same judge.”

Goldberg, who expects the judge to encourage both parties to continue their discussions seeking an agreement, says the RMLC request for a rate court proceeding is probably the last thing either side wants. “There is every reason to believe that they might still reach an agreement on a new rate at some point.”

[Read: House Passes Digital Music Licensing Package]

BMI for its part sounded less optimistic in its response to the RMLC’s move last week: “As anticipated, the RMLC is trying to use a below-market rate they negotiated with the only U.S. PRO [Performance Royalty Organization] they were able to come to an agreement with; an agreement based on flawed market share data and one that has since been made irrelevant by newly-agreed to and adjudicated rates in the marketplace. We look forward to presenting our position before the court and demonstrating the dominance of BMI’s repertoire.”

Mike Steinberg, executive vice president, licensing & creative for BMI, authored the response and was likely referring to the agreement RMLC reached with ASCAP in 2017, which was generally seen by those familiar with the agreement as generally favorable to radio broadcasters. In addition, an arbitrator last year awarded RMLC represented stations a more than 60% discount off the SESAC rate card through 2018.

Melodie Virtue, a principal with Garvey Schubert Barer in Washington, says the PROs, including ASCAP and Global Music Rights, appear to be pushing for the idea of randomly assigning judges, as the MMA would do. “I’m guessing RMLC would prefer it to be the same judge who historically hears these cases (making a decision).”

The RMLC, which represents some 10,000 commercial radio stations on music licensing matters, hopes to reduce the current BMI rate set at 1.7% of defined net revenue. An interim agreement at that rate has remained in place during negotiations, according to the RMLC.

Observers say that a new RMLC rate agreement with BMI agreement is expected to be retroactive to early 2017 and expire at the end of 2021.

The Music Modernization Act packages together several bills impacting how digital services license music from publishers, observers say, and collect royalty payments for artists. It does not create a performance royalty covering the terrestrial signals of radio broadcasters.

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Author: Randy J. Stine
Posted: May 23, 2018, 6:40 pm
The United Tower Alliance LLC has announced a national UAV tower inspection service, provided by the UTA and 18 of its regionally based Performance Partners. Coupled with a custom data delivery platform, the new service provides drone-powered tower surveys nationwide. A UTA Network Operations ...

Launch follows opening of company's network operations center in March

The United Tower Alliance LLC has announced a national UAV tower inspection service, provided by the UTA and 18 of its regionally based Performance Partners.

Coupled with a custom data delivery platform, the new service provides drone-powered tower surveys nationwide. A UTA Network Operations Center has been operational since March and the Performance Partners have been training operators at the 2018 UTA Flight Academy, adding practical knowledge and real-life flight experience to the Part 107 license.

“Performance Partners are stable firms whose employees are technical experts around towers,” according to Ean Mercer of the UTA. “Anyone can fly a drone, but our commercial operators are also experienced tower professionals who have the access, familiarity and equipment to solve problems. They are also equipped with software tailored for your infrastructure needs.” The UTA added that it “does not sanction amateur, subcontractor or non-tower related flights or activity.”

[Read: A New Tool for the Broadcast Engineer]

The Alliance has custom software that delivers secure actionable data to the end client and is scalable for any national asset owner. The solution provides for the collection, management, analysis and comparison of data that is the highest quality imagery, according to the UTA..

“We came up with a method that uses our strengths to capitalize on the safest and most efficient people in the business” according to Jason Lerew, operations manager of the UTA. “Our execution coupled with high end commercial UAVs and cloud based professional imagery leave everyone in the chain satisfied.”

All Performance Partner firms are NATE/STAR Participants whose employees have extensive local experience and have also undergone advanced flight training. These regional experts are available for scheduling UAV Tower Inspections at www.flyuta.com.

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Author: TV Technology Staff
Posted: May 23, 2018, 6:30 pm
This article has been modified to clarify that the subject is a series of petitions filed last year, not the petition filed this week. While the industry digests the 998 objections that Prometheus and two other advocacy groups filed with the FCC on May 17, the Federal Communications Commission has ...

Organization called the FCC’s earlier decision arbitrary, capricious and contrary to LCRA

This article has been modified to clarify that the subject is a series of petitions filed last year, not the petition filed this week.

While the industry digests the 998 objections that Prometheus and two other advocacy groups filed with the FCC on May 17, the Federal Communications Commission has issued a firm "no" in a separate Prometheus filing — one that may be of interest to low-power FM stations, AM operators, LCRA supporters, and those watching for a future tug of war between AM radio stations and LPFMers.

Last year the Prometheus Radio Project filed a series of petitions with the FCC saying the commission’s 2017 formal order on the siting of cross-service translators for AM stations was arbitrary, capricious, contrary to the goals of the Local Community Radio Act of 2010, and insensitive to the needs of community-oriented noncommercial educational LPFM providers.

The issue surrounds the commission’s decision not to adopt a specifically defined distance limit on the siting of cross-service translators for AM stations with a 2 mV/m contour exceeding 25 miles.

[Read: Prometheus Petitions FCC to Slow the AM Translator Train]

As part of its AM revitalization efforts, the FCC amended a rule in February 2017 surrounding the siting of an FM translator that is rebroadcasting an AM station. The draft of this Second Report and Order differed from earlier documents in that it did not include any specific distance limits on the siting of translators.

This was done intentionally, the FCC said, to give AM stations flexibility in using a cross-service translator to serve its core market — assuming that it still did not extend its signal beyond the station’s core service area.

Prior to the circulation of this Second R&O draft, the rules were quite specific: a cross-service FM translator had to be located such that its 60 dBμ contour was contained within the lesser of either the AM station’s daytime 2 mV/m contour, or within a 25-mile radius centered at the AM station’s transmitter site.

As the FCC put it: “refraining from adopting a limit would be consistent with the objective, articulated in the [AM Revitalization Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking], to provide flexibility to an AM station using a cross- service translator.”

Prometheus objected, however. It argued that without the proposed 40-mile limit, expanded siting options for cross-service FM translators would lead to an increase in the short-spacing of low-power FM stations from multiple directions, and would significantly restrict incumbent LPFM stations’ ability to relocate in the event of lost transmitter sites.

The commission dismissed Prometheus’ objections at the time and went ahead and approved the Second R&O without any mention of the 40-mile limit. The commission said Prometheus neglected to quantify the number of LPFM stations that would be affected and noted that the new rules still made space for mandated minimum spacing and contour overlap protections.

Prometheus responded again with a stay petition and reconsideration petition and demanded a freeze on the processing of related applications.

[Read: Prometheus Explains Its Translator Argument]

The FCC again disagreed. “Despite Prometheus’s claims, the commission did not fail to account for any adverse impact that the order will have on LPFM stations,” the FCC said. “Rather, the commission found that the public interest benefits of providing greater flexibility for AM stations to locate cross-service translators, even beyond the 40-mile limit, were significant and that nothing in the record, including Prometheus’s February Ex Parte, demonstrated harm to LPFM stations that would outweigh these benefits.”

Nor does the commission agree with Prometheus’ assessment that it violated the LCRA by not adopting a set distance limit on siting of cross-service translators.

“[The order] addresses community needs by allowing improved primary service by AM broadcasters” such that the requirements of Section 5 of the LCRA have been met, the FCC said.

The commission rejected Prometheus in another way: its assessment that the FCC favored expansion of commercial stations, “many of which are controlled by large national ownership groups at the expense of noncommercial local LPFM,” Prometheus told the FCC.

Elimination of the set distance limit does not favor expansion of commercial stations at the expense of noncommercial stations, the FCC said. “The increased flexibility in siting of cross-service translators will benefit both commercial and noncommercial AM stations … [and] the potential for harm to noncommercial LPFM stations resulting from this increased flexibility is remote.”

As a result, the commission rejected Prometheus’s request for reconsideration and dismissed its stay petition as moot.

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Author: Susan Ashworth
Posted: May 23, 2018, 6:08 pm
image caption: Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS) graduate Scott Taylor, who will be participating in the school’s June 2 Open House and June 1 Grad Panel Forum at CRAS’ Gilbert, Ariz. campus. Gilbert, Ariz., May 23, 2018 - The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS; ...

image caption: Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS) graduate Scott Taylor, who will be participating in the school’s June 2 Open House and June 1 Grad Panel Forum at CRAS’ Gilbert, Ariz. campus.

Gilbert, Ariz., May 23, 2018 - The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS; www.cras.edu), the premier institution for audio engineering education, will be opening the doors to its Gilbert, Ariz. campus (1205 N. Fiesta Blvd.) to prospective students, parents, and the media on Saturday, June 2 from 10am – 4pm. Three CRAS graduates will be on hand for the Open House, and they will also be part of an Open Panel Forum held for current CRAS students the evening of June 1.

“There are a host of opportunities for our students once they graduate, and we want to give them an idea of what’s out there first hand for them once they enter the open market,” said Kirt Hamm, CRAS administrator. “Besides our mandatory internship program, getting our students in touch with our graduates who either are working for others, or who have made the leap into self employment, is huge. That’s what this grad panel is about in our upcoming Open House. Continued education, networking, and learning what it takes for going out on one’s own by those who have done it already is of enormous value for any student.”

Hamm continued, “We also want prospective students and their parents to discover everything there is to know about a CRAS education, and with hard work and dedication just how successful they can be. For instance, every year, CRAS graduates populate, in great numbers, Grammy nominations for the year. Most recently, seven of our graduates worked on multiple 2018 Grammy Award-winning nominations by numerous artists. In total, 28 CRAS graduates worked on 26 Grammy-nominated albums and songs across 28 categories this past year.”

Members of the June Open House Grad Panel include:

· Micheal Peterson - engineer based out of L.A. He has held many positions including house engineer, head assistant engineer, light technician and has assisted in most management areas. He’s worked with Wiz Khalifa, Snoop, Miguel, Avenged Sevenfold, The Cult, Anthrax, Winery Dogs, Twenty One Pilots and the full Glee cast.

· Scott Taylor - stage manager and audio technician currently for Chris Issak; worked tours with Young The Giant (FOH engineer); Bush (systems engineer / FOH technician); Pat Benatar (FOH technician); Cher Lloyd (monitor engineer); Big Bad Voodoo Daddy (monitor engineer); My Darkest Days (drum/audio consultant); No Doubt (monitor engineer); Poison (monitor technician); Linkin Park (PA technician); Jimmy Buffett (PA technician / monitor technician); Prophets of Rage (monitor technician).

· Jordan McClain - foley cuer/editor/mixer at Sinc Sound in downtown L.A. Most recent work includes S.W.A.T., Atlanta, and Westworld.

At the June Open House, guests will be able to interact with CRAS faculty and get a taste of the curriculum and the state-or-the-art audio gear spread throughout its numerous classrooms as well as its 42-foot Mobile Broadcast Unit. They will also be able to participate in live demonstrations in many of these real world audio recording studios, live sound venue, and labs.

The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences is composed of two nearby campuses in Gilbert and Tempe, Ariz. A CRAS education includes Broadcast Audio, Live Sound, Audio Post for Film and TV, Music Production, Commercial Production and Video Game Audio, all taught by award-winning instructors who have excelled in their individual fields. CRAS’ structured programs, and highly qualified teaching staff, provide a professional and supportive atmosphere, which is complemented by its small class sizes allowing for individual instruction and assistance for students in engineering audio recordings. CRAS has been providing quality vocational training in Audio Recording for more than three decades. The curriculum and equipment are constantly being updated to keep pace with the rapid advancements in the music and sound recording industries. CRAS’ course offerings and subject matter have always centered around the skills and knowledge necessary for students’ success in the Audio Recording industries.

The 11-month program is designed to allow every student access to learn and train in all of the Conservatory’s studios which are comprised with state-of-the-art audio recording and mixing gear, the same equipment used in today’s finest studios and remote broadcast facilities, including Pro Tools 12, API Legacy consoles, SSL G+ and AWS consoles, Studer Vista consoles, and much more. All students must complete a 280-hour industry internship to graduate from the Master Recording Program II that may ultimately lead to industry employment.

“We want everyone to see, hear, and feel how our 11-month program focuses exclusively on what a student needs to know to begin living their passion in any one of the many facets of the Recording Arts,” Hamm concluded.

For more information on the Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences, please visit www.cras.edu, contact Kirt Hamm, administrator, at 1-800-562-6383, or email to info@cras.edu.

About The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences

Based in the heart of The Valley of the Sun with two campuses in Gilbert and Tempe, Ariz., The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS) is one of the country’s premier institutions for audio education. The Conservatory has developed a unique and highly effective way to help the future audio professional launch their careers in the recording industry and other related professional audio categories.

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Author: CRL Public Relations
Posted: May 23, 2018, 5:52 pm
Emergency alerting officials in Minnesota will get a half-hour shot at simultaneously testing their local emergency alert and wireless alert systems this June. The Department of Public Safety within the State of Minnesota requested authority from the Federal Communications Commission so that EAS ...

Overall goal of the June 18 test is to ensure that the WEA and EAS systems will work during an emergency

Emergency alerting officials in Minnesota will get a half-hour shot at simultaneously testing their local emergency alert and wireless alert systems this June.

The Department of Public Safety within the State of Minnesota requested authority from the Federal Communications Commission so that EAS participants and commercial mobile service providers could conduct a combined live Emergency Alert System and end-to-end Wireless Emergency Alert test on Wednesday, June 18 from 6:30 to 7 pm Central time.

