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GENEVA, Switzerland — Nov. 12, 2018 — DVB, an industry consortium that develops open interoperable technical specifications for the delivery of digital media and broadcast services, today announced that it has collaborated with the HbbTV Association to create a DASH validation tool for application ...

DVB, an industry consortium that develops open interoperable technical specifications for the delivery of digital media and broadcast services, today announced that it has collaborated with the HbbTV Association to create a DASH validation tool for application developers and content providers. The newly released tool conducts checks of ISO/IEC 23009-1 MPEG-DASH media presentation descriptions (MPDs) and segments to ensure conformance with DASH-related specifications from DVB and HbbTV.

GENEVA, Switzerland — Nov. 12, 2018 — DVB, an industry consortium that develops open interoperable technical specifications for the delivery of digital media and broadcast services, today announced that it has collaborated with the HbbTV Association to create a DASH validation tool for application developers and content providers. The newly released tool conducts checks of ISO/IEC 23009-1 MPEG-DASH media presentation descriptions (MPDs) and segments to ensure conformance with DASH-related specifications from DVB and HbbTV.

"DVB and HbbTV have a close relationship and common membership, making this the perfect partnership," said Peter MacAvock, chair of DVB. "Content delivery is becoming increasingly complex. Working together, we are bringing simplicity to content conformance for DASH-delivered streams."

Extending the existing DASH-IF validator, the new tool includes: 

• Comprehensive checks for MPEG-DASH MPD validation (XML, DASH schema, and MPEG-DASH MPD rules), segment validation (ISO BMFF and MPEG-DASH segment rules), cross-representation validation (MPEG-DASH cross-representation rules), and live MPD segment access validation. 

• Compliance with a wide range of specifications.

• Support for DVB-DASH Profile v1.1.1 and HbbTV 1.5 extensions.

After performing conformance checks, the new tool generates reports for users to analyse. The reports are colour-coded, making it easy to see important information, warnings, and error messages. Additionally, the tool complements the HbbTV Association DRM Reference Application and Test Suite, providing device manufacturers with examples of working applications and content with DRM.

"We are excited about the release of this DASH validation tool, which will help application developers and content providers verify that their services are compliant with the HbbTV/DVB DASH profiles, enabling them to offer compelling hybrid services that enhance the viewer experience," said Vincent Grivet, chair of the HbbTV Association.

DVB-DASH defines the delivery of live and on-demand TV content over the open internet via HTTP adaptive streaming. By defining additional constraints and referencing a selection of video and audio codecs from the DVB toolbox as being technically appropriate for use with MPEG-DASH, DVB-DASH facilitates implementation of the MPEG-DASH specification. DVB-DASH is referenced in the HbbTV specifications, which means that many devices on the market currently support this profile. Content providers across Europe have deployed services using DVB-DASH.

The validator source code is now available for free under an open source license and can be found by visiting https://github.com/Dash-Industry-Forum/Conformance-Software.

More information on support for HbbTV application developers can be found at https://www.hbbtv.org/resource-library/developer-support/.

More information about DVB is available at www.dvb.org.

# # #

About the HbbTV Association

Hybrid broadcast broadband TV (or "HbbTV") is a global initiative aimed at harmonising the broadcast and broadband delivery of entertainment services to consumers through connected TVs, set-top boxes and multiscreen devices. The HbbTV specification is developed by industry leaders to improve the video user experience for consumers by enabling innovative, interactive services over networks. The specification uses elements of existing specifications from other standards including OIPF, CEA, DVB, MPEG-DASH and W3C. With the incorporation of activities from the Open IPTV Forum (OIPF) in 2014 and Smart TV Alliance in 2016, HbbTV is able to address service providers and technology suppliers for IPTV services as well as the combined scope of broadcast and over-the-top (OTT) services. More information: https://www.hbbtv.org.

This year, the 7th HbbTV Symposium and Awards will take place on November 14-15 in Berlin. Registration is possible here. The Symposium is in collaboration with Deutsche TV-Plattform and the overall theme is "Growing Value Through HbbTV." More information: https://www.hbbtv.org/news-events/hbbtv-symposium-and-awards/.

About DVB (www.dvb.org)

DVB is an industry-led consortium of broadcasters, manufacturers, network operators, software developers, regulators, and others from around the world committed to designing open interoperable technical specifications for the global delivery of digital media and broadcast services. DVB specifications cover all aspects of digital television from transmission through interfacing; conditional access; and interactivity for digital video, audio, and data. DVB dominates the digital broadcasting environment with thousands of broadcast services around the world using DVB specifications. There are hundreds of manufacturers offering DVB-compliant equipment. To date, there are more than a billion DVB receivers shipped worldwide.

Further information about DVB can be found at: www.dvb.org, www.dvbservices.com, and www.dvbworld.org.

DVB and DVB sub-brands are registered trademarks.

Link to Word Doc: www.202comms.com/DVB/181112DVB.docx

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All trademarks appearing herein are the property of their respective owners.

Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: November 12, 2018, 10:17 pm
CAPE TOWN, South Africa — Nov. 12, 2018 — At AfricaCom 2018, Broadpeak®, a leading provider of content delivery network (CDN) and video streaming solutions for content providers and pay-TV operators worldwide, will showcase its solution for OTT multiscreen video delivery via DVB-T2 networks with ...

OTT Multiscreen Video Delivery Over Terrestrial Networks is Scalable and Cost-Effective With Broadpeak's nanoCDN™ Multicast ABR Solution

CAPE TOWN, South Africa — Nov. 12, 2018 — At AfricaCom 2018, Broadpeak®, a leading provider of content delivery network (CDN) and video streaming solutions for content providers and pay-TV operators worldwide, will showcase its solution for OTT multiscreen video delivery via DVB-T2 networks with SENTECH, a leading Digital Terrestrial Television (DTT) service provider in sub-Saharan Africa. During the demo, SENTECH will rely on Broadpeak's nanoCDN™ multicast ABR solution and third-party technologies from Teamcast and Noovo to cost-efficiently deliver high-quality video to all screens.

"We are excited to expand our footprint into OTT and CDN environments in the near future and address the growing consumer demand for television on every screen," said Mlamli Booi, the CEO of SENTECH. "SENTECH has been exploring an innovative solution to deliver data and OTT content over DTT networks for quite some time now. AfricaCom is the perfect opportunity to demo how Sentech and Broadpeak are leading the way for solving the scalability and cost- constraint issues linked to OTT multiscreen delivery over terrestrial networks in Africa. This will really sweat the DTT infrastructure, already commissioned in South Africa and the rest of Africa, allowing both rural and urban to have the same experience of OTT offerings."