An EAS test will be sent out using the Civil Danger Warning event code in Stevens County, Minn., with participation from eight surrounding counties. At the same time, a related test of WEA will be sent only to the city of Morris, Minn.

According to the state’s Emergency Communication Networks department, recent events in Hawaii demonstrate that it is essential that the public be familiar with WEA and EAS and that emergency managers be proficient both with the operation of the systems and with the decision-making processes that may need to be made before initiation of an actual alert.

[Read: FCC Sets New WEA Guidelines]

The department told the FCC that the test would allow the state to build on its existing training and create a template and best practice plan for future testing of WEA and EAS. The overall goal of the test is to ensure that the WEA and EAS systems will work during an emergency, the group said.

The proposed WEA test message will read “This is a test of Stevens County Wireless Emergency Alerts. No action is required,” while the EAS test message will say “This is a test of the Stevens County Emergency Alert System. If there had been an actual emergency, further instructions would have followed, this is only a test. No action is required.”

Ensuring that the public is aware that this is only a test is a priority, the state agency told the FCC. The state agency said it set up a pretest outreach and coordination plan to ensure public understanding that the event is a test. The plan will be shared with public information officers in all affected areas, to first responder organizations, and distributed to traditional and social media outlets.

The state agency also said it would provide the FCC with a detailed account of any issues that occur in the distribution of the WEA and EAS tests.

The commission agreed to provide a waiver for conducting such a test in part because this instance will simultaneous involve testing of both the EAS and WEA. FCC rules otherwise prohibit unauthorized use of the WEA and EAS systems.

“We believe that a coordinated and combined test of the two systems is a likely reflection of what would occur in an actual emergency, i.e., that both WEA and the EAS would be used,” the FCC said in granting the waiver.

The FCC also noted the benefit in completing such a test of the WEA now as opposed to after May 2019, a move that may help ensure that WEA and the EAS can be effectively deployed in a coordinated manner during an emergency.

At its Jan. 30 Open Meeting, the FCC set a deadline of May 1, 2019, for wireless providers to support Spanish-language messages in WEA and extend the length of alert messages from 90 to 360 characters. A second deadline, for establishing an enhanced geotargeting and keeping messages available on mobile devices for 24 hours, is set for Nov. 30, 2019. Both were made in an effort to promote the wider use and effectiveness of WEA, particularly for state and local authorities to convey critical messages to their communities.

A similar waiver was granted earlier this year to In the Vail Public Safety Communications Center in Colorado to allow wireless providers to participate in a WEA test on May 2, 2018.

Comments are still being accepted in the FCC ECFS database for those wishing to weigh in on the feasibility of including multimedia content in WEA messages. Those comments can be submitted by May 29 in the FCC ECFS database using Docket 15-91. Reply comments will be due by June 11.

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Author: Susan Ashworth
Posted: May 23, 2018, 5:16 pm
In September 2017, Category 5 Hurricane Irma devastated the U.S. Virgin Island of St. Thomas along with much of the rest of the Caribbean. Among the victims was WTJX(FM). The hurricane knocked the station — which rebroadcasts NPR national content — right off the air and destroyed the facilities of ...

Pubcast FM/TV combo continues a messy and expensive recovery process

In September 2017, Category 5 Hurricane Irma devastated the U.S. Virgin Island of St. Thomas along with much of the rest of the Caribbean. Among the victims was WTJX(FM).

The hurricane knocked the station — which rebroadcasts NPR national content — right off the air and destroyed the facilities of sister PBS TV station WTJX.

“As well, Hurricane Irma knocked down our STL (studio-to-transmitter microwave link) at the St. Thomas transmitter site on Mountain Top,” said Robert Dickinson, WTJX’s director of engineering. In March, more than six months later, it was not yet restored.

DEVASTATING STORM

Before Irma hit, the stations broadcast from Mountain Top, one of the highest points on St. Thomas. Their shared facility included a transmitter building and a 250-foot antenna tower, used by both stations and third-party clients, and a 100-foot auxiliary/STL tower. The site was backed up by a 190 kW main generator and a small 8 kW unit used with the station’s mobile production unit.

The STL was connected to the TV station’s offices/studios on the southwest on 158-158A Haypiece Hill. The FM had offices there and used the TV’s studio to record promos.

Hurricane Irma devastated this facility, gutting the TV production studio down to its massive steel support girders and even damaging some of them. Add wind and rain damage to the rest of the facility, and “our St. Thomas office/ TV studio was destroyed,” said Tanya-Marie Singh, WTJX’s chief executive officer.

In March, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, center, and members of the commission’s Hurricane Task Force met with station CEO Tanya-Marie Singh and toured the damage caused by Irma. This image is from the FCC’s Twitter feed.

Up on Mountain Top, “Hurricane Irma knocked down our 100-foot tower, and severely damaged the 4.5 meter Ku-band satellite dish we used to downlink NPR via satellite,” said Dickinson. To make matters worse, the main generator developed issues that couldn’t be fixed without parts coming from the U.S. mainland, which wasn’t going to happen soon. As well, the station’s 8.1 meter dish that provided the downlink for PBS TV programming was seriously damaged.

On St. Croix to the south, WTJX(FM)’s offices had survived because Irma skirted the island. But although the station had purchased equipment for a production studio, it was not ready to go to air. Besides, “With the STL down on Mountain Top, there was no way for us to link this studio to the transmitter,” Dickinson said. “And with telephone, power and internet down all over St. Thomas, there was no way to create a backup path to the transmitter.”

MAKING DO

Determined to get the FM station back on air as soon as they could, Dickinson and his staff made adjustments to an old 3.8 meter dish so that it could receive the NPR satellite feed on C-band. Given that this antenna was an abandoned Ku-band dish, this was no small accomplishment.

Add the lack of adequate landline and generator power, and it took nearly two weeks to get WTJX back on air with national NPR programming.

When Radio World spoke to WTJX in late March, station staff reported that the St. Croix radio studio had yet to be activated. “We are still without an STL connection between Mountain Top and St. Croix,” Dickinson said. “Meanwhile, using an internet connection hasn’t been an option until recently, due to the island’s internet being down.”

As a result, WTJX listeners were still unable to get local content on the U.S. Virgin Islands’ NPR station. But still, having access to a national NPR feed was a welcome relief for many.

MAKING PROGRESS

Faced with a difficult post-Irma recovery, WTJX did what it could to get local content out by other means.

As of February, “The station has managed to put out regular airings of its ‘Full Circle’ public affairs program via Livestream (on the web) … and rebroadcast the legislature’s LegiTV streaming coverage of both the State of the Territory and the legislature’s response,” according to an article in the U.S. Virgin Islands Daily News.

As for replacing the St. Thomas production facility, Singh estimates that it would cost $15 million to $20 million to build a new office/studio tough enough to weather the next Category 5 hurricane.

“I’m looking at trying to get the power up at our facility, power, water, fiber underground,” she told the Daily News. “I’m hoping to make this station completely resilient. That’s what we’re hoping we can do.”

An image from the FCC Twitter feed in March shows TV station equipment.

Dickinson, in his interview with Radio World, expressed gratitude to NPR and PBS for coming to St. Thomas and helping out.

“NPR sent down a crew and supplies to replace the 4.5 meter dish, which we are now using on again to downlink NPR network programming,” he said. Meanwhile as of late March the TV station was back on air, though the 8.1 meter dish was damaged “and is limping along,” Singh said. “We are working with PBS and General Dynamics to get it fully restored.”

Looking ahead, WTJX’s priority is to create some sort of temporary production facility on St. Thomas close to Mountain Top, so that it can produce programming related to the 2018 elections. In particular, Singh wants local candidates to be able to make their cases over the air to voters. “Everyone needs a chance to be heard,” she said.

As for the long term? Raising millions for a new facility in St. Thomas is going to be a daunting task for the stations. To help out, NPR “Fresh Air” host Terry Gross recorded some fundraising PSAs, and the company advertised for a new director of development and fundraising to get things going. Singh herself is hoping that a combination of FEMA funds and public donations will be sufficient to put WTJX back on its feet.

“Relatively speaking, we’re in okay shape, but we have a massive amount of work ahead of us,” said Singh.

Author: James Careless
Posted: May 23, 2018, 5:07 pm
How to develop the next generation of engineers is a question constantly on the minds of U.S. radio industry executives. This issue of Radio World features three articles on various aspects of that question including a progress report on the SBE's new mentoring program. Also in this issue are the ...

Read about the future of broadcast engineering about what the industry is doing to develop the next generation of professionals

How to develop the next generation of engineers is a question constantly on the minds of U.S. radio industry executives. This issue of Radio World features three articles on various aspects of that question including a progress report on the SBE's new mentoring program. Also in this issue are the stories featured below.

ST. THOMAS

Months After Hurricane, WTJX Fights On

In September 2017, Category 5 Hurricane Irma devastated the U.S. Virgin Island of St. Thomas along with much of the rest of the Caribbean. Among the victims was WTJX(FM). The hurricane knocked the station — which rebroadcasts NPR national content — right off the air and destroyed the facilities of sister PBS TV station WTJX. Learn about their efforts to rebuild and serve their community.

TRENDS IN TECHNOLOGY 

Remote Monitor and Control Systems in a NOC Environment

Not that long ago, having a “network” of transmitter sites to maintain meant having a long list of telephone numbers you would use to reach specific remote controls. Today, you likely have a list of IP addresses. Doug Irwin explores what’s behind this evolution in technology and how it affect workflows.

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE:

Author: RW Staff
Posted: May 23, 2018, 3:01 pm
All-New Extension and Switching Solution for VR/AR Signals At InfoComm 2018, IHSE will demonstrate an all-new, game-changing solution to extend and switch immersive reality signals over long distances using Draco KVM systems. The new solution addresses growing interest in virtual and augmented ...

All-New Extension and Switching Solution for VR/AR Signals

At InfoComm 2018, IHSE will demonstrate an all-new, game-changing solution to extend and switch immersive reality signals over long distances using Draco KVM systems. The new solution addresses growing interest in virtual and augmented reality (VR/AR) systems in a wide variety of pro AV market sectors; in corporate and education applications such as product design and prototyping; in situational training and advanced control environments; and in retail and leisure applications including cinemas, shops, and museums.

Extending the distance between source computers and users, and switching between VR/AR applications, are real challenges today. IHSE’s Draco KVM solutions allow high-performance computers for VR/AR systems, CAVEs, and large LED walls to be located at a remote distance of up to 80 kilometers via a fiber connection. This approach eliminates the need to locate expensive PC hardware equipment close to users or to purchase multiple high-performance computers. Redundancy options for mission-critical systems are also available.

Photo Link: www.wallstcom.com/IHSE/IHSE-USA_VR-Center.jpg

Photo Caption: IHSE Extension/Switching Solution for AR/VR

Draco vario Remote IP-CPU Extender

IHSE will showcase its new Draco vario Remote IP-CPU extender module, an expansion of the company’s successful Draco vario series. This first-of-its-kind virtual KVM solution enables the integration of virtual servers into existing Draco tera KVM physical switch systems, creating a streamlined multitasking virtual environment where multiple operating systems and applications can be accessed directly from the physical consoles of the Draco KVM system.

The IP-CPU extender module is particularly suited to control rooms with virtualized process automation, network operations centers that require real-time access to real and virtual target devices, and TV and film industry environments that rely increasingly on virtualized desktops. Users can access virtual machines directly from their own KVM-connected workstations via RDP (remote desktop protocol) or perform simple PC maintenance remotely. The extensive functionality of the Draco KVM system offers options such as real-time switching; sharing; private mode; and flexible, unrestricted access to all connected computers and virtual machines. For example, companies that have different departmental or branch-office applications written for different operating systems can consolidate them under one virtual server and access them all directly from the physical KVM console.

Photo Link: www.wallstcom.com/IHSE/IHSE_IP-CPU.jpg

Photo Caption: IHSE Draco vario Remote IP-CPU Extender

Draco ultra — 495 Series

Built on IHSE’s proven Draco ultra series extender platform and utilizing the company’s Lici® technology, the new Draco 495 series extenders for HDMI 2.0 provides full-4K video distribution for UHD 2160p, 30-bit 4:4:4 signals. The Draco ultra 495 transmitter/receiver set extends 4K (4096x2160 or 3840x2160) video and USB HID peripherals from the host system up to 10 kilometers over single-mode fiber. Additionally they can be integrated as part of the Draco ultra series KVM switch fabric to share connections between HDMI 2.0 or DisplayPort devices. The 495’s visually lossless technology delivers exceptional graphics and video playback performance with the computer centrally located in a machine room via a single duplex LC-LC fiber-optic cable. These extenders also support audio transmission via the HDMI interface. Also available are optional Draco vario add-on modules for digital audio input and output as well as data signals such as USB 2.0 and RS232. For a direct video access in the server room, the CPU (TX) includes a local output to connect a control monitor. At the same time, there is a local input on the CON unit (RX) to connect a locally connected source (switchable). For mission-critical and 24/7 operations such as broadcast, 3D design, visualization, and military command-and-control environments, the units can be installed in chassis assemblies for redundant power and redundant path distribution.

Photo Link: www.wallstcom.com/IHSE/IHSE-USA_ultra_HDMI2.jpg

Photo Caption: IHSE Draco ultra 495 Series

Visit IHSE USA at InfoComm 2018 in booth N1428.

About IHSE USA

IHSE USA is a leading provider of KVM (keyboard, video, and mouse) products supporting long-distance signal extenders and switching for DVI, HDMI, VGA, SDI, USB, audio, and RS-232 serial data. For 30 years, IHSE has been developing new and innovative ways of supporting next-generation products for KVM and signal extenders. IHSE technology is deployed worldwide by public and private organizations in industries such as broadcasting, postproduction, government and military, medical, financial, and oil and petroleum. The company offers a complete line of DVI and HDMI video extenders over Cat-X or fiber-optic cables for mission-critical video and data access.

Link to Word Doc: www.wallstcom.com/IHSE/180523IHSE.docx

Follow IHSE USA:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/IHSEUSMarketing

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/IHSE-USA-LLC/451555998278049?ref=stream

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeZlti-IfdBCBToP5il6MGw

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/ihse-usa-llc

Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: May 23, 2018, 2:10 pm
Slovenia’s Broadcasting Council, Svet za radiodifuzijo-SRDF, is eyeing Feb. 2, 2022 as the date for the country’s digital radio switchover. According to the minutes of a meeting held late last year, the Broadcasting Council said it would “advocate for the date of transition from the FM ...

Country’s broadcasting council sets preliminary DSO date for 2022

Slovenia’s Broadcasting Council, Svet za radiodifuzijo-SRDF, is eyeing Feb. 2, 2022 as the date for the country’s digital radio switchover.

According to the minutes of a meeting held late last year, the Broadcasting Council said it would “advocate for the date of transition from the FM network to DAB+ as soon as possible.” The Council proposes the 2022 date, which it said, coincides with the timing of other proposed transitions within the framework of the updated legislation.

SRDF is responsible for broadcasting regulation in Slovenia.

Slovenia initially tested DAB+ in 2013 in the capital city of Ljubljana and officially launched digital radio in 2016. Today the country has 12 DAB+ services on-air covering more than 70 percent of the population. 

[Read: Digital Listening Reaches 50.9 Percent in UK]

The network is powered by seven medium-power transmitters, covering urban areas and highways.

Slovenia launched digital radio in 2016.

Agencija za komunikacijska omrežja in storitve Republike Slovenije-AKOS, the nation's Agency for Communication Networks and Services of the Republic of Slovenia, issued licenses for 13 DAB+ stations, which include four stations from public broadcaster RTV and nine other stations. 

Author: Marguerite Clark
Posted: May 23, 2018, 12:00 pm
UDEN, Netherlands — Netherlands-based Thimeo Audio Technology is putting focus on its Thimeo Stereo Tool audio processor and Thimeo WatchCat file-based processing utility. The company says its Stereo Tool can be used for almost anything — the software can process FM, AM and all digital formats, ...

The software can process FM, AM and all digital formats

UDEN, Netherlands Netherlands-based Thimeo Audio Technology is putting focus on its Thimeo Stereo Tool audio processor and Thimeo WatchCat file-based processing utility.

The company says its Stereo Tool can be used for almost anything the software can process FM, AM and all digital formats, both live and file-based, and can run as a plug-in in many playout programs. Stereo Tool can generate any type of sound, adds Thimeo, from open and dynamic to dense and squashed, without causing distortion or listener fatigue.

The Thimeo Stereo Tool.

When used for FM, Stereo Tool, which includes a stereo and RDS encoder, is designed to generate a signal that’s “extremely loud, dynamic and clean,” while simultaneously improving reception in fringe and multipath areas, the company says. In addition to its audio processing functions, the company says its Stereo Tool can also repair potential issues, such as digital clipping, lossy compressor artifacts and disturbing tones. For low bitrate streams, the cleaned-up audio reduces low bitrate artifacts, allowing for improved sound at the same bitrate, or the same quality at a lower bitrate.

Thimeo Audio Technology also offers Thimeo WatchCat, a file-based processing utility. WatchCat is able to convert, process and normalize files to RMS, LKFS, or peak level.

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Thimeo WatchCat can “watch” folders and process anything that’s placed in them automatically, or files can be dropped onto it. Custom scripting is available to perform actions for all files, and for example to process video files.

Free trial versions of Thimeo Stereo Tool and Thimeo WatchCat are available at www.stereotool.com.

For information, contact Thimeo Audio Technology in the Netherlands at mail@thimeo.com or visit www.stereotool.com.

Author: Marguerite Clark
Posted: May 23, 2018, 9:51 am
The University of Northwestern-St. Paul has bucked recent trends with the announcement of a planned acquisition of Omaha station KGBI(FM). Pending approval by the Federal Communications Commission, the university will purchase the station from Salem Media Group, which has programmed the station ...

Salem Media plans to pass station to another Christian noncom operator

The University of Northwestern-St. Paul has bucked recent trends with the announcement of a planned acquisition of Omaha station KGBI(FM).

Pending approval by the Federal Communications Commission, the university will purchase the station from Salem Media Group, which has programmed the station with a Christian contemporary music format.

And it seems likely to retain that format, based on a statement from the University of Northwestern Senior Vice President for Media Jason Sharp.

“We look forward to expanding our network in Omaha and continuing the work of pointing people to Jesus through music and programming that makes an eternal impact,” Sharp said in the announcement.

[Read about other station sales trends here.]

The deal is expected to close in the third quarter of this year, and the purchase terms were not disclosed in the announcement. Patrick Communications’ Greg Guy served as the broker representing the University of Northwestern-St. Paul.

In addition to its latest planned acquisition, the University of Northwestern-St. Paul operates 20 non-commercial Christian contemporary stations, including stations in Minneapolis and Duluth, Minn.; Sioux Falls, S.D.; Fargo and Bismarck, N.D.; Des Moines and Waterloo, Iowa; Madison; Kansas City, Mo.; and Hartford, Conn.

Author: Emily M. Reigart
Posted: May 22, 2018, 7:43 pm
Brooklyn, NY - Pro Sound Effects®, the next level sound effects library company, has released Gators – a one-of-a-kind sound library featuring stunning alligator sound effects from bellowing mating calls to monstrous growls, aggressive hisses, and vicious jaw snaps. There is a reason you will not ...

Brooklyn, NY - Pro Sound Effects®, the next level sound effects library company, has released Gators – a one-of-a-kind sound library featuring stunning alligator sound effects from bellowing mating calls to monstrous growls, aggressive hisses, and vicious jaw snaps.

There is a reason you will not find another sound library dedicated to alligator or crocodile recordings anywhere else. These sounds can not only be dangerous to record, but they are extremely difficult to capture as alligators are typically very stealthy, quiet creatures. That’s why recordist Colin Hart and his team embarked on several excursions to the swamps of Florida over many years to develop a method for cueing their unique sounds.

“When I first began recording these alligator sounds, I unknowingly set out on a journey that would take seven years to complete,” says recordist Colin Hart. “The result is an impressively large alligator library with unreal recordings that still captivate me every time I hear them.”

Delivered in 24-bit/192kHz and 24-bit/96kHz, each sound file in Gators is embedded with descriptive metadata for lightning fast search. Use Gators as your secret weapon for creature sound design to give life to monsters, dragons, and dinosaurs – as well as to add character to explosions, thunder, fire, engines and more.

Gators Key Features:

  • 75 sounds (520MB)
  • 24-bit/192kHz and 24-bit/96kHz broadcast .wav files
  • Descriptive embedded metadata
  • 100% Royalty-Free
  • Download or flash drive delivery (+$40)
  • Free Sampler available for download (2 sounds, 4.5MB)

View Gators Full Features & Download Free Sampler

Pricing & Availability

The Gators sound effects library is available now at $149 for a one-user lifetime license. A free sampler including two WAV files selected from the library is available for immediate download at prosoundeffects.com/gators.

2+ users? Contact licensing@prosoundeffects.com.

Author: Music Marcom
Posted: May 22, 2018, 7:00 pm
Biamp Will Lead Design, CTS Certification, Audio Over IP, Video Compression, Microphone Technology, and Room Solutions Sessions BEAVERTON, Oregon — May 22, 2018 — Biamp Systems, a leading provider of innovative, networked media systems, has announced a robust lineup of educational and speaking ...

Biamp Will Lead Design, CTS Certification, Audio Over IP, Video Compression, Microphone Technology, and Room Solutions Sessions

BEAVERTON, OregonMay 22, 2018 — Biamp Systems, a leading provider of innovative, networked media systems, has announced a robust lineup of educational and speaking sessions at InfoComm 2018, June 6-8 at the Las Vegas Convention Center. As part of InfoComm’s three-day educational offering, Biamp's L. William Nattress III — CTS-D, CTS-I, director of consultant relations — will lead “CTS-D Prep” while Jake Corlett — CTS-D, CTS-I, InfoComm adjunct faculty instructor and Biamp regional manager — will co-lead “AV Design Level 1: Environment,” both offered June 2-4, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

In addition, Biamp will present several seminars to guide attendees through the latest innovations, trends, and hurdles related to audio over IP, video compression, microphone technology, and room standardization. InfoComm 2018 sessions include:

AVB/TSN: Ethernet and IP for Audio, Video and Beyond
Wednesday, June 6, 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Biamp’s Geordie Klueber (field sales engineer), presenting on behalf of the Avnu Alliance, will join Richard Bugg of Meyer Sound (digital products solutions architect) to address the primary challenges of real-time audio and video on standard networks, how different technologies and protocols can address each challenge, and the equipment and tools to show real-world application. Attendees can earn 1.5 RU toward their CTS, CTS-D, or CTS-I certification.

Microphone Arrays, Beamforming & Voice Tracking Technologies
Wednesday, June 6, 1 – 2 p.m.
Led by Biamp’s Zach Snook (audio products manager) and Rob Houston (UC product manager), this audio seminar will help AV professionals understand the principles of the technology behind microphone arrays and beamforming, comprehend the capabilities beamforming and voice tracking offer and how they differ from conventional microphones, and cover a typical implementation process. Attendees can earn 1 RU toward their CTS, CTS-D, or CTS-I certification.

Success in Standardized Room Solutions
Thursday, June 7, 8 – 10 a.m.
In this technology management seminar, Nattress will help attendees understand standardized room solutions by planning a long-term, sustainable technology strategy to build and evolve classroom and meeting room spaces. Attendees can earn 2 RU toward their CTS, CTS-D, or CTS-I certification.

The Ins & Outs of Video Compression Algorithms
Thursday, June 7, 2:30 – 3:30 p.m.
This talk, led by Biamp’s Video Product Manager Chris Fitzsimmons and Dobil Laboratories’ Tom Mclaughlin, director of technical operations, aims to examine the need for compression, its underlying technologies, explain the available options, and provide guidance on when best to apply each. Attendees can earn 1 RU toward their CTS, CTS-D, or CTS-I certification.

Additional information about the InfoComm 2018 education sessions is available at www.infocommshow.org.

More information on Biamp’s full product portfolio is available at www.biamp.com.

Visit Biamp at InfoComm 2018, Booth C1954

# # #

About Biamp Systems
Biamp Systems, LLC is a leading provider of innovative, networked media systems that power the world’s most sophisticated audio/video installations. The company is recognized worldwide for delivering high-quality products and backing each one with a commitment to exceptional customer service.

Biamp is dedicated to creating products that drive the evolution of communication through sight and sound. The award-winning Biamp product suite includes: Tesira® media system for digital audio and video networking, Devio® collaboration tool for modern workplaces, Audia® digital audio platform, Nexia® digital signal processors, and Vocia® networked public address and voice evacuation system. Each has its own specific feature set that can be customized and integrated in a wide range of applications, including corporate boardrooms, conference centers, huddle rooms, performing arts venues, courtrooms, hospitals, transportation hubs, campuses, and multi-building facilities.

Founded in 1976, Biamp is headquartered in Beaverton, Oregon, USA, with additional engineering operations in Brisbane, Australia, and Rochester, New York. For more information on Biamp, please visit www.biamp.com.

PR Link: www.ingearpr.com/Biamp/180522Biamp.docx

Follow Biamp Systems:
Blog: blog.biamp.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/BiampSystems
LinkedIn: linkd.in/1aO2hjy
Twitter: twitter.com/Biamp
YouTube: bit.ly/BiampYouTube

All trademarks and registered trademarks mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners.

Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: May 22, 2018, 5:52 pm
WMMR(FM) morning show personalities Preston and Steve have reached the two-decade mark working in Philadelphia radio together, and this year, WMMR is also celebrating 50 years on the air (now owned by Beasley Media Group). Additionally, Preston and Steve been nominated nominees in the Active ...

Read a Q&A with the morning show personalities, who are celebrating the milestone this month

WMMR(FM) morning show personalities Preston and Steve have reached the two-decade mark working in Philadelphia radio together, and this year, WMMR is also celebrating 50 years on the air (now owned by Beasley Media Group). Additionally, Preston and Steve been nominated nominees in the Active Local/Regional (10 years or more) category for the 2018 class of the National Radio Hall of Fame.

To help mark the occasion, Radio World asked Preston about what it’s like to work with Steve at WMMR and how his job has evolved since the late ’90s.

The whole show crew, taken at an event in 2017. Preston is third from right, and Steve is standing to his right.

View the 5 images of this gallery on the original article

Radio World: What's your favorite part of working as a morning show host? Favorite segment?

Preston and Steve: It’s fun. We get to laugh at work every single day. No matter what kind of mood I am in, I know that at least for a few hours a day I am going to enjoy myself.

My favorite segments are when we go off the rails on something unplanned and just nail it! Unfortunately, you never know when things like that are going to happen — but when they do and you’re in the middle of it, it’s pretty exhilarating.