During the demo, SENTECH will use Broadpeak's BkE200 transcaster server to transform unicast streams into multicast. Broadpeak's nanoCDN agent will be deployed in DVB-T2 home gateways from Noovo to convert multicast streams back into unicast and deliver the content to ABR devices. Teamcast will provide encapsulation and DVB-T2 modulation technologies. The solution enables the delivery of video content to millions of simultaneous viewers using a single multicast session over the network.

"The African OTT market is booming, and we are thrilled to partner with SENTECH, Teamcast, and Noovo to facilitate its growth," said Jacques Le Mancq, CEO at Broadpeak. "By testing out multicast ABR technology for OTT multiscreen service delivery via DVB-T2, SENTECH is positioning itself as a broadcast leader in Africa."

nanoCDN is changing the face of OTT delivery via terrestrial networks by enabling service providers like SENTECH to deliver live and VOD content to STBs and mobile devices in a way that is scalable and cost-effective.

Broadpeak will showcase its CDN and video streaming solutions at AfricaCom 2018 Nov. 13-15 in Cape Town at stand K6A (part of the Africa Video Forum).

The joint partner demo of OTT video delivery via DVB-T2 networks will take place at the SENTECH stand at the AVF Networking Hub/M4.

More information about Broadpeak solutions can be found at https://broadpeak.tv.

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About Broadpeak (https://broadpeak.tv)

Broadpeak® designs and manufactures video delivery components for content providers and network service providers deploying IPTV, cable, OTT, and mobile services. Its portfolio of solutions and technologies powers the delivery of movies, television programming, and other video content over managed networks and the Internet for viewing on any type of device. The company's systems and services help operators increase market share and improve subscriber loyalty with superior quality of experience.

Broadpeak supports all of its customers worldwide, from simple installations to large delivery systems reaching capacities of several million of simultaneous streams. The company is headquartered in Cesson-Sevigne, France.

All trademarks appearing herein are the property of their respective owners.

Link to Word Doc: www.202comms.com/Broadpeak/181112Broadpeak.docx

Visit Broadpeak® at AfricaCom, Stand K6A

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Photo Link: www.202comms.com/Broadpeak/Broadpeak-SentechAfricacom2018Demo.png

Photo Caption: Broadpeak® Live OTT Over DVB-T2 AfricaCom 2018 Demo

Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: November 12, 2018, 10:05 pm
SAN JOSE, Calif. — Nov. 12, 2018 — Harmonic (NASDAQ: HLIT) today announced that SKY Perfect JSAT Corporation (SJC), a leading multi-channel pay TV platform operator in Japan, is upgrading its DTH headend to support HD and UHD delivery using an IP-based video and stream processing solution from ...

Leveraging Harmonic's Software-Based Solutions, SKY Perfect JSAT Deploys Cutting-Edge UHD and HD Services With Unprecedented Operational Efficiency

SAN JOSE, Calif. — Nov. 12, 2018 — Harmonic (NASDAQ: HLIT) today announced that SKY Perfect JSAT Corporation (SJC), a leading multi-channel pay TV platform operator in Japan, is upgrading its DTH headend to support HD and UHD delivery using an IP-based video and stream processing solution from Harmonic. SJC has also deployed an integrated playout solution from Harmonic to simplify the delivery of HD channels. Harmonic's solutions rely on software-based and intelligent function integration to enable seamless channel expansion, increase cost savings and deliver exceptional video quality to SKY PerfecTV! subscribers at low bitrates.

"As the only multi-channel pay TV platform operator covering Japan, we have millions of subscribers counting on us to deliver a world-class entertainment experience," said Shuhei Yamaura, managing executive officer, broadcasting engineering group at SJC. "Harmonic has been a long-standing technology partner in helping us transition to software-based systems and an industry frontrunner in delivering HD and UHD channels. As we unleash over 180 HD and six UHD channels for MPEG-2, H.264 and HEVC distribution, Harmonic's video platforms will provide exceptional efficiency through software and intelligent function collapse."

SJC is using Harmonic's Electra® video processing and ProStream® X stream processing solutions to ensure optimal HD and UHD video quality, as well as bandwidth efficiency for their new DTH headend. The Electra and ProStream X platform increases SJC's operational efficiencies and cost savings via the use of COTS servers.

Harmonic's market-leading Spectrum™ X media server features channel-in-a-box capabilities that allow SKY PerfecTV! to deliver a rich on-air presentation to subscribers. By reducing the number of individual components required to air fully branded channels, Harmonic's integrated playout solution decreases equipment, maintenance and power costs.

"We are proud to launch UHD channels at SKY PerfecTV! in Japan, where UHD is at the forefront and leading higher resolution video experiences around the world," said Shahar Bar, senior vice president, corporate development at Harmonic. "SJC chose Harmonic for this upgrade based on our proven track record in helping operators around the globe transition their video processing infrastructure towards software-based technologies while maintaining the highest standard of quality and reliability."

Further information about Harmonic and the company's solutions is available at www.harmonicinc.com.

# # #

About Harmonic

Harmonic (NASDAQ: HLIT), the worldwide leader in video delivery technology and services, enables media companies and service providers to deliver ultra-high-quality broadcast and OTT video services to consumers globally. The company has also revolutionized cable access networking via the industry's first virtualized cable access solution, enabling cable operators to more flexibly deploy gigabit internet service to consumers' homes and mobile devices. Whether simplifying OTT video delivery via innovative cloud and SaaS technologies, or powering the delivery of gigabit internet cable services, Harmonic is changing the way media companies and service providers monetize live and VOD content on every screen. More information is available at www.harmonicinc.com.

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Statements concerning Harmonic's business and the anticipated capabilities, advantages, reliability, efficiency, market acceptance, market growth, specifications and benefits of Harmonic products, services and technology are forward-looking statements. These statements are based on our current expectations and beliefs and are subject to risks and uncertainties, including the risks and uncertainties more fully described in Harmonic's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended Dec. 31, 2017, its Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and its Current Reports on Form 8-K. The forward-looking statements in this press release are based on information available to Harmonic as of the date hereof, and Harmonic disclaims any obligation to update any forward-looking statements.

Harmonic, the Harmonic logo and other Harmonic marks are owned by Harmonic Inc. or its affiliates. All other trademarks referenced herein are the property of their respective owners.

Link to Word Doc: www.202comms.com/Harmonic/181112Harmonic.docx

Please visit Harmonic at Inter BEE 2018 — Hall 6, Stand 6212 

 

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Photo Link: www.202comms.com/Harmonic/Harmonic-SpectrumX.jpg

Photo Caption: Harmonic Spectrum™ X Media Server Platform

Photo Link: www.202comms.com/Harmonic/Harmonic-Electra.jpg

Photo Caption: Harmonic Electra® Video Processing Solution

Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: November 12, 2018, 9:53 pm
Avondale, Ariz., Nov. 12, 2018 – Fast cars, fast trucks, and even faster audio and video feeds. Students from The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS; www.cras.edu), the premier institution for audio engineering education, recently had the opportunity to practice mixing live audio ...