RW: How has your show evolved over the past 20 years?

P&S: We’ve gotten more long form as the years have gone by, and we’re not quite as stunt-heavy as we used to be. You can get just as much entertainment out of the right conversation as you can with an over the top gonzo street bit.

RW: Has technology changed the way you approach your job? If yes, how?

P&S: In some regards, yes, it has. We can use social and text to get some immediate feedback, as well as more opportunity for larger contesting. But for the most part, we try to focus on what comes out of that speaker.

[Read about Preston and Steve's ventures into the world of video for radio.]

RW: What's unique about Philadelphia radio and Philly listeners?

P&S:They don’t take any shit. If you’re not being “you,” they can call you out on it. That’s why I think we’re a perfect fit for this city. We don’t put on any affectations. We don’t do any canned bits or taped interviews. It’s all live and real, and I think the city knows it and appreciates it.

RW: What has been a more significant development for you/your station — online radio streams or podcasts?

P&S: Podcasts, for sure. We jumped on it before most people had any idea what it was all about. At first management was pretty iffy on it, but we saw it as an opportunity to grab people who couldn’t listen to us during morning drive for whatever reason. 

We encouraged fans of the show to share or podcasts with friends who either didn’t care for us or weren’t familiar with us. It ended up paying off big time. We had people get on board left and right after giving us a shot when it was convenient for them to listen. Most ended up finding a way to tune in to the actual broadcast, which, of course, helps the numbers.

Author: Emily M. Reigart
Posted: May 22, 2018, 4:56 pm
Dr. Byron St. Clair, president emeritus of the National Translator Association, died May 20 in Denver of brain cancer. He was 93. St. Clair, who served as president of the National Translator Association for 19 years, is known as the "father of translators, LPTV and low-power FM," the association ...

President emeritus of National Translator Association was the “father of translators, LPTV and low-power FM”

Dr. Byron St. Clair, president emeritus of the National Translator Association, died May 20 in Denver of brain cancer. He was 93.

St. Clair, who served as president of the National Translator Association for 19 years, is known as the "father of translators, LPTV and low-power FM," the association said.

He worked to serve those living in the mountainous rural western United States with broadcast service and in so doing created a new class of over-the-air broadcasting, which has grown to more than 4,000 stations that serve millions of people.

“Byron was a friend and mentor to all, a man of immense intellect, wisdom, ethics, kindness and vision,” said NTA President John Terrill.

During his career, St. Clair was director of R&D for Adler Electronics and founded and served as president of EMCEE, a manufacturer and installer of TV translators. In 1967, he founded and was president of Television Technology Corp. in Arvada, Colo., which later became Larcan-TTC.

St. Clair obtained a BSEE in 1945 and a master’s degree in physics in 1949 from Columbia University. He earned a Ph.D in physics in 1953 from Syracuse University.

He was a member of the National High Definition Television Subcommittees, Systems Subcommittee Working Party to Field Test Task Force, a board member of the Advanced Television Broadcast Alliance, a member and active participant in the Association of Federal Communications Consulting Engineers. St. Clair also was a member of the board of directors for Denver public broadcaster KBDI(TV).

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering recognized St. Clair in 2017 with its Jules Cohen award for lifetime achievement.

The NTA is establishing The Byron W. St. Clair Memorial Scholarship Fund in partnership with the Association of Federal Communications Consulting Engineers for promising undergraduate and graduate students with an interest in a career in broadcast engineering at accredited U.S. universities and colleges.

St. Clair is survived by his wife of 71 years, Julie, and daughter Susan Hansen of Arvada, Colo. A memorial service will be held in June. Details were not immediately available.

Author: Phil Kurz
Posted: May 22, 2018, 4:51 pm
— Save valuable time and money with advance registration options before time runs out — New York, NY — Due to popular demand, and in honor of AES Membership Month, the AES has extended online advance registration options to end of day, Monday, 21 May (midnight, Milan time, CEST) for the upcoming ...

— Save valuable time and money with advance registration options before time runs out —

New York, NY — Due to popular demand, and in honor of AES Membership Month, the AES has extended online advance registration options to end of day, Monday, 21 May (midnight, Milan time, CEST) for the upcoming AES Milan Convention, set to take place 23–26 May in Milan, Italy. The final call for advance registration marks the last possible day to receive significant discounts of up to 50% for AES Members. Complimentary Exhibits-Plus passes are also available using code AES144NOW at checkout.

Prospective attendees can register now at aeseurope.com for the 144 Audio Engineering Society International Convention online and begin planning their AES Milan Convention experience. Four-day All Access passes are designed to offer the most comprehensive convention package, with admission to all on-site events, including the exhibition floor and all workshop, tutorial, and research presentations. The Exhibits-Plus badge – a complimentary offering for all that pre-register with the VIP code AES144NOW – gains access to the exhibition floor and core special events, the Professional Sound Expo, and more. As always, AES Members receive exclusive discounts, with even deeper discounts and incentives for Student Members studying for careers and opportunities in audio engineering and related fields. Members of all classifications also have access to online preprints of paper sessions in advance of AES Conventions, along with their E-Library and AES Live Videos benefits.

With this year’s theme, “The Power of Sound,” the 144 International AES Convention in Milan will bring together audio professionals, students, enthusiasts and advanced audio technologies from around the world for four days of audio immersion, experiences and networking like no other. Be part of this year’s largest European AES event and register now at aeseurope.com before the 21 May deadline.

Author: PR Staff
Posted: May 22, 2018, 2:39 pm
The International Association of Audio Information Services has announced the winners of its annual Program Awards for quality audio production. The awards are intended to promote quality, as well as provide examples of the types of programming available for “who cannot see, hold or comprehend the ...

Awards are intended to promote quality, as well as provide examples of the types of programming available

The International Association of Audio Information Services has announced the winners of its annual Program Awards for quality audio production.

The awards are intended to promote quality, as well as provide examples of the types of programming available for “who cannot see, hold or comprehend the printed word and who may be unable to access information due to a disability or health condition,” according to its website.

The winners and honorable mentions are:

Newspapers: Radio Reading Service of Greater Cincinnati for the New York Times Arts and Leisure Section. Tracy Schoster is the reader, the audio engineer is Charles Van Sant and Mark DeWitt serves as producer.

Honorable mention to VoiceCORPS of Columbus, Ohio, for live reading of the Columbus Dispatch, read by Fred Alverson and Lisa Maggard and produced by Chuck Adkins.

Consumer Information: Audio-Reader Network of Lawrence, Kan., for Mail Order Catalogs. Talent is Mary Ann Saunders and audio engineer Nick Carswell,.

Magazines: Radio Reading Service of Greater Cincinnati for The Science World, read by Mary Kay Delgado and produced by Charles Van Sant.

Honorable mention to Sun Sounds of Arizona – Flagstaff for Teen Beat, which was read and produced by Bethany Williams.

Magazine Digest: MindsEye Radio, Belleville, Ill., for “The African American Hour,” featuring Kristi Carson as the reader and Mike Curtis as audio engineer.

Honorable mention to Georgia Radio Reading Service of Atlanta for “Go Green,” read by Jennifer Nittoso, produced by Kevin Brunup.

Narrative Reading: Sun Sounds of Arizona – Tempe for “Animal Companions” read and produced by Joyce Vesper.

Honorable mention to VoiceCORPS, Columbus, Ohio, for “A Good Book” narrated by Karen Elson and produced by Chuck Adkins.

Honorable mention also to Sight Into Sound, Houston for “News of the World,” read and produced by Jim Abate, audio engineer Jim Martinez.

Dramas and Dramatic Reading: Sight Into Sound, Houston for the Christmas special “Mistletoe Mysteries” read by Pearl Hewitt and Jim Abate, produced by Jim Martinez.

Thematic Production: Sight Into Sound, Houston for “Rodeo Houston Promo” featuring KC Jobe and produced by Jim Martinez.

Honorable mention to Audio-Reader Network of Lawrence, Kan., for “He-AR Promo.” Talent are Kimberly Morrow and Dan Skinner, and the producer is Nick Carswell.

Interview and/or Call-In: WXXI Reachout Radio, Rochester, N.Y., for “Eyes on Success: Low Vision Optometry” created and produced by Peter and Nancy Torpey.

Honorable mention to “Ear to Ear” from MindsEye Radio of Belleville, Ill. Jason Frazier was talent, and the producer was Mike Curtis.

Non-Reading Entertainment: Audio-Reader Network, Lawrence, Kan., for “Christmastime in History.” Written and read by Carl Graves, produced by Nick Carswell.

Honorable mention to Sight Into Sound, Houston, for “Houston’s Team, Houston’s Title.”

On Location: Valley Eye Radio, Springfield Mass., for “Community Affairs — Dr. Seuss” produced by Harold Anderson with Karen Fisk.

This year’s honorees will be recognized in June at the IAAIS Annual Conference in Boulder, Colo.

Author: Emily M. Reigart
Posted: May 22, 2018, 2:15 pm
— Revamped Refer-a-Friend program now benefits both the new member and the referring member; AES NY 2018 housing opens early for members only; best pricing availability on All Access and Exhibits-Plus badges, including substantial member discounts, extended for the largest European AES event of the ...

— Revamped Refer-a-Friend program now benefits both the new member and the referring member; AES NY 2018 housing opens early for members only; best pricing availability on All Access and Exhibits-Plus badges, including substantial member discounts, extended for the largest European AES event of the year —

New York, NY — The month of May is Membership Month for the Audio Engineering Society, with early opening of housing availability for AES New York 2018; AES Milan 2018 Advance Registration with its deep discounts for members extended; and a revamp of the Society’s Refer-a-Friend program.

Everyone wins with the new AES Refer-a-Friend program – the referring member and the new or lapsed renewing member each receive independent Discount Credits of 10% of the membership fee. Accumulated Discount Credits can be used toward anything that can be purchased at aes.org, including AES products, services, event registration, and Membership dues. Details are available at aes.org/membership/referrals.

From May 1 through May 15, 2018, before AES NY 2018 Advance Registration opens on May 16, members also have exclusive access to housing registration for AES New York 2018, slated for the Jacob Javits Center, October 17–19 for the exhibition and October 17–20 for the technical program. This benefit allows members the opportunity to secure the best available rooms and pricing. The housing registration link is linked from the Member Discount page: secure.aes.org/members/discounts.

Register now for the 144 Audio Engineering Society International Convention, set to take place May 23–26 in Milan, Italy, as we celebrate the 70 anniversary of the AES, and take advantage of best pricing on Advance Registration, extended through May 14 in honor of AES Membership Month. Whether planning to take in all that the AES Milan Convention has to offer with a four-day All Access pass, or registering for an Exhibits-Plus badge in order to visit the exhibition floor and attend core special events, act now to save valuable time and money while at the show, and start planning your convention experience. As always, AES Members receive exclusive discounts of up to 50% on the two annual AES Conventions (the discount is the equivalent of the membership dues for All Access registration) and Conferences around the world, throughout the year, as well as a host of other benefits. Even deeper discounts and incentives for students offer additional advantages to those studying for careers and opportunities in audio engineering and related fields and provide invaluable networking opportunities with professionals and peers from around the world.

Whether you’ve been to an AES International Convention before, or are making AES Milan your first major event, you will find a wealth of useful information online at aeseurope.com, including an interactive calendar, Technical Program listings, exhibitor and presenter information, news and events, and everything you need to get the most out of your experience. Make your attendance at AES Milan a top priority in your professional audio career and education, and come be a part of history as we take on the next advancements in Game Audio & AR/VR, Immersive Audio, Recording & Production, Sound Reinforcement, Product Development, Signal Processing, Networked Audio, and more. Current AES Members, as well as those looking to join, will have the opportunity to renew or register their membership onsite and to begin taking advantage of benefits, including pre-prints of AES Milan research papers and proceedings downloads, and more.

Author: PR Staff
Posted: May 22, 2018, 1:07 pm
This article has been updated to utilize additional information. What does the recent low-power FM filing — the one that objected to nearly 1,000 applications by full-power stations seeing extend their coverage with repeater stations — mean for low-power stations and those whose application has ...

Industry reactions are swift and decisive over LPFM advocacy groups’ claim that FCC allowed spectrum grab

This article has been updated to utilize additional information.

What does the recent low-power FM filing — the one that objected to nearly 1,000 applications by full-power stations seeing extend their coverage with repeater stations — mean for low-power stations and those whose application has been flagged as objectionable?

It depends on who you ask, although reactions to the filing have been swift and decisive.

On May 16, three organizations, Center for International Media Action, Common Frequency and the Prometheus Radio Project, filed objections to 998 applications by full-power stations that are seeking to extend their coverage with repeater stations. According to the groups, the Federal Communications Commission has not upheld its duty to be serve as a referee between the interests of stations looking to extend coverage with repeaters and new LPFMs looking to get a start in broadcasting.

[Read: LPFM Advocates File Objections to Nearly 1,000 Applications]

The groups said the FCC has informally sanctioned the practice of allowing translators to short-space existing LPFM facilities — to allow translator proposals to be spaced shorter than what LPFM services are allowed to do — without legally testing the issue.

“This, by definition, affords a higher status to translators,” the groups said in their filing. The groups said this is in direct violation of the 2011 Local Community Radio Act (LCRA), which was designed to ensure that urban areas had opportunities for both LPFM and translator applications, the groups said in their filing.

Reactions to the filing have been sharp.

“I have a hard time believing that the FCC overlooked the LCRA in all four AM revitalization FM translator windows,” said one engineer. “It is very likely that what occurred took place after careful consideration of the requirements of the LCRA, and that will all come out at some point.”

In the meantime, however, this engineer thinks it likely that the Prometheus filing will “throw a monkey wrench into the works.”

“[This will] cause a suspension of processing of all as-yet ungranted Window 3 and 4 translator applications, which will do considerable harm to AM radio stations and the industry as a whole,” he said.

One advocacy group called the move “well intended [but] poorly executed.”

REC Networks said it agrees with many of the positions raised by Prometheus, Common Frequency and the Center for International Media Action in its information objection filed with the FCC. “Prometheus et al does raise some interesting issues that require consideration,” said REC founder Michelle Bradley, including the notion that licensing decisions should be based on the needs of the local community, and that translators, boosters and LPFM must remain equal in status.

REC and Prometheus et al are also close in agreement on underlying issues, she said, including the fact that the LCRA is still in effect and that in implementing the 2017 and 2018 cross-service windows, the LCRA may have been violated.

“Where we have a serious conflict with Prometheus et al was the execution of the nearly one thousand informal objections that were filed against applications, including those that were not even accepted for filing,” she said.

Community Radio is more than just noncommercial stations; there are many mom and pop operators in rural areas with tiny contours that serve their communities with local news, sports and personalities, Bradley said.

“These are not iHeart or Cumulus. These are stations that have been in the family for generations and with the increase in electronic devices, switching power supplies and increased interference from Cuba and IBOC, these stations are in serious trouble, even during the daytime.

“What gives Prometheus et al the right to hold the livelihood of these stations hostage to promote a valid agenda using a very improper method?” she said. “Instead of filing against the translator proposals that would cause these LPFM short spacing, they decided to arbitrarily file against any translator application with a pulse.

“Prometheus et al, please do the right thing and gracefully withdraw this [informal objection].”

Others see an outright abuse of the system.

“The LPFM mass filing of informal objections against pending FM translator applications is an abuse of FCC processes,” said John Garziglia, a partner with Womble Bond Dickinson in Washington — in part because LPFM proponents are well aware that it is FCC staff policy not to process an application that has an unresolved objection pending against it.

The LPFM argument, however, is not with the FM translator applications, he said.

“It is rather with the FCC’s underlying settled rules and policies. They know that the FM translator applications will be held hostage to the LPFM proponents’ issues if the FCC accords the mass Informal Objections cognizance, he said.

Though LPFM proponents claim that LPFMs and FM translators are not being treated equally — that not enough spectrum is being made available for LPFMs — this ignores that two LPFM filing windows opened long before the filing of the now-pending AM revitalization FM translator applications, Garziglia said.

Others see the filing in a different light.

“While we support their goal to protect equal access to spectrum by LPFM as well as translators, CCB [Christian Community Broadcasters] opposes the coalition’s ‘broad swath,’ which indiscriminately opposed all translator applications,” said John O. Broomall, Sr. with CCB, Canton, Ga., which was not part of the coalition that prepared the objections.

“Many broadcasters do not realize that LPFMs can own two translators and thus LPFM advocates are not ‘anti-translator,’ he added. “Translator windows in recent years have been for AM broadcasters only, thus LPFM operators who want to expand their coverage would need to purchase translator CPs or licenses, which are now prohibitively expensive."

However, he said, “LPFM advocates and operators know that low-power FM is secondary to full-power FM.”

LPFM is supposed to be co-equal to translators yet translators have power and coverage advantages, Broomall said, pointing to situations where some translators are rated at 250 watts while LPFMs are limited to 100 watts — with power as low as 1 watt if their antenna is atop a mountain or otherwise high above average terrain. Also, with rare exceptions, low-power broadcasters must use omnidirectional patterns while translators can use virtually any directional pattern to squeeze into tiny spectrum holes, Broomall said.

What’s next? It’s possible the FCC may move to deny the objections, Garziglia said, by ruling that they fail to state a legal or factual basis for a denial of any of the referenced FM translator applications.

“If the LPFM informal objections are quickly denied, then FCC’s Audio Division may continue its superb job of expeditiously acting on pending FM translator applications,” he said. “AM stations who are in full compliance with existing FCC rules — pursuing FM translators as lifelines — should not suffer because LPFM proponents think there should be fewer commercial radio stations and more LPFM stations.

“Hopefully, the FCC chairman will take rapid steps to summarily dismiss the mass informal objections against the hundreds of currently pending FM translator applications,” he said.

Added the industry radio engineer: “The clock is ticking on a lot of struggling AM stations, and providing them with an FM signal in their local area would in many cases be the shot in the arm that would keep them viable,” he said.

“That rescue may well be in jeopardy now. How can that be in the public interest?”

Common Frequency, the Prometheus Radio Project and the Center for International Media are calling for all applicants listed in the filing to confirm that their engineering requests meet the demands of the LCRA or be subject to dismissal or rescindment. The applicants are listed in in Appendix A of the groups’ filing, and include applicants from all over the contiguous United States as well as Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico.

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Author: Susan Ashworth
Posted: May 21, 2018, 9:32 pm
The author is president emeritus and senior advisor for the Multicultural Media, Telecom and Internet Council. Radio World welcomes opinion and points of view on important radio broadcast industry issues. When I read the press clips and commentary about radio pirates, I want to jump up and down, ...

Recent proposals don’t address the real source of the problem

The author is president emeritus and senior advisor for the Multicultural Media, Telecom and Internet Council. Radio World welcomes opinion and points of view on important radio broadcast industry issues.

When I read the press clips and commentary about radio pirates, I want to jump up and down, wave my arms, and scream, “How can everyone be missing the most important fact about them?”

And I don’t care if I look crazy putting it in all caps, but the part most people miss is: “ALMOST ALL PIRATES CHOOSE EXCLUSIVELY TO SET UP ILLEGAL, UNLICENSED STATIONS TO TARGET AND EXPLOIT LARGE MARKET AFRICAN AMERICAN AND LATINO NEIGHBORHOODS.”

Just what “services” do pirates provide to these neighborhoods?

They play the “club” version of records — the versions with the four- and 12-letter words that are banned by the FCC on licensed radio stations, but are easily accessible to young children on pirate stations; and

And they provide an audio stream free of bad news, bad weather, or bad emergencies — because they don’t broadcast news, weather or EAS alerts.

As a result, individuals often listen to their local “underground” stations, as they’re sometimes referred to, with no awareness of how they hurt their own communities.

[Read: Pirate Radio Bill Formally Introduced]

And at whose expense are these “services” delivered? Primarily minority broadcasters, who built their companies through years of hard work — providing genuine value, supporting their communities, and playing by the rules. Pirates say “let me steal a piece of this.”

At MMTC, we’ve encountered a pirate or three. We’ve learned how they think. They are neither crazy nor stupid. What they are are opportunists. Old fashioned capitalists, but not in a good way. And smart ones.

They know, to a moral certainty, that if they set up shop in Beverly Hills, they’d be cuffed or shackled before they laid down four of George Carlin’s “Seven Dirty Words.” They’d be thrown under the jail.

A bunch of years ago, I met a pirate who was trying to “get legal” by transitioning into LPFM. He had accumulated a little sum of money “serving” Black communities in Harlem and Brooklyn, with no FCC license. Chatting with him, my ears perked up, because (1) he didn’t know a lot of black people; (2) he hadn’t grown up in those neighborhoods; and (3) except for who Michael Jackson was, he knew virtually nothing about black music.

But it turned out that he understood black social injustice quite well. I found this out when I asked him, “Why’d you choose black neighborhoods to broadcast from?”

And this dude flat out told me: “David, they’re the safest place for a ‘Part 15 broadcaster.’ [That’s what some pirates call themselves, I kid you not. Real Part 15 broadcasters keep to their effective service range of about 61 meters. So I call BS, but digress.] And why is it so safe for us Part 15 guys? Because the government doesn’t care about black and Spanish neighborhoods. They don’t do housing code enforcement there. They don’t fill up the potholes there. They’re in no hurry to answer 911 calls there. They don’t provide equal schools there, or even safe schools. So, do you really think the government is going to enforce the Communications Act there?”

Excellent point!

It goes to the reason we call a pirate a “pirate.”

Seaborne pirates carefully choose targets of opportunity such as container ships with small staffs in poorly-patrolled waters, such as those off the Somali coast. Broadcast pirates, emulating their seaborne cousins half a world away, carefully choose, as targets of opportunity, the neighborhoods they think the FCC doesn’t care about.

Now, let’s talk about what you’re reading this commentary to find out: How can the FCC shut down, punish, and disincentivize a pirate?

Let’s start with ginormous forfeitures. They won’t work. Think about it: pirates generally aren’t “Trump-scale” rich. Mostly, they have little to lose, so they aren’t going to be motivated by an unfathomably large forfeiture that can never be collected. They have no way to pay a $75,000 fine, so why would they be even more frightened by having to pay a $750,000 fine?

What about confiscating electronic gear? Really good idea, because it’s unique. It takes days to replace and assemble tubes, diodes, and cart machines into an unlawful radio operation. Confiscating gear strikes at the common strategy of pirates — get shut down at 101 Oak Street on Monday, then light up a transmitter at 102 Spruce Street on Tuesday.

What about going after landlords? Well-intended, but a bad idea. It’s unfair as well as detrimental to the low-income housing marketplace. A landlord doesn’t have any notice that the tenant is operating a one-room radio station on premises — any more than the landlord would know if the tenant is maintaining a one-room meth lab. Turning pirate enforcement over to landlords — and punishing the landlords if they overlook a pirate – would require landlords to pay someone to inspect the premises every few days – thus raising housing costs, decreasing housing quality, or both.

Similarly, small, local advertisers can’t be expected to know that a pirate’s operation violates the Communications Act. If you’re reading this in Radio World, you’re already too close to the subject matter. We radio geeks sometimes forget that maybe 90% of the public has never heard of the Communications Act (and most of the other 10% couldn’t care less). On the other hand, a large national advertiser that buys spots on a pirate station should know better and ought to be sanctioned.

For its part, Congress needs to do two things to hit pirates hard:

First, it needs to restore cuts to the FCC’s budget that brought about the closure of critical field offices. Three years ago, the FCC operated 24 field offices; today, it operates only 13. It needs 30!

Second, the FCC needs to be given the authority to take pirates to court on its own, rather than depend on the Department of Justice to bring lawsuits on the FCC’s behalf. Pirates rank very low among the DOJ’s litigation priorities. It never made sense for an agency with the top-level expertise of the FCC’s Office of General Counsel to have to depend on the DOJ to do its enforcement litigation.

Finally, there’s one thing the FCC can do right now: Chairman Pai, or any of the commissioners, should appear at one of the national multicultural civil rights organizations’ conventions and give a speech that says approximately as follows:

“Radio World just published a commentary that says that pirates think the government doesn’t enforce the law in multicultural neighborhoods — making those neighborhoods a safe haven for radio piracy. That’s not going to be true on my watch,” and then lay out exactly what the commission is going to do to run down, capture, and prosecute pirates with equal zeal no matter whose neighborhood pirates choose to exploit.

If you have additional thoughts, criticisms, ideas, and prayers on how to take down pirates, please send them along — dhonig@mmtconline.org. Let’s make 2018 “The year radio pirates slithered under a rock and stayed there.”

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Author: David Honig
Posted: May 21, 2018, 9:14 pm
Jacob Media’s annual Techsurvey provides a detailed snapshot of media consumption, and offers some useful insights into trends in usage, as well as what to expect next. A big chunk of the report is a breakdown of media consumption, as shown by the Brand Pyramid. It helps broadcasters gain better ...

Brand pyramid shows good news for AM/FM and streaming video

Jacob Media’s annual Techsurvey provides a detailed snapshot of media consumption, and offers some useful insights into trends in usage, as well as what to expect next. A big chunk of the report is a breakdown of media consumption, as shown by the Brand Pyramid. It helps broadcasters gain better insights into the consumption habits of their listeners, identifying the key media brands that they use.

Leading the pack is AM/FM radio, says the Techsurvey, with 92%. Facebook comes in second, with 74%, and remains the dominant social media platform. Both Instagram and Snapchat are way behind Facebook, but show significant growth.

There’s good news as well for the streaming video brands. Jacobs says 52% of its respondents now use Netflix on a weekly basis, up sharply from 41% last year. Amazon Prime Video and Hulu also show upticks in consumption of 24% and 19% respectively.

[Read: Jacobs Says Digital Listening’s Impact Increases]

The news for streaming audio brands is not so good. Techsurvey found that 25% listen to Pandora on a weekly basis. That’s about the same as last year, following a drop in weekly usage over the previous two years. iHeartRadio remained stagnant at 18% year to year, while Spotify inched up 1% from 12% to 13% this year.

Both the Techsurvey’s Media and Brand pyramids may be further broken down by format, gender and generation, making them useful in further understanding how listeners are changing their habits.

A free webinar — “10 Key Takeaways From Techsurvey 2018” — is scheduled for Thursday, May 24th at 2 p.m. ET.

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Author: Tom Vernon
Posted: May 21, 2018, 6:07 pm
Even as the Federal Communications Commission and Department of Justice prepped to take significant action against alleged pirate operators in Manhattan, it had its eye on other operations in New York, New Jersey and Oregon. In early April, agents from the New York Office of the Enforcement Bureau ...