Avondale, Ariz., Nov. 12, 2018 – Fast cars, fast trucks, and even faster audio and video feeds.

Students from The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS; www.cras.edu), the premier institution for audio engineering education, recently had the opportunity to practice mixing live audio and video feeds from host broadcaster NBC SPORTS in the school’s 42-ft. remote-production mobile broadcast trailer during The Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series Can-Am 500, NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Lucas Oil 150, and NASCAR Xfinity Series Whelen Trusted To Perform 200 races at ISM Raceway in Avondale, Ariz. from Nov. 9-11.

“Orchestrated by Sports Broadcast Hall of Fame inductee Fred Aldous, our students received audio and video feeds as well as the directors’ and producers’ directives from FOX SPORTS on Friday for the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series race, and Saturday and Sunday they received the feeds from NBC Sports for the Xfinity Series and the Can-Am 500 races,” explained Kirt Hamm, CRAS administrator “We had 11 students per day per race event. The entire experience was an eye opener and a tremendous learning experience for them, that’s for sure.”

Robert Brock, CRAS Director of Education, added, “A1 Denis Ryan, Submixer Steve Urick, and Audio Guarantee Sean Peacock all took time to encourage our students and shoot straight with them about what it takes to succeed at their level. For our students to be able to hear this from professionals at this level as they work during a major nationally broadcast sporting event is absolutely priceless.”

Prior to the races, the CRAS student teams walked the track to study the microphone placements as well as the interconnect between the track feeds and the broadcast trucks. During the races they mixed the feeds in simulated real-world situations.

“When I was starting out I would have given my eyeteeth to have had the kind of opportunity that CRAS is providing their students out here,” said Denis Ryan, NBC Sports A1.

CRAS’ 42-ft. remote-production mobile broadcast unit is designed to be a working replica of a real-world broadcast production trailer stocked with top shelf industry professional audio and video equipment that are utilized by leading television network broadcast engineer crews.

“This event allows our future audio engineers to experience a part of the industry that has special demands and skill sets,” Hamm continued. “It helps our students identify if this is a passion area that they want to pursue after completion of our program and enter the Live Broadcast industry on their 280 hour internship, which is part of graduation requirements. We cannot thank NBC SPORTS enough for allowing us these opportunities for our students to interact with their teams throughout the weekend. Their crews are the best in the business and are always very gracious with their time and willing to share their insights and methods with us.”

The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences is composed of two nearby campuses in Gilbert and Tempe, Ariz. A CRAS education includes broadcast audio, live sound, film and TV audio, music, and video game audio, all taught by award-winning instructors who have all excelled in their individual fields, including sound reinforcement, audio recording and production, digital recording, troubleshooting/maintenance, and music business.

CRAS structured programs and highly qualified teaching staff provide a professional and supportive atmosphere, which is complemented by its small class sizes allowing for individual instruction and assistance for students in engineering audio recordings. CRAS has been providing quality vocational training in audio recording for more than three decades. The curriculum and equipment are constantly being updated to keep pace with the rapid advancements in the music and sound recording industries. CRAS’ course offerings and subject matter have always centered around the skills and knowledge necessary for students’ success in the audio recording industries.

The 11-month program is designed to allow every student access to learn and train in all of the Conservatory’s studios which are comprised with state-of-the-art audio recording and mixing gear, the same equipment used in today’s finest studios and remote broadcast facilities, including Pro Tools 12, API Legacy consoles, SSL AWS consoles, Studer Vista consoles, and much more. All students must complete a 280-hour industry internship to graduate from the Master Recording Program II that may ultimately lead to industry employment.

For more information on the Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences, please visit www.cras.edu, contact Kirt Hamm, administrator, at 1-800-562-6383, or email to info@cras.edu.

About The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences

Based in the heart of The Valley of the Sun with two campuses in Gilbert and Tempe, Ariz., The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS) is one of the country’s premier institutions for audio education. The Conservatory has developed a unique and highly effective way to help the future audio professional launch their careers in the recording industry and other related professional audio categories.

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Author: Charles Leib
Posted: November 12, 2018, 5:29 pm
Pure, a series about the insular world of the Mennonite community and a pastor’s double life within it, debuts on WGN America Jan. 23. Ryan Robbins and Alex Paxton-Beesley are in the cast, along with A.J. Buckley and Rosie Perez. The show depicts a “journey down a secretive subculture through the ...

Mennonite pastor in the middle of sticky drug ring and crime syndicate

Pure, a series about the insular world of the Mennonite community and a pastor’s double life within it, debuts on WGN America Jan. 23. Ryan Robbins and Alex Paxton-Beesley are in the cast, along with A.J. Buckley and Rosie Perez.

The show depicts a “journey down a secretive subculture through the eyes of a conflicted, good-hearted man trying to shield his family and preserve his faith,” in WGN America’s words. The pastor seeks to protect his family from a crime syndicate.

At the center of Pure is Noah Funk (Robbins), a newly elected Mennonite pastor seeking to rid drugs and corruption from his community, but he gets pulled into the drug ring he is fighting. Hand in hand with his wife, Anna (Paxton-Beesley), they battle a world of violence and greed from the inside out.

WGN America has greenlit a second season of Pure, with Alyson Hannigan on board as a recurring guest star. Season two is set to premiere later in 2019.

Pure is produced by Two East Productions and Cineflix in association with WGN America, Super Channel, Hulu and the CBC. The series is created and written by Michael Amo with Ken Girotti the director. Amo and Girotti will executive produce the second season, along with Brett Burlock, Peter Emerson and David MacLeod.

WGN America is part of Tribune Media Company. 

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: November 12, 2018, 5:02 pm
Fremont, CA – November 12, 2018 - Blackmagic Design today announced that the new film “The Oath” was shot with several URSA Mini Pro digital film cameras and edited and graded with DaVinci Resolve Studio, its professional editing, grading, audio post and visual effects software. Written, directed ...

Blackmagic Design today announced that the new film “The Oath” was shot with several URSA Mini Pro digital film cameras and edited and graded with DaVinci Resolve Studio, its professional editing, grading, audio post and visual effects software.

Fremont, CA – November 12, 2018 - Blackmagic Design today announced that the new film “The Oath” was shot with several URSA Mini Pro digital film cameras and edited and graded with DaVinci Resolve Studio, its professional editing, grading, audio post and visual effects software.

Written, directed by and starring Ike Barinholtz, “The Oath” also stars Tiffany Haddish, Billy Magnussen, John Cho, Carrie Brownstein and more. Recently premiered at the LA Film Festival and currently in theaters, the independent film explores how in a politically divided America, a man struggles to survive Thanksgiving without destroying his family. After the government mandates that all American citizens sign “The Patriot’s Oath,” tensions mount as everyone gets together under one roof for the holiday.

DP Cary Lalonde used an URSA Mini Pro PL and two URSA Mini Pro EFs while shooting the film, along with a Video Assist 4K monitor and recorder, and then Colorist Mark Sachen and Editor Jack Price used DaVinci Resolve Studio during the film’s post production. The post production work was done at Los Angeles based post facility Sugar Studios LA, which was equipped with a DaVinci Resolve Advanced Panel for the grading work.

“The URSA Mini Pro’s design and interface are very intuitive. During the shoot, all three cameras were equipped with URSA Viewfinders, and everything from their placement to the cameras’ dials and buttons felt very natural,” said Lalonde. “Having ND filters available at our fingertips helped save time while shooting, since we were able to easily dial ND in and out as lighting conditions changed during exterior shoots.”

According to Lalonde, the URSA Mini Pro footage easily matched the other cameras in the shooting package, so they didn’t need to worry about consistency issues. “For example, in one setup we used the URSA Mini Pro PL alongside two other cameras to capture a six person group scene. We used three cameras to shoot in three different directions at the same time, which was the most efficient way to shoot a four page scene in one setup. Each camera was set to a flat two shot, which worked well for the improvisational nature of the scene.”

Lalonde and the crew also used the two URSA Mini Pro EFs to capture establishing shots. Lalonde explained, “This was especially helpful during the ‘magic hour’ as the sun was setting. To help show the progression of the film, we wanted to establish the house in daytime and nighttime, with traditional and nontraditional camera angels, so we could match the style of the house to the mood of the film. The film starts very traditionally but there’s a sense of derailment as the story progresses.”

Sachen then used DaVinci Resolve Studio on set to grade dailies, as well as for the final grade. While working on set, Sachen also helped with assistant editing work by inputting metadata, synching the dailies, creating string outs and more with DaVinci Resolve Studio. Price was then able to stay in DaVinci Resolve Studio to complete the film’s edit.

“While editing, I’m a big proponent of using split screens for different takes to ensure that we’re using an actor’s best performance, even if it’s a nonverbal reaction. This came into play a lot in ‘The Oath,’ especially since the characters are being inundated with news broadcasts throughout the film,” explained Price. “Picture in picture comps and image stabilization were a piece of cake in DaVinci Resolve Studio.”

“Overall, DaVinci Resolve Studio’s layout and keyboard shortcuts are very intuitive. With editing, ultimately the less time spent trying to leap over technical hurdles and the more time spent on storytelling and emotion, the better,” continued Price. “There’s an astronomical number of bells and whistles within DaVinci Resolve Studio. If you’re looking for a certain feature, chances are it’s there. Its video playback is also extremely sophisticated, to the extent where I was able to edit native 2K ProRes 4444 files on a MacBook Pro with ease.”

Press Photography

Product photos of URSA Mini Pro, DaVinci Resolve Studio, Video Assist 4K, DaVinci Resolve Advanced Panel, URSA Viewfinder and all other Blackmagic Design products are available at www.blackmagicdesign.com/media/images

About Blackmagic Design

Blackmagic Design creates the world’s highest quality video editing products, digital film cameras, color correctors, video converters, video monitoring, routers, live production switchers, disk recorders, waveform monitors and real time film scanners for the feature film, post production and television broadcast industries. Blackmagic Design’s DeckLink capture cards launched a revolution in quality and affordability in post production, while the company’s Emmy™ award winning DaVinci color correction products have dominated the television and film industry since 1984. Blackmagic Design continues ground breaking innovations including 6G-SDI and 12G-SDI products and stereoscopic 3D and Ultra HD workflows. Founded by world leading post production editors and engineers, Blackmagic Design has offices in the USA, UK, Japan, Singapore and Australia. For more information, please go to www.blackmagicdesign.com.

Author: Ray Ecke
Posted: November 12, 2018, 2:22 pm
OWN is planning a special based on Oprah Winfrey’s recent interview with first lady Michelle Obama about her new book, Becoming. The special, Oprah Winfrey Presents: Becoming Michelle Obama, is scheduled to appear on Nov. 15 at 8 p.m. ET/PT. An extended, unedited version of the interview will be ...

Scheduled to air Nov. 15

OWN is planning a special based on Oprah Winfrey’s recent interview with first lady Michelle Obama about her new book, Becoming.

Michelle Obama and Oprah Winfrey.

The special, Oprah Winfrey Presents: Becoming Michelle Obama, is scheduled to appear on Nov. 15 at 8 p.m. ET/PT.

An extended, unedited version of the interview will be available on Oprah’s SuperSoul Conversations podcast and will be streamed on Oprah’s Facebook page on Sunday.

The interview will also be featured in Hearst’s O, The Oprah Magazine and in other Hearst periodicals.

Becoming is also the newest selection for Oprah’s book club.

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: November 12, 2018, 2:20 pm
MTV said it agreed to acquire the SnowGlobe Music Festival, expanding its live events business. SnowGlobe is an annual three-day music festival taking place Dec. 29-31 in South Lake Tahoe, Calif., that includes a countdown to New Year’s. Financial terms were not disclosed. MTV is part of Viacom, ...

Network plans more dates, venues for music festival

MTV said it agreed to acquire the SnowGlobe Music Festival, expanding its live events business.

SnowGlobe is an annual three-day music festival taking place Dec. 29-31 in South Lake Tahoe, Calif., that includes a countdown to New Year’s.

Financial terms were not disclosed.

MTV is part of Viacom, which has also been expanding the live experiences it offers fans at a time when the cable TV network business is difficult. Viacom in February acquired VidCom, the online video creators convention, and its cable channels are launching events like Nickelodeon’s Slimefest and Comedy Central’s ClusterFest.

Viacom has also aimed to diversify its business by acquiring digital video company AwsomenessTV in July and influencer marketing specialist Whosay in January.

MTV plans to expand SnowGlobe to additional dates and locations worldwide and launch other new events. SnowGlobe will also become part of MTV’s New Year’s Eve coverage, connected to the network’s live celebration at its Time Square studio in New York.

“With SnowGlobe, MTV is taking the natural next step in its resurgence by expanding deeper into live events, as we continue to reach our fans and capitalize on our strong brand in new ways,” said Chris McCarthy, president of MTV, VH1, CMT, and Logo. “In a festival space where many events have become indistinguishable, SnowGlobe stands out with a unique mix of music, sports, and art that makes it a favorite among artists and its growing audience.”

MTV’s portfolio of international events attract more than half a million attendees each year, the network said. In addition to the Video Music Awards in the U.S., MTV mounts the MTV EMAs in Europe, the MIAWs in Mexico and Brazil and Isle of MTV in Malta,

Now in its eighth year, the SnowGlobe 2018 lineup is headlined by  Above & Beyond, Diplo, Eric Prydz, Rezz and RL Grime with more than 40 artists performing on three stages. SnowGlobe will also feature all-new art installations and the festival’s signature Big Air activation showcasing extreme winter sports demonstrations.