Agents operate on both coasts

Even as the Federal Communications Commission and Department of Justice prepped to take significant action against alleged pirate operators in Manhattan, it had its eye on other operations in New York, New Jersey and Oregon.

In early April, agents from the New York Office of the Enforcement Bureau investigated an unlicensed FM station operating on the frequency 107.7 MHz in the Orange, N.J., area. Using direction-finding techniques, radio signals were detected on the frequency 107.7 MHz from a property on 439 Main Street and found that the alleged station was being operated by Nicolas Ronald at a property owned by Sanjiv Jain of Orange.

Around the same time, agents from the Boston Office investigated a complaint of an alleged unlicensed FM station operating on the frequency 99.7 MHz in Brockton, Mass. Agents delivered a notice of unlicensed operation to Cayemite J. Edner of Brockton as the owner of the property on North Warren Ave. where the station was allegedly operating.

The month prior, agents sent a notice of unlicensed operation to John G. Pierre of Brooklyn after agents responded to complaints of an unlicensed FM station operating on the frequency 93.7 MHz. Agents confirmed by direction-finding techniques that radio signals on frequency 93.7 MHz were allegedly emanating from 1710 Carroll Street, and that Pierre was the operator of the station.

[Read: Feds Confiscate Gear From Alleged NYC Radio Pirate]

About 2,600 miles across the country in La Grande, Ore., agents from the Portland office of the Enforcement Bureau used direction-finding techniques to assess that radio signals on frequency 92.3 MHz were allegedly emanating from an antenna located in Room 8 at the Orchard Motel occupied by Thomas Eugene Barnes.

In each case, agents allegedly discovered that the stations were operating at a strength that exceeded the maximum permitted level of 100 microvolts per meter (μV/m) at 3 meters for nonlicensed devices.

Each were warned that operating radio transmitting equipment without a valid radio station authorization is a violation of Federal law, and that an operator may be subject to monetary fines and criminal sanctions. Each individual has 10 days to respond with evidence they have FCC authority to operate.

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Author: Susan Ashworth
Posted: May 21, 2018, 3:59 pm
IHeartMedia made several West Coast personnel announcements. Seattle’s KUBE(FM) has announced Zann will join the station as its afternoon drive on-air host, and Zach “Mayhem” Wellsandt will join the station as assistant PD and music director in addition to having new midday host responsibilities. ...

New personnel on the West Coast

IHeartMedia made several West Coast personnel announcements. Seattle’s KUBE(FM) has announced Zann will join the station as its afternoon drive on-air host, and Zach “Mayhem” Wellsandt will join the station as assistant PD and music director in addition to having new midday host responsibilities. Additionally, Greg Neft has been named PD for KALZ(FM) and KRZR(AM) in Fresno, Calif.

Zann will broadcast weekdays from 3–7 p.m. She joins KUBE from Dallas, where she most recently served as the midday host at Cumulus Media’s KLIF(FM). She has also served as an afternoon drive host in New York. She began her career as a morning show producer in Philadelphia.

Wellsandt joins iHeartMedia Seattle from iHeartMedia’s Central Texas region, where he most recently served as the director of CHR. His background includes PD roles in Austin, Texas; Grand Rapids, Mich.; and Spokane, Wash., where he began his career.

iHeartMedia Seattle owns and operates KBKS(FM/HD2), KUBE(FM/HD2), KJR(AM/FM/HD2), KZOK(FM/HD2), KJAQ(FM/HD2/HD3), KFNQ(AM) and KHHO(AM).

As PD in Fresno, Greg Neft will be responsible for programming operations for KALZ and KRZR. He will report to iHeartMedia Fresno Senior Vice President of Programming Steve Weed.

Neft joins the market from St. George, Utah, where he most recently served as the corporate director of news content programming for Cherry Creek Media. He returns to Fresno after previously working there as an anchor and reporter. He also served as the morning news anchor for WOKV and an NFL reporter for Sirius XM Radio in Jacksonville, Fla.

iHeartMedia Fresno owns and operates KALZ, KBOS(FM), KCBL(AM), KRZR, KFBT(FM), KFSO(FM), KHGE(FM), KRDU(AM), and KSOF(FM).

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Author: Emily M. Reigart
Posted: May 21, 2018, 3:48 pm
Event on 29 May in Munich Will Be First of Two SMPTE Plugfests in 2018 Demonstrating Utility of IMF for Movie and Broadcast Content Exchange LONDON and WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — 21 May 2018 — SMPTE®, the organisation whose standards work has supported a century of advances in entertainment technology ...

Event on 29 May in Munich Will Be First of Two SMPTE Plugfests in 2018 Demonstrating Utility of IMF for Movie and Broadcast Content Exchange

LONDON and WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. 21 May 2018 SMPTE®, the organisation whose standards work has supported a century of advances in entertainment technology and whose membership spans the globe, is collaborating with the Institut für Rundfunktechnik (IRT) to conduct a face-to-face Interoperable Master Format (IMF) plugfest that tests the ability of vendors to create and play interoperable IMF packages. IRT is the research institute of the public broadcasters of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland.

View the 2 images of this gallery on the original article

Scheduled for 29 May at the IRT in Munich, the event will be held as a meeting of the SMPTE Media Packaging and Interchange Technology Committee (TC-35PM) Plugfest Drafting Group. A second face-to-face IMF plugfest, also organised by SMPTE, will take place 18-19 October in the Los Angeles area. To facilitate broad industry participation, SMPTE has scheduled the event before the SMPTE 2018 Annual Technical Conference & Exhibition (SMPTE 2018), which will be held 22-25 October at the Westin Bonaventure in downtown Los Angeles.

While SMPTE has organised several IMF plugfests in recent years, and various industry groups have organised their own IMF plugfests, this event will be the first collaborative IMF plugfest. The SMPTE-IRT plugfest also will be significant in that it will bring together a wide variety of international content providers, distributors, broadcasters, and vendors.

“As a robust standard for the interchange of movie and broadcast content, IMF is being taken seriously by broadcasters, content providers, and distributors as a format for file-based distribution and exchange,” said SMPTE Director of Standards Development Thomas Bause Mason. “While IMF has clearly demonstrated its value as a format for the mastering and distribution of content between business entities, further testing is critical to the format’s broad adoption by the broadcast community and to its future success as an industry standard. The participation of the IRT — and the consortium of broadcasters behind the institute — indicates the global industry’s embrace of IMF as a flexible yet stable framework for the interchange of file-based content, and we’re pleased to be working with the institute to move IMF forward.”

First standardised by SMPTE in 2013, IMF provides the media and entertainment industry with one interchangeable master format with a defined structure for the distribution of content between businesses around the world. Based on the SMPTE MXF standards suite, the format specifies how video, audio, and data essence — plus dynamic metadata — can be wrapped in MXF and synchronised using an XML-based composition playlist (CPL) to create a media program, such as a movie or a television episode, in multiple versions and languages. In turn, the IMF can be fed into a transcoder to create a wide variety of deliverables. In April of this year, the UK-based Digital Production Partnership (DPP) proposed an IMF profile as part of its delivery specification for broadcast and online.

During the SMPTE-IRT plugfest, IMF packages will be created by multiple vendors’ devices using agreed-upon test vectors and supplied source material spanning several IMF applications. A package created by one specific device will be tested by all other participating devices to verify whether or not the packages can be processed correctly and produce the same results. In the process, issues will be noted and solutions proposed that can be used to inform IMF users, as well as clarify or update the existing SMPTE standards.

Ahead of the SMPTE-IRT plugfest, a “virtual plugfest” will be conducted to allow vendors the opportunity to work with the source material ahead of time in their labs. More than 16 organisations have registered to participate in the face-to-face plugfest in Munich. SMPTE-IRT Plugfest results will be anonymised before being shared with SMPTE TC-35PM members. Individual results of a participant may be provided to IRT members at the sole discretion of each participant.

Brian Vessa of Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE) is the SMPTE IMF Plugfest committee chair, with David Deelo, also of SPE, as co-chair. During the Munich event, SMPTE Standards Vice President Bruce Devlin, TC-35PM Chair Pierre Lemieux, and other SMPTE subject matter experts will discuss the nature of IMF and the format’s relevance to industry workflows and business models.

“Both the IRT and SMPTE have worked to grow IMF as a format and to sponsor plugfests that both inform document updates and empower industry users to build equipment that can create, play, and transcode IMF,” said IRT Project Engineer Rico Zimmermann. “Together, we are continuing the important tradition of format testing and refinement. With the SMPTE-IRT plugfest in Munich later this month, we’re providing European broadcasters with a convenient opportunity to take part in this vital process.”

Registration for the event is required at www.irt.de/register-imf-plugfest-2018. Participation requires SMPTE membership and standards participation; more information is available at smpte.org/join.

Further information about SMPTE and its standards work is available at smpte.org. Additional details about IRT are available at irt.de.

# # #

About IRT

IRT is a neutral research and competence centre for audiovisual technologies. It explores, observes and develops new technologies with the aim to strategically adapt broadcasting to new market environments and needs. Around 100 employees do research on the premise in Munich in close cooperation with partners and clients for innovative solutions in the research areas of new AV formats, cross-media technologies, metadata, cloud production, all IP/IT, smart data, security, multi-platform, 5G, IP distribution, frequencies and regulation.

Its shareholders are the public broadcasters ARD, ZDF, Deutschlandradio, ORF and SRG / SSR. In addition, IRT collaborates with numerous clients in the sectors of broadcasting, media and industry. Its cooperation with international research partners offer access to global trends and developments. In its work with universities, IRT supports the training of junior staff, who actively involved in the research projects. With more than 60 years of experience, IRT is a pioneer of audiovisual media technology in a modern society.

www.irt.de

About SMPTE®

For more than a century, the people of the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers, or SMPTE® (pronounced “simp-tee”), have sorted out the details of many significant advances in media and entertainment technology, from the introduction of “talkies” and colour television to HD and UHD (4K, 8K) TV. Since its founding in 1916, SMPTE has received an Oscar® and multiple Emmy® Awards for its work in advancing moving-imagery engineering across the industry. SMPTE has developed thousands of standards, recommended practices, and engineering guidelines, more than 800 of which are currently in force today. SMPTE Time Code™ and the ubiquitous SMPTE Colour Bars™ are just two examples of SMPTE’s notable work. Now in its second century, SMPTE is shaping the next generation of standards and providing education for the industry to ensure interoperability as the industry evolves further into IT- and IP-based workflows.

SMPTE is a global professional association of technologists and creatives who drive the quality and evolution of motion imaging. Its membership today includes more than 7,000 members: motion-imaging executives, creatives, technologists, researchers, and students who volunteer their time and expertise to SMPTE’s standards development and educational initiatives. A partnership with the Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) connects SMPTE and its membership with the businesses and individuals who support the creation and finishing of media content. Information on joining SMPTE is available at smpte.org/join.

All trademarks appearing herein are the properties of their respective owners.

Link to Word Doc: www.wallstcom.com/SMPTE/180521SMPTE.docx

Photo: www.wallstcom.com/SMPTE/SMPTE_Rico-Zimmermann.jpeg

Caption: Rico Zimmermann, IRT Project Engineer

Photo: www.wallstcom.com/SMPTE/SMPTE_Thomas-Bause-Mason.jpg

Caption: Thomas Bause Mason, SMPTE Director of Standards Development

Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: May 21, 2018, 2:27 pm
The number of cars with line-fit DRM digital radio enabled radio sets in India is reaching 1 million, says Digital Radio Mondiale. The country’s public broadcaster All India Radio is rolling out DRM digital radio nationwide and now has 39 DRM transmitters installed and operational. Today AIR covers ...

The number of equipped cars nearing 1 million, says organization

The number of cars with line-fit DRM digital radio enabled radio sets in India is reaching 1 million, says Digital Radio Mondiale.

The country’s public broadcaster All India Radio is rolling out DRM digital radio nationwide and now has 39 DRM transmitters installed and operational. Today AIR covers a large part of the subcontinent and an estimated 600 million people with digital DRM radio services.

Credit: Digital Radio Mondiale

Digital radio is driven by listening in cars and is paramount for the success of India’s digital rollout program, the organization explained. It added that the receiver industry is already on board and has invested millions of dollars in the development of DRM digital radio capable receivers and the rollout of DRM equipped cars is “growing quickly by the month.”

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In 2017, this number was estimated to be about 500,000 cars, DRM says, while as of the beginning of May 2018 the volume has passed 800,000.

Author: Marguerite Clark
Posted: May 21, 2018, 9:57 am
PYEONGCHANG, South Korea — As they usually do, sports fans across the globe turned to television (and TV content streamed on the web) to follow the 2018 Pyeongchang 2018 Olympic Winter Games. After all, sports are best suited to be seen, as well as heard. Yet radio played its part in covering the ...

Although TV coverage dominated in PyeongChang, radio broadcasters produced medal-quality coverage too

PYEONGCHANG, South Korea — As they usually do, sports fans across the globe turned to television (and TV content streamed on the web) to follow the 2018 Pyeongchang 2018 Olympic Winter Games. After all, sports are best suited to be seen, as well as heard.

Yet radio played its part in covering the 2018 Olympic Winter Games, as proven by the studio facilities assigned to radio in the International Broadcast Center. Managed by Olympic Broadcasting Services, the IBC was located in the Alpensia resort where many of the Olympic sports competitions (such as ski jumping) were staged.