"With SnowGlobe, we’ve always endeavored to create an event experience that sets itself apart from the typical music festival model,” said Chad Donnelly, CEO of SnowGlobe, “We are incredibly excited to be joining the MTV family, whose legacy of developing boundary breaking programming and events perfectly aligns with our long-standing ambition of creative innovation.”

SnowGlobe has featured acts including Childish Gambino, Tiesto, Disclosure, Flume, Snoop Dogg, Major Lazer, Post Malone, Odesza, The Chainsmokers, G-Eazy, Wiz Khalifa, Kaskade, Phantogram and many more. Last year’s event featured performances by Travis Scott, Khalid, Zedd and Dillon Francis.

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: November 12, 2018, 2:00 pm
A+E Networks and AMC Networks are beta testing Comscore Campaign Ratings, the company’s cross-platform ad measurement product. “As consumers are engaging with History, Lifetime and A&E programming across multiple platforms, it is important that we understand and measure the impact of ...

Product measures video ads across platforms

A+E Networks and AMC Networks are beta testing Comscore Campaign Ratings, the company’s cross-platform ad measurement product.

“As consumers are engaging with History, Lifetime and A&E programming across multiple platforms, it is important that we understand and measure the impact of advertising,” said Don Robert, executive VP, research, at A+E Networks. “Our goal is to measure the unduplicated audience across linear TV and digital platforms so that no audience is discounted.”

The Comscore Campaign Ratings beta program launched in September of this year in consortium with 12 media brand partners.

Related: Comscore Brings Contextual Technology to Adobe Ad Clients

“In a convergent television environment, it’s critical for us to measure and understand our audiences and the overlap between platforms,” said Tom Ziangas, senior VP of reserach at AMC Networks. “This product addresses our advertisers core need to quantify unduplicated audiences, as well as allows us to better articulate our strengths across linear TV and digital.”

Comscore, which started in digital measurement, has expanded into TV where it would be taking on market leader Nielsen. After a delay caused by the discovery of accounting issues three years ago that resulted in an arduous re-audit of its financial statements, the company has begun to offer new products aimed at cross-platform video measurement.

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: November 12, 2018, 1:41 pm
Cartoon Network has powerful plans for the 20th anniversary of the Powerpuff Girls. Cartoon will stream 72 straight hours of both the remastered and original Powerpuff Girls series on CN.com The network will also be showing an original music video created by female animators from around the world. ...

Network recruiting for internship program

Cartoon Network has powerful plans for the 20th anniversary of the Powerpuff Girls.

Cartoon will stream 72 straight hours of both the remastered and original Powerpuff Girls series on CN.com

The network will also be showing an original music video created by female animators from around the world.

Cartoon Network is launching an Empowerpuff internship program seeking people to work behind the scenes in production and marketing while acting as advocates for empowerment, confidence, positivity, sisterhood and self respect across the channel’s social platforms.

Fan will be able to mark the anniversary with a exclusive Empowerpuff sweater from Lingua Franca. The made-to-order cashmere sweater can be purchased only via email. Profits will be donated to The Lower East Side Girls Club.

Bubbles, Blossom and Buttercup

Powerpuff Girls debuted on Cartoon Network and ran through 2005. It features three girls with superpowers---Blossom, Bubbles and Buttercup--who fight crime in Townsville U.S.A.

Cartoon Network rebooted the Powerpuff Girls with a new animated series that aired in 2016.

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: November 12, 2018, 1:00 pm
Chip and Joanna Gaines, who ended their popular HGTV home renovation series Fixer Upper last year to spend more time with their family, are starting a new TV network with Discovery. The couple went on the Tonight Show Friday night to announced their return to TV and new business venture. “We’re ...

Chip and Joanna Gaines announce plans on ‘Tonight Show’

Chip and Joanna Gaines, who ended their popular HGTV home renovation series Fixer Upper last year to spend more time with their family, are starting a new TV network with Discovery.

The couple went on the Tonight Show Friday night to announced their return to TV and new business venture.

“We’re coming back to television,” Chip Gaines told Jimmy Fallon.

Related: 'Brady Bunch' Cast Reunites for Renovation of Brady Home

On the show, he didn’t provide a lot of details about the new network.

“Long story short, we learned a lot through the five-year process of being on Fixer Upper and I think some of the things that really caused us the most problems, we have concluded I think we can figure this out so we’ve actually partnered with [Discovery CEO] David Zaslav and Discovery,” he said. “We’re going to have a network and I think we’re going to really carve it out in a way that really makes sense to us and our families.”

Gaines said a lot of the filming they do will take place in Waco, Texas, where they live. “So we don’t have to travel a whole lot. So all things being equal, we could not be more excited,” he said.

In a statement, Discovery said the announcement wasn't official yet, but it was working with the couple on what it termed a TV network and ecosystem.

“Discovery is thrilled to confirm that we are in exclusive talks with Chip and Joanna Gaines. The Gaineses are exceptional people, true authentic storytellers and creative visionaries who will nourish millions of people with quality, family-friendly programming accessible on a 24/7 network and across all screens,” Discovery said. “Stay tuned…working out the final details...more to come soon!”

Discovery previously formed a network in a joint venture with Oprah Winfrey, converting the former Discovery Health channel. It took several years before the network gained traction and started making money. OWN is now majority owned by Discovery.

Fixer Upper had its debut on HGTV in 2013. Season five premiered in November 2017 and ended in April 2018. HGTV launched a spinoff for Joanna Gaines called Fixer Upper: Behind the Design. That show premiered in April.

HGTV was part of Scripps Networks Interactive, which was acquired by Discovery earlier this year.

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: November 11, 2018, 2:47 am
Comcast has agreed to offer Bounce’s subscription streaming service Brown Sugar to Xfinity cable subscribers via its X1 system. The over the top service costs $3.99 a month and features a collection of African-American movies and on-demand access to Bounce’s original series and boxing events. X1 ...

Subscribers get African-American movies for $3.99 a month

Comcast has agreed to offer Bounce’s subscription streaming service Brown Sugar to Xfinity cable subscribers via its X1 system.

The over the top service costs $3.99 a month and features a collection of African-American movies and on-demand access to Bounce’s original series and boxing events.

X1 customers can sign up for a seven day free trial.

Related: Bounce Get Rights to Air ‘Scandal’ in Deal With Disney

X1 already offers streaming services like Netflix and YouTube to its subscribers and is in the process of adding Amazon Prime Video. Brown Sugar can be found in Xfinity on Demand’s Black Film & TV section under networks.

Brown Sugar is also available on Apple TV, Roku, Amazon Channels, Amazon Fire TV, Amazon Kindle, Android and Apple smartphones and tablets and web browsers via BrownSugar.com,

Bounce is part of the E.W. Scripps Co.

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: November 9, 2018, 10:09 pm
Available on connected TVs and set-top boxes (STBs), the Android TV operating system has become a critical component for delivering multiscreen video. Now that multicast ABR technology is able to solve scalability and latency issues, video delivery across all screens, including the main screen, can ...

Broadpeak® supports several major Android TV deployments in the APAC region. At the Android TV Summit, Broadpeak's CDN and streaming solutions will be demonstrated, showing support for the world-class Android TV operating system, including a demo of the operator-tier version of Android TV.

Available on connected TVs and set-top boxes (STBs), the Android TV operating system has become a critical component for delivering multiscreen video. Now that multicast ABR technology is able to solve scalability and latency issues, video delivery across all screens, including the main screen, can be addressed in ABR formats with an Android TV-based OS at the reception side.

Broadpeak® supports several major Android TV deployments in the APAC region. At the Android TV Summit, Broadpeak's CDN and streaming solutions will be demonstrated, showing support for the world-class Android TV operating system, including a demo of the operator-tier version of Android TV.

 

Simply Deliver Cloud PVR Services on Android TV Devices 

At the Android TV Summit, Broadpeak will demonstrate how a leading communications operator is using its Cloud PVR solution on Android TV devices. By providing the operator with a simple, scalable, and flexible solution for delivering time-shifted TV services, Broadpeak's solution enables the operator's subscribers to launch multiple recordings on various channels simultaneously without any constraint on the available bandwidth or the number of tuners on the reception device. With Cloud PVR, service providers can deliver start-over and catch-up TV, as well as impulsive recording, using a shared or private copy model. The recorded content can be processed on the fly to be viewed on any device type.

Preserve the Quality of Satellite for OTT Service Delivery With Multicast ABR

Broadpeak's nanoCDN™ multicast ABR solution supports OTT delivery via satellite, a cutting-edge capability that will be demonstrated at the Android TV Summit on Android TV STBs connected to an OTT satellite receiver. Using Broadpeak's nanoCDN solution, operators can deliver a superior OTT experience while preserving the quality of traditional satellite distribution. Broadpeak's nanoCDN for satellite allows operators to provide live TV, VOD, and catch-up TV content. By leveraging storage available on the receiver, operators can further expand their offering to include advanced nonlinear services such as time-shifting or start-over TV for increased monetization. 

 

Deliver Ultra-Low Latency on All Screens With Multicast ABR

Low latency for multiscreen delivery is critical for live television. At the Android TV Summit, Broadpeak will demonstrate how the company's nanoCDN multicast ABR solution can be deployed easily on Android TV devices and leverages the Common Media File Format (CMAF) and chunked transfer encoding to decrease latency for OTT live streaming. A demo of nanoCDN will be shown, highlighting the successful commercial deployment of Broadpeak's multicast ABR solution on Android TVs by a tier-1 operator.

As the first provider of ABR multicast technology, Broadpeak is changing the face of live multiscreen video delivery. nanoCDN turns millions of broadband gateways, cable modems, Wi-Fi routers, and STBs into active components of an operator's content delivery infrastructure, dramatically improving scalability. Leveraging home networks, operators can cost-effectively manage the consumption peaks of live multiscreen services for millions of simultaneous viewers using only a few megabits per second from their network.

Company Overview:

About Broadpeak® (www.broadpeak.tv)

Broadpeak® designs and manufactures video delivery components for content providers and network service providers deploying IPTV, cable, OTT, and mobile services. Its portfolio of solutions and technologies powers the delivery of movies, television programming, and other video content over managed networks and the Internet for viewing on any type of device. The company's systems and services help operators increase market share and improve subscriber loyalty with superior quality of experience.

Broadpeak supports all of its customers worldwide, from simple installations to large delivery systems reaching capacities of several million of simultaneous streams. The company is headquartered in Cesson-Sevigne, France.

All trademarks appearing herein are the property of their respective owners.

Link to Word Doc: www.202comms.com/Broadpeak/181109Broadpeak.docx

Broadpeak® Android TV Summit Exhibitor Preview

Nov. 13-15

Bangkok

Exhibiting in Boardroom 1 

Image Downloads:

Photo Link: www.202comms.com/Broadpeak/Broadpeak-CloudPVR.jpg

Photo Caption: Broadpeak Cloud PVR Solution

Photo Link: www.202comms.com/Broadpeak/Broadpeak-CDNandTVEverywhere.jpg

Photo Caption: Broadpeak nanoCDN Multicast ABR Technology for Live Multiscreen Delivery

Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: November 9, 2018, 9:30 pm
Season six of The Blacklist premieres on NBC Friday, Jan. 4. A two-hour special marks the occasion. “Following the startling revelation that Raymond “Red” Reddington (James Spader) isn’t who he says he is, Elizabeth Keen (Megan Boone) is torn between the relationship she’s developed with the ...

James Spader drama starts off season six with a two-hour special episode

Season six of The Blacklist premieres on NBC Friday, Jan. 4. A two-hour special marks the occasion.

“Following the startling revelation that Raymond “Red” Reddington (James Spader) isn’t who he says he is, Elizabeth Keen (Megan Boone) is torn between the relationship she’s developed with the man assumed to be her father and her desire to get to the bottom of years of secrets and lies,” said NBC. “Meanwhile, Red leads Liz and the FBI to some of the most strange and dangerous criminals yet, growing his empire and eliminating rivals in the process. All throughout, Liz and Red engage in an uneasy cat-and-mouse game in which lines will be crossed and the truth will be revealed.”

The Blacklist averaged a 1.6 in adults 18-49 and 8.6 million total viewers in live-plus-seven-day Nielsen ratings.

Related: 'Brooklyn Nine-Nine' Premieres on NBC Jan. 10

Diego Klattenhoff, Harry Lennix, Amir Arison, Mozhan Marnò and Hisham Tawfiq are also in the cast.

The Blacklist is a production of Davis Entertainment in association with Sony Pictures Television and Universal Television. John Eisendrath, Jon Bokenkamp, John Davis, John Fox, James Spader, Lukas Reiter, J.R. Orci, Carla Kettner and Laura A. Benson are executive producers.

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: November 9, 2018, 9:29 pm
Season two of international intelligence drama Patriot returns to Amazon Prime Nov. 9. The new season sees U.S. intelligence officer John Tavner, who took cover as a middling employee at a Midwestern industrial piping firm in season one as he aimed to prevent Iran from going nuclear, lose his ...

Main character looking to disrupt Iran’s election

Season two of international intelligence drama Patriot returns to Amazon Prime Nov. 9. The new season sees U.S. intelligence officer John Tavner, who took cover as a middling employee at a Midwestern industrial piping firm in season one as he aimed to prevent Iran from going nuclear, lose his bag of 11 million euros. He continues to plot to influence Iran’s presidential election, which is as complicated as it sounds. The new order: the assassination of the pro-nukes candidate in a Paris compound.