“OBS offered radio operations a working space at the IBC to receive all-natural sound in stereo from all sports, with a mix especially done for radio that doesn’t follow any camera view or sound effect that could distract the listener,” said Jorge Pickering, OBS’ Broadcaster Services director. This mix was made available to on-site rights holding radio broadcasters (RHBs) in both analog and digital formats.

 CBC Radio’s Andrew Parker reporting live at the Pyeongchang Olympic bobsled track. Credit: CBC Radio   

View the 8 images of this gallery on the original article

Within the IBC, Olympic radio broadcasters could book studios, working spaces, and technical rooms to store all their processing equipment. They also had access to an audio server that stored all interviews conducted by OBS Olympic Channel News in the mixed zones (an area where interviewers could ask questions of the athletes en masse).

As well, “we offered a number of radio facilities for broadcasters across all competition and non-competition venues, including 47 radio mixed zone positions and 57 radio commentary positions,” said Pickering. “RHBs (in all media) are also given the opportunity to have a commentary position at the venues to do narration directly where the action is taking place as well as access to a mixed zone to interview an athlete as soon as they are finished with their performance.”

CBC RADIO’S DYNAMIC DUO

Compared to the massive production crews deployed by the world’s television RHBs, the crews fielded by radio RHBs in Pyeongchang were barebones operations. For instance, the Canadian Broadcasting Corp.’s CBC Radio covered the Pyeongchang Games with just two people: Producer Andrew Parker and reporter Jamie Strashin.

Working together, CBC Radio’s “dynamic duo” produced “Live” hits (direct to air live commentary), packaged reports and “Raw” audio (athlete interviews) for “Olympic Regional Radio Updates,” and local CBC Radio shows nationwide. Parker and Strashin also filed many reports to the CBC Radio News flagship morning program, “World Report” and the hourly newscast “World This Hour.”

“Our priorities were focused on providing as much ‘Live’ coverage as possible to our hourly Olympic Updates, being produced/put to air by two crews in Toronto,” said Parker. Since he and Strashin had to provide content for morning and afternoon radio shows across Canada’s five time zones, “there was a massive amount of CBC Radio real estate, regional and network, for a two-person crew on-the-ground to try and fill, especially considering the 14-hour time difference between Toronto and Pyeongchang.”

To do this job, CBC Radio built a radio studio in the CBC Sports work-area inside the IBC. This studio consisted of a control room with a small Mackie console connected to a laptop, connected to an external monitor.

“On the other side of the glass, in an extremely well-built soundproof booth, there was a table and three comfy chairs,” said Parker. On the table were three Shure SM58 microphones in stands and three pairs of Sony broadcast headphones. This set-up allowed Parker to interview up to three athletes at a time, with him conducting recorded interviews at the board using a control room microphone.

“The studio was equipped with a Comrex Access Portable IP codec, so CBC studios at the headquarters in Toronto, or in regional locations across Canada, could connect directly and ‘go live’ or ‘live to tape’,” he said. “This happened on a few occasions with regional CBC shows that wanted to talk directly to an athlete from their city/area.”

CBC Radio had also had access to commentary positions rented by CBC Sports in a number of rink venues. For instance, at the Gangneung Ice Arena (figure skating/short track), a prime center-ice location was available.

“Our reporter and producer (me) went ‘Live’ from this position many times, covering two sports where Canadians were continual medal threats, and successfully delivered podium finishes,” said Parker. “As well, both Jamie and I did ‘Live’ hits from many other venues into CBC Radio shows using a portable Comrex Access with a network connection.”

WWO’S LARGER CREW

With 19 people on-site, Westwood One’s U.S. radio crew was gigantic compared to CBC Radio’s twosome — but minuscule against the roughly 2,500 personnel fielded by U.S. TV RHB NBC Sports in Pyeongchang.

“Our main hub was inside the International Broadcast Center in the Pyeongchang mountain cluster,” said Mike Eaby. He is Westwood One’s V.P. of Sports Administration, coordinating producer of its Pyeongchang Olympic coverage, and one of the 19 people who were based at the IBC. “Our IBC studios consisted of six rooms: Main studio, main studio control room, engineering room, two announce booths and a bullpen area,” Eaby said. “The studios were inside the massive NBC footprint at the IBC.”

In addition, Westwood One had commentary positions — “think tables in the stands or small booths in a press box,” said Eaby — at nine venues including Alpine Skiing 1 and 2, Hockey 1 and Hockey 2, the Olympic stadium, and the figure skating arena; among others.

“At each of the nine venues, we had a ‘mixed zone’ position in order to conduct quick one-on-one interviews as they leave the competitive arena,” he said. “Lastly, our New York studios were staffed by a handful of people 24 hours a day providing essential production support back home.”

“Keep in mind that our studios are built from scratch at each Olympics,” Eaby noted. “Our technical folks, Zach Akey and Leslie Kveton, did an outstanding job getting us up and running, then to have almost zero technical issues for three weeks is truly an accomplishment by them.”

To quote the Spiderman graphic novels, with great power comes great responsibility. In the case of Westwood One, having a larger crew (by radio standards) meant producing an incredible amount of content during the Winter Games.

“Each day (the night before back in the U.S.) we produced a two-hour show that consisted of athlete interviews, highlights and talk covering all the Olympic events,” said Eaby.

“We also broadcast each Team USA men’s hockey game, the Team USA women’s preliminary round game against Canada, and both men’s and women’s gold medal games. Lastly, we provided our stations with three Olympic updates (one minute of content) per hour around the clock for 17 days. Our talent was running from place to place, many times calling two events in the same day.” 

 CHALLENGES AND ACHIEVEMENTS 

 Clearly, both CBC Radio and Westwood One had a lot of radio content to produce, with only relatively bare-bones crews to get the job done. 

“As mentioned, the biggest challenge was that there was only two of us,” said Parker. “Best intentions aside, there were few moments when I could do ‘Live’ hits myself because I was too busy coordinating the overall project or rushing to the IBC to do athlete interviews. So ideally, a third person, and in particular, another reporter, would have been invaluable,” he said. 

 “The Alpine skiing proved to be a bit of a mess with all the scheduling issues,” added Eaby. “On three occasions, weather forced the Olympic organizers to schedule two ski events at the same time on two different mountains — and Westwood One only had one announce team. Fortunately, NBC was a huge help in getting us TV feeds from one mountain while in our broadcast booth at another.” 

 With so much to be done, a further challenge was ensuring that everyone didn’t get burnt out too fast, he added. “It’s a cliché, but the Olympics are truly a marathon and not a sprint. Keeping everyone focused while they lack sleep, miss friends and family back home and are running from place-to-place for three weeks is no small task. The Olympics is a grind.” 

[Hockey Dominates Radio’s 2018 Winter Olympics Coverage]

 Nevertheless, CBC Radio and Westwood One both created superb radio coverage during the 2018 Winter Games, despite having the smallest of crews and the biggest of missions. And despite the grind, the experience was rewarding for their hard-working crews. 

 “Being able to broadcast Team USA women’s hockey win over Canada to a national audience certainly ranks near the top for us.” said Eaby. “Even though we didn’t do as well as we would have liked from an American perspective, having figure skating, Alpine skiing and snowboarding live during our two-hour show made for some great theater.” 

 “We witnessed so many incredible moments, at a winter games packed with politics, passion for sport and incredible performances,” added Parker. “Radio-wise, you couldn’t get a better sound effect to work with than the exuberant chants of the North Korean cheerleading squads.” All of this begs the question: Does radio still have a meaningful role to play covering the TV-dominated Olympic Games? 

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 “Absolutely,” said Eaby. “With the multitude of platforms available nowadays, the public has options in which to consume their Olympics and we think we present a unique and exciting form of it. I’m proud of the coverage we provide to our listeners.” 

 “Without a doubt, TV gets all the spoils — and the Olympic Games give priority to the TV broadcasters,” said Parker. “But in a time when people want a choice on how and when they get their Olympic coverage, radio still matters. Many people continue to count on and appreciate the ability of a good radio storyteller to bring the faraway action into their ears, and imaginations.”     

Author: James Careless
Posted: May 20, 2018, 5:42 pm
As you know, I frequently have posts of futuristic items and what we have to look forward to, for this edition of Off the Beaten Path, I’m going to look at the past. Movie Locations of the Past This is an interesting website that shows some movie locations that have been used in the past, and how ...

Dan looks back at the past

As you know, I frequently have posts of futuristic items and what we have to look forward to, for this edition of Off the Beaten Path, I’m going to look at the past.

Movie Locations of the Past

This is an interesting website that shows some movie locations that have been used in the past, and how they look today.

The Invention of Cable TV

This is a great interview with one of the people who were innovators in the area of cable TV. Part of the reason for posting this is because I was fortunate to work for Tim, the son, of the innovator. This is an old recording of Claude Stevanus who brought cable TV to Ohio. Though it originated in Pennsylvania and California, Mr. Stevanus is credited with being one of the earliest implementers of this technology and bringing it to Ohio in 1952. To add some more interesting history, the Stevanus family recognized that these cable systems were in areas where the large market TV stations generally didn’t send news crews or have local coverage. Maybe he deserves credit as well for “local origination”? Here’s an early picture of “TV-2,” his local production for one of the areas of Ohio.

Now & Then Pics

Here’s a fun look at things from the past, and how they are sometimes seen today. It starts with Luke Skywalker. I think you’ll enjoy this.

1885 Sound

This was in the Radio World daily NewsBytes (if you haven’t signed up, you can get daily email of timely stories related to radio and cool stuff like this). The year was 1885, and the audio you’ll hear has been “magically” restored from Bell’s (not Edison’s) “Graphophone.” This story tells of the cool process used to bring the sound back out of this 130+ year old recording.

The Young Photos of Early World Leaders

Here are pics of world leaders (or, maybe more appropriately recognized as “people in positions of authority”) as some are famous and other infamous. It’s interesting to see youthful faces of these well-known people.

Early Audio Processing for Radio

We all know the big names in audio processors today, and there are some incredible processors out there! Early radio started with an engineer on a “master volume control” turning it up or down appropriately to become “the living Level Devil” (“Level Devil was an early AGC system for radio, hence the reference). This PDF explains the history of audio processing.

The Invention of Radio

Since this IS Radio World, we shouldn’t ignore our past. Though most of us know the history of radio (or I hope we do), here’s a website that reflects on the people who received credit for the innovation and early development. Yes, some of these could be disputed, but certainly recognizable names to our industry.

And finally ...

“Come on dowwwnnnn!” We’ve all seen TV game shows and those “faaabulous prizes,” but have you ever wondered what happens AFTER you win those prizes? Here’s the story.

If you stumble across a good or unusual website that might be of interest, please don’t hesitate to send me the link and any info you might have about it. My email address is dan_slentz@yahoo.com.

Author: Dan Slentz
Posted: May 19, 2018, 12:01 am
The author is membership program director of the National Federation of Community Broadcasters. NFCB commentaries are featured regularly at www.radioworld.com. When Federal Communications Commissioner Mignon Clyburn announced in April that she would leave her spot on the commission after nearly a ...

FCC Commissioner Clyburn leaves an important legacy

The author is membership program director of the National Federation of Community Broadcasters. NFCB commentaries are featured regularly at www.radioworld.com.

When Federal Communications Commissioner Mignon Clyburn announced in April that she would leave her spot on the commission after nearly a decade, many in community media certainly felt a hint of sadness mixed in with our joy for her next adventure.

With the end of her final month in the office, Clyburn’s departure comes at a formidable moment in Washington. She counts many victories of note, and many matters yet to be decided.

As a former owner of South Carolina newspaper The Coastal Times, and the first African-American woman appointed to the FCC, Clyburn came in with many expectations placed upon her. If she was stressed about the attention, Commission Clyburn seldom showed it. Always measured and thoughtful, she was quick to take a leadership role and the needs of all Americans seriously. “It is essential for each and every American to have access to the information they need, and to have their point of view represented during the decision-making process,” she said at a 2010 presentation, just a year into her tenure.

Perhaps it was that time as a newspaper owner that gave her a deeper sense of engaging the public. A passion for public input has been a hallmark of Commissioner Clyburn’s endeavors as part of the FCC. She’s issued many statements over the years encouraging input from citizens. She’s frequently pledged her dedication to reading their letters, too. “For my part, I pledge to look at the record with an open mind, and to treat each submission with the seriousness it deserves,” she said during one open call in 2009. “I am looking forward to an honest, open, and direct exchange to make sure we get this proceeding right.”

Clyburn earned a reputation as a fierce advocate for consumers. She’s spoken at town halls, rallies and campuses around the United States, addressing the rights of everyday Americans and the FCC’s obligation to protect them, such as in fighting exorbitant rates charged to families for phone calls to incarcerated sons, daughters and parents.

[Read: Community Broadcaster: Firing Line]

In related ways, Net Neutrality and an open internet have been major themes of her tenure. For community media organizations, many of which contend with internet access issues, the cost of broadband and streaming are concerns. Clyburn voted against Net Neutrality’s repeal and still speaks out. “What the FCC did was to depress — was to strip away the freedoms of the most enabling platform, the most equalizing platform of our time,” she said at a San Francisco event after the vote.

While Net Neutrality has been a lightning rod for attention, Clyburn has been active on issues affecting radio, including Native American, Latino and African-American-run organizations.