Michael Dorman plays Tavner. Terry O’Quinn plays his father, also his operation’s chief, and Debra Winger his mother.

The whole of season two was shot in Paris. Steven Conrad created the series. He’s mostly a film guy, having worked on Wonder and The Secret Life of Walter Mitty. He aims to shoot Patriot like a long, recurring film. “It’s not so much a TV show but a movie that comes to you all at once, every 18 months,” Conrad said.

Related: 'Marvelous Mrs. Maisel' Season Two on Amazon Dec. 5

Paris was a “remarkable” setting, he said. “We hope to be able to stay there.”

Conrad aimed to depict the real Paris, dark sides and all, in the show. “We don’t shoot the Eiffel Tower,” he said.

He was a stickler for natural light, which likely made the shooting process last a bunch longer. But he felt it’s worth it. “We tried to be cinematic in the TV process,” Conrad said.

You may recall the movie The Patriot, which had Mel Gibson as a South Carolina farmer forced to fight the British in the Revolutionary War. Conrad said searching for Patriot on Amazon would bring up The Patriot first, and a New England Patriots spatula next. (Searching for “Patriot” on Amazon today has Patriot ahead of The Patriot and the spatula, but behind a 12-pack of Patriotic Golf Balls, $29.99.)

Still, Conrad gives Amazon high marks for its partnership. “They hired us to make something distinctive, then they got behind us to do that,” he said. “It works—it’s a pretty functional relationship.”

Conrad executive produces, writes and directs Patriot. The other exec producers are James Parriott, Glenn Ficarra, John Requa, Charles Gogolak and Gil Bellows.

Reviews for the new season are quite positive. The Hollywood Reporter said, “Arguably the best drama you're not watching, or haven't even discovered, Amazon's gem returns for more existential spy action, laughs and folk songs.”

Uproxx noted Patriot’s mix of fun and weirdness. “It is so strange. Not just the plot, which I’ve barely skimmed so far. The whole tone and style of it. It’s darker than a lot of bleak dramas but also funnier than a lot of goofball comedies. It moves painfully slow in places, on purpose, often for comedic effect, and then slams the gas and whips the action around at 120 mph through hairpin turns and crowded intersections. Creator Steve Conrad has given the show a wholly original vibe.”

Fittingly, Conrad could not name another TV series or a film that he would consider an influence on Patriot. “It’s really its own thing,” he said. “We want Patriot to be something different.”

He had an easier time comparing the series to record albums. The one Patriot is most like? “Beggar’s Banquet,” the Rolling Stones’ 1968 masterpiece that gave the world “Sympathy for the Devil” and “Street Fighting Man.”

“It’s a ride,” Conrad explained. “You go different places.”

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: November 9, 2018, 9:20 pm
PBS documentary series Nova premieres the film Thai Cave Rescue Wednesday, Nov. 14, depicting the 12 boys and their soccer coach who were stranded in a Thailand cave in June and July. The boys and their coach entered the cave after soccer practice. Heavy rains flooded the cave and they were trapped ...

Film looks at the dozen boys and their soccer coach who were stuck in scary spot

PBS documentary series Nova premieres the film Thai Cave Rescue Wednesday, Nov. 14, depicting the 12 boys and their soccer coach who were stranded in a Thailand cave in June and July. The boys and their coach entered the cave after soccer practice. Heavy rains flooded the cave and they were trapped inside.

“Follow the harrowing operation and discover the scientific ingenuity that made the rescue possible. Hear how rescuers explored every option, from pumping out water, to drilling a new exit, to ultimately cave-diving with the children through the treacherous, flooded passages,” said Nova.

Tom Stubberfield is the project's writer/producer/director out of Atlantic Productions in the U.K. Chris Schmidt is the executive producer for Nova

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: November 9, 2018, 6:38 pm
Big computer companies and edge providers are in agreement that federal privacy legislation currently being contemplated by the White House and Congress should preempt state efforts to regulate privacy. They also advise the Trump Administration and Congress not to be in too much of a hurry to give ...

Say 'appropriate' preemption is warranted; computer cos. also raise doubts about need for FTC rulemaking authority

Big computer companies and edge providers are in agreement that federal privacy legislation currently being contemplated by the White House and Congress should preempt state efforts to regulate privacy. They also advise the Trump Administration and Congress not to be in too much of a hurry to give the FTC rulemaking authority.

The Internet Association (IA) and Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) made those points in filings with the National Telecommunications & Information Administration (NTIA), which sought comment on a framework for protecting privacy. NTIA is President Trump's principal communications advisory agency. Comments were due Friday (Nov. 9).

NTIA is looking to come up with "a set of user-centric privacy outcomes that underpin the protections that should be produced by any Federal actions on consumer-privacy policy, and a set of high-level goals that describe the outlines of the ecosystem that should be created to provide those protections." That language signals the Trump Administration is not looking to come up with suggestions for prescriptive regulations in that space, which is not surprising given the President's emphasis on getting rid of regulations rather than creating new ones.

In June, California passed a privacy bill that established a consumer right of privacy, though one based on disclosure and the right to opt out of data collection or third-party sharing, and to have their data deleted if they chose. The bill, which does not go into effect until 2020, followed congressional Republican's nullification of an online privacy framework approved by the FCC under then-Democratic Chairman Tom Weeeler. Other states are making similar efforts to fill what they see as a privacy void, which edge providers and ISPs oppose as a "patchwork" approach that is hard to comply with.

Related: Amazon Slams Calif. Privacy Bill 

In its comments, CCIA said that "where appropriate" state laws on data privacy, breach notification and security should be preempted by an overarching federal baseline privacy protection. IA said: "A national privacy framework should be consistent throughout all states, preempting state consumer privacy and data security laws."

The companies also want NTIA to come up with its framework ASAP since congress is on a parallel track in its efforts to come up with the legislation to create that framework, though getting a divided Congress to agree on issues like what is personal information, where and whether there should be an opt-in requirement for data sharing, and the sticky preemption issue, will make that a tall order. 

Some privacy activists and Hill Dems argue that preemption should not occur where the state laws are tougher than a national standard. 

Those same activists have been pushing for any new federal privacy legislation to give the Federal Trade Commission, which has principle authority over enforcing online privacy, both from edge providers and ISPs, the ability to come up with rules and levy penalties. Currently it enforces privacy by seeking settlements—financial and otherwise—or suing companies for deceptive or anticompetitive conduct.

But the Internet Association says not so fast: "The FTC has said that it believes that it needs APA rulemaking authority and civil penalty authority as part of a new federal law," it told NTIA. "IA believes that it is premature to conclude that rulemaking and civil penalty authority is necessary for a law that has yet to be drafted, let alone enacted."