Commissioner Clyburn has been among the great champions of minority ownership in telecommunications and broadcasting. Her 2014 remarks on these issues with former Chair Tom Wheeler reflected a clarity about the necessity of diverse voices in media. She and Wheeler wrote:

“While there is widespread agreement on the need for progress, there has been very little by way of new ideas to solve the twin problems of access and opportunity. For several years, the only path available to minority entrepreneurs required troubling financial dependency and constrained programming choices. With the Media Bureau’s approval of several transactions today, however, we see the emergence of new ownership models that will not only bring more independent voices to the station ownership ranks in a manner that promotes diversity, competition and localism.”

[Read: Attention Turns to Post-Clyburn Opening]

Years later, Clyburn has held steady to these ideals. Earlier this year, during a C-SPAN visit she raised the issue of minority ownership in the tapestry of core worries about Net Neutrality. The specter of media consolidation limiting choice and undercutting localism are among the reasons many activists have expressed fears about the end of Net Neutrality. Clyburn was clear about the FCC’s role in such matters.

“People want action. They want results. They want decisions made as quickly as possible. And what agency is the best to do so?” she asked. “I think if you answer that question objectively, the buck needs to stop at the FCC.”

While who will be Clyburn’s replacement remains a subject of some currency, community radio leaders can only hope for and seek someone concerned about the interests of rural America, communities of color and all Americans the way the brilliant outgoing commissioner has been. She’ll be missed.

Author: Ernesto Aguilar
Posted: May 18, 2018, 8:12 pm
The competition among broadcast groups for radio advertising dollars continues to escalate, due in no small measure to new technologies. The revolution began with the introduction of programmatic ad buying, which streamlined what had been a cumbersome process. At the same time, the drive towards ...

Says new insights will enable advertisers to measure and optimize ad campaigns

The competition among broadcast groups for radio advertising dollars continues to escalate, due in no small measure to new technologies. The revolution began with the introduction of programmatic ad buying, which streamlined what had been a cumbersome process. At the same time, the drive towards better real-time analytics began. RW recently reported about Veritone’s announcement of partnerships with Beasley Media Group, Reach Media, the Tom Joyner Network, Townsquare Media and Results Radio, giving these broadcasters a license to use the Veritone aiWARE platform at their stations to process, transform, and review audio data in near real-time, with ad and content tracking, analytics.

The driving force behind much of this effort is bringing radio analysis to a parity with the traditionally more precise online media metrics. Now, iHeartMedia is jumping in with “iHeartMedia Analytics,” which it claims is the first fully-digital attribution service for broadcast radio. By leveraging the data from iHeartRadio’s digital ecosystem, the company claims, iHeartMedia will enable broadcast radio to measure and show results in the same way as digital media, giving advertisers easy access to campaign performance insights.

[Read: Veritone Announces Agreements With Broadcasters for Audio Analytics]

Brian Kaminsky, president of Revenue Operations and Insights for iHeartMedia, explained the logic behind this move: “We continue to see advertisers spend money on less effective mediums simply because they provide a perceived level of measurability and accountability. Now, marketers will be able to capitalize on the scale and reach of iHeartMedia’s more than 270 million monthly broadcast listeners. They can receive the same kind of real-time measurements, insights and custom reporting they are accustomed to getting from digital media, quantifying the full power of radio. In addition they can get attribution information that is missing from most of the digital marketplace.”

iHeartMedia Analytics is the latest addition to the company’s marketing optimization toolbox. It also includes SoundPoint, a programmatic real-time radio ad buying platform, and the recently introduced SmartAudio, which enables advertisers to do impression-based audience planning and dynamic radio ad creative that utilizes real-time triggers such as weather, pollen counts and sports scores.

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Author: Tom Vernon
Posted: May 18, 2018, 7:29 pm
NEW YORK — The YES Network is a regional sports network owned by 21st Century Fox and the New York Yankees. We cover New York Yankees baseball, Brooklyn Nets basketball and Major League Soccer’s New York City FC, along with other programming. I’ve served as director of technical operations for the ...

Video codec makes possible reliable simulcasts for sports network

NEW YORK — The YES Network is a regional sports network owned by 21st Century Fox and the New York Yankees. We cover New York Yankees baseball, Brooklyn Nets basketball and Major League Soccer’s New York City FC, along with other programming. I’ve served as director of technical operations for the YES Network since it was founded in 2002.

For a number of years, I’ve been coordinating remote broadcasts for “The Michael Kay Show.” Michael Kay is the play-by-play announcer for our Yankee baseball coverage and the headliner for the show, which is heard Monday through Friday from 3 to 7 p.m. on WEPN/ESPN Radio in New York. YES produces and airs a live video simulcast of that show with a simple one-camera setup.

Before adopting the Comrex LiveShot IP video codecs, our simulcast programming would go out via satellite at 9 MHz. I pay close attention to new developments and technology, and when I saw LiveShot and its competitors appearing on the market, I was intrigued.

I’d been familiar with Comrex for a long time. “The Michael Kay Show” is transmitted on ESPN Radio with Comrex’s Access box, so we were already using Comrex equipment regularly. In my experiences, the products I’ve used have been, in most cases, bulletproof; and the customer service is beyond reproach. So I was moved to learn more about LiveShot.

Initially, we used LiveShot and satellite simultaneously, but as we’ve gained confidence, we’ve switched fully to LiveShot. For “The Michael Kay Show,” we’re using LiveShot exclusively. The technology has been proven to work consistently, and we’ve gotten more comfortable trusting it with our broadcasts.

Recently, we’ve begun using LiveShot’s SD return video feed, and Michael Kay loves it. We place a monitor where he can see it clearly, and he can easily see when he’s in a two-box or when we’re in commercial. Return video has been an incredibly useful feature for us.

I’ve tried other bonded cellular products, and one of the reasons I ultimately chose Comrex is the history behind the company. Comrex has been in broadcasting for more than 50 years, and as noted, the customer service has been excellent. So far, any questions that we’ve had are answered instantly.

We’re very satisfied. The form-factor of LiveShot Portable is unique — it’s very portable and lightweight, which distinguishes it from other bonded cellular products. And LiveShot also contains some unique features, like two-way video and IFB capability. These features, combined with reliable customer service and bulletproof connections, made LiveShot the choice for us.

For information, contact Chris Crump at Comrex in Massachusetts at 978-784-1776 or visit www.comrex.com.

Author: Jack Kestenbaum, Director Of Technical Operations, Yes Network
Posted: May 18, 2018, 4:43 pm
Washington, DC May 18, 2018 – Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI), the global leader in rights management, will provide a performance by Nashville.-based music producer, writer, and artist DAVIE as part of its sponsorship of the Member Awards Ceremony to in conjunction with Media Finance Focus 2018, the 58 ...

Washington, DC May 18, 2018 Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI), the global leader in rights management, will provide a performance by Nashville.-based music producer, writer, and artist DAVIE as part of its sponsorship of the Member Awards Ceremony to in conjunction with Media Finance Focus 2018, the 58 annual conference for MFM – the Media Financial Management Association and its BCCA subsidiary, the media industry’s credit association. BMI is also sponsoring a performance by American Idol Top 50 contestant and CMT Artist Discovery, Julia Cole.

Media Finance Focus 2018 will be held from May 21-23 at The Hyatt Regency Crystal City (Arlington, VA). The MFM Awards Ceremony and Concert by DAVIE will be held on Tuesday evening, May 22. BMI songwriter Julia Cole will perform during a luncheon event on Wednesday, May 23 sponsored by Oracle NetSuite.

“This will mark the 23 year that BMI has supported MFM’s conference. We are doubly grateful that this year they are providing up-and-coming talent for two conference events, including the BMI-sponsored membership awards ceremony,” said Mary M. Collins, president and CEO of MFM and BCCA. “Much of the success of the media organizations our members represent is due to the creative talent nurtured by BMI and other performing rights organizations. We are delighted to have this annual opportunity to both celebrate and benefit from BMI’s contribution to the industry.”

“We are thrilled to be once again participating in the MFM/BCCA Membership Awards Ceremony celebrating the best in cable and broadcast media financial management,” said Dan Spears, Vice President, Industry Relations, BMI. “MFM and BCCA have been great partners in our pursuit to connect businesses that use music with its creators and showcasing talent such as DAVIE and Julia Cole only strengthens that mission.”

BMI songwriter DAVIE is a true master chef, described as combining myriad flavors of musical deliciousness, from Prince-ly synth-funk, to Curtis Mayfield-esque Chicago sweet soul magic, to modern leftfield Frank Oceanic waves, to picture perfect, passionate R&B ballads the likes of which would certainly turn the heads of Lionel and Stevie. There’s a refreshingly sparse, clean production style at work here that defines the confident and steadfast hand of this young L.A.-based producer/writer/artist.

Last August, DAVIE released his debut EP, Black Gospel Vol. 1, which featured “Testify,” a song prominently featured in the Wild Turkey “Sing Our Song” international TV campaign, where DAVIE starred alongside Matthew McConaughey. DAVIE has been touring most of the past year, including multiple runs with Juno Award winning singer-songwriter Ruth B. and more recently with SonReal. He’s seen a flurry of film/TV licensing activity including a spot on the EA Sports Madden NFL 18 soundtrack alongside luminaries Kendrick Lamar, Calvin Harris, and Logic. He’s scheduled to appear at Lollapalooza and Bonnaroo this summer. More information about DAVIE may be found on Facebook.

Julia Cole, a top 50 contestant on this spring’s American Idol, has created a fresh new sound true to her Houston, TX roots. Cole combines R&B with acoustic country, melodic pop, and soul. Her shows are high energy and always exciting. Ms. Cole has been selected as CMT's Next Artist Discovery and is also selectively featured on Spotify's curated country playlists as well as Spotify's new exclusive vertical video platform. This volleyball-playing Vanderbilt graduate is now on the road opening for acts such as Carrie Underwood, Kenny Chesney, The Chainsmokers, Love and Theft, Eli Young Band, Jake Owen, Chris Lane, Hunter Hayes, Kane Brown, Canaan Smith, Chase Rice, Jon Langston, Kevin Fowler and many more. Cole sings for many events by the NFL, MLB, MLS, NASA, SEC, NCAA, NASCAR and more. Cole incorporates her love for sports into her music career as much as possible. Her new 2018 project, the "Priority Acoustic Mixtape" debuted top 10 on iTunes and is available everywhere (YouTube, iTunes, Spotify, Apple Music, etc.)." More information about Julia may be found on her website.

ABOUT BMI:

Celebrating over 77 years of service to songwriters, composers, music publishers and businesses, Broadcast Music, Inc.® (BMI®) is a global leader in music rights management, serving as an advocate for the value of music. BMI represents the public performance rights in nearly 13 million musical works created and owned by more than 800,000 songwriters, composers, and music publishers. The Company negotiates music license agreements and distributes the fees it generates as royalties to its affiliated writers and publishers when their songs are performed in public. In 1939, BMI created a groundbreaking open-door policy becoming the only performing rights organization to welcome and represent the creators of blues, jazz, country, and American roots music. Today, the musical compositions in BMI’s repertoire, from chart toppers to perennial favorites, span all genres of music and are consistently among the most-performed hits of the year. For additional information and the latest BMI news, visit bmi.com, follow us on Twitter @BMI or stay connected through Broadcast Music, Inc.‘s Facebook page. Sign up for BMI’s The Weekly™ and receive our e-newsletter every Monday to stay up to date on all things music.

About Media Finance Focus 2018:

MFM/BCCA’s annual conference is the primary source of professional education for the media industry’s business and credit management executives, including its digital media, video, games, publishing, broadcasting and broadband telecommunications enterprises. Chaired by Cindy Pekrul, SVP and deputy controller for Turner and vice chair of MFM’s board of directors, and co-chaired by Mike Lavey, SVP/corporate controller for tronc, Inc. and MFM board secretary, Media Finance Focus 2018 will feature presentations from over 150 industry experts, who will provide timely information on topics relevant to media industry finance professionals, including accounting, economic projections, valuations, M&A, taxes, legal, regulatory, and technological developments and internal audit.

BCCA, the media industry’s credit association, will provide a full track of sessions designed to meet the needs of today’s credit and collections professionals. In addition, Media Finance Focus 2018 is collaborating with the Media Industry Tax Group on offering a full track of tax-related topics of interest to the media industry’s tax professionals and the New Media Internal Auditors Association is co-locating its 2018 meeting with the conference, providing its members an opportunity to participate in sessions offered by both events. New in 2018 is a track dedicated to finance professionals working with video games and other entertainment software. The conference will also offer formal and informal networking activities to foster idea sharing and will host an exhibit hall featuring the latest in products and services for addressing the industry’s financial management and credit and collections requirements. Registered participants can earn 19 or more CPE credits. Additional information about Media Finance Focus 2018 may be found on the conference website.

About MFM and BCCA:

Media Financial Management Association (MFM) is the premiere resource for financial professionals for media industry education, networking, and information sharing throughout the U.S. and Canada. More information about MFM is available on its Web site: http://www.mediafinance.org and via its updates on Linkedin, Facebook and Twitter. Its BCCA subsidiary serves as the media industry’s credit association. BCCA’s revenue management services encompass a variety of credit reports on national and local media advertisers and agencies, including Media Whys, a credit report for media businesses which offers a credit score based on industry-specific aging combined with trade data from Experian or D+B. More information about BCCA is available at http://www.bccacredit.com as well as its updates on Linkedin, Facebook and Twitter.

Author: Media Financial Management Association
Posted: May 18, 2018, 3:20 pm