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: November 9, 2018, 6:37 pm
Fox won Thursday’s prime derby with Thursday Night Football, Steelers versus Panthers, leading Fox to a 3.3 in viewers 18-49, per the Nielsen overnight ratings, and a 14 share. That easily beat the 1.2/5 that CBS put up. A blowout for the Pittsburgh squad, Steelers-Panthers took up all of Fox’s ...

Strong night for broadcast nets; CBS in particular shows growth

Fox won Thursday’s prime derby with Thursday Night Football, Steelers versus Panthers, leading Fox to a 3.3 in viewers 18-49, per the Nielsen overnight ratings, and a 14 share. That easily beat the 1.2/5 that CBS put up.

A blowout for the Pittsburgh squad, Steelers-Panthers took up all of Fox’s prime. The telecast grew 57% from last Thursday’s game, Niners versus Raiders, also a blowout.

CBS had Big Bang Theory up 10% at 2.3 and Young Sheldon grew 6% to 1.8, then Mom ticked up 9% to 1.2 and Murphy Brown was a flat 0.8. SWAT increased 14% to 0.8.

Related: How Some of TV’s Top Comedy Series Compare

ABC did a 1.1/5, as Grey’s Anatomy rated a 1.6 and Station 19 a 1.0, both up a tenth of a point, before How to Get Away With Murder dropped 13% to 0.7.

NBC was at 0.8/4. Superstore was up 13% at 0.9 and The Good Place north 14% for a 0.8. A rerun of The Voice did a 0.7 before Law & Order: SVU rated a flat 0.9.

Telemundo and Univision both scored a 0.4/2.

The CW was at 0.3/1 with Supernatural and Legacies both down a tenth of a point at 0.3. 

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: November 9, 2018, 5:30 pm
Season two of the anthology series Room 104 premieres on HBO Nov. 9, airing at 11:30 p.m. Mark and Jay Duplass created the series, about a single room of a cheesy chain motel, and the stories that take place in the room. The premiere episode sees a trio of young adults renting the room to ...

‘Room 104’ starts season two on HBO Nov. 9

Season two of the anthology series Room 104 premieres on HBO Nov. 9, airing at 11:30 p.m. Mark and Jay Duplass created the series, about a single room of a cheesy chain motel, and the stories that take place in the room.

The premiere episode sees a trio of young adults renting the room to celebrate the birthday of one of them. The birthday girl’s older sister, with whom she does not enjoy spending time, was not invited, but catches wind of the celebration and turns up in room 104. Big sister is very creepy. It does not go well.

The cast for season two includes Mahershala Ali, Judy Greer and Rainn Wilson.

Related: 'True Detective' Starts on HBO Jan. 13

Executive producer Sydney Fleischmann, who got her start as Mark Duplass’s assistant on HBO comedy Togetherness, said season two goes for some new things.

“We step it up and take some risks,” she said. “We try some weird, interesting things.”

She suggests Room 104’s anthological nature is something of a break from the highly binge-able dramas it competes with for viewers’ attention. “The viewer can pop in and out each week,” she said. “They don’t feel obligated the way they do with serialized shows. Every episode is different.”

Season two’s episodes incorporate drama, musical and sci fi, she said. “It runs the gamut. We get to play in different spaces.”

Besides the Duplass brothers and Fleischmann, the exec producers are Mel Eslyn and Xan Aranda.

HBO shows two episodes on premiere night Friday.

Asked about her favorite episode of the new season, Fleischmann is hesitant to pick one out, but said “Josie & Me” struck a chord with her. It’s about a woman in her late 20s who has a conversation with herself in college, about something that happened at a fraternity party. “In a way, it’s a big story, but also an intimate story,” said Fleischmann. “It’s different from anything I’ve seen in a long time. But they’re all fun and different.”

Fleischmann said of the musical episode, called “Arnold,” “I can’t wait for people to get those songs stuck in their heads.”

Other work from the Duplass brothers includes HBO’s animated series Animals and the Netflix documentaries Wild Wild Country and Evil Genius: The True Story of America’s Most Diabolical Bank Heist. Fleischmann said the brothers bring different voices to their work, and “flex different muscles” from each other on the set.

Animals was recently canceled after three seasons. Fleischmann hopes Room 104 will continue for a good, long while. “We keep reinventing ourselves,” she said. The array of characters and storylines available to an anthological series is “creatively freeing,” noted Fleischmann.

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: November 9, 2018, 5:03 pm
Gunpowder & Sky, the studio started by former MTV executive Van Toffler, is working with Robin Williams’ daughter Zelda Williams to develop her short film Shrimp into a weekly half hour show. The studio said it is talking with premium TV channels and SVOD services about airing the series. The ...

Studio talking to premium TV and SVOD services

Gunpowder & Sky, the studio started by former MTV executive Van Toffler, is working with Robin Williams’ daughter Zelda Williams to develop her short film Shrimp into a weekly half hour show.

A scene from 'Shrimp'

The studio said it is talking with premium TV channels and SVOD services about airing the series.

The TV version stars Williams, who is also writing, directing and producing. It focuses on the lives of women who work as professional dominants in a Los Angeles BDSM den.

“We were really drawn to Shrimp because Zelda was able to take a generally taboo topic, turn it on its head and tap into the day-to-day happenings of the dominatrix community and tell their story in an authentic way,” said Toffler, CEO of the studio. “At Gunpowder & Sky, we’re constantly looking for ways to support new filmmakers who push the envelope to tell great stories, and we are particularly proud of this strong female-driven story that Zelda unleashes to the world.”

A scene from 'Shrimp'

Shrimp also stars Conor Leslie, Paulina Singer, Frances Fisher, Jake Abel, Jacob Zachar, and Danielle Campbell

“When I embarked on creating Shrimp a couple years ago, I never could’ve imagined where this journey would take me, or the wonderful people I’d come to know along the way,” said Williams. “I’m truly ecstatic to have the opportunity to shine a more positive, honest light on this community than has previously been afforded it by Hollywood, especially as their mastery of consent is something I think many people right now could learn from. This project has been a labor of love to bring to the screen ever since I shadowed in a den to write it, and I’m so excited to partner with Gunpowder & Sky to expand on this universe and hopefully bring it to life!”

Gunpowder & Sky also recently announced getting the domestic rights to Alex Ross Perry’s punk epic Her Smell, starring Elisabeth Moss.

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: November 9, 2018, 5:01 pm
Author: B&C Staff
Posted: November 9, 2018, 3:44 pm
The E.W. Scripps Co. swung to a third quarter profit as revenues were boosted by local political ad sales revenue from Katz Broadcasting, acquired a year ago. Income from continuing operations was $20 million, or 24 cents per share, compared to a loss of $27.6 million, or 34 cents per share. ...

Revenue at Katz Broadcasting up 23%

The E.W. Scripps Co. swung to a third quarter profit as revenues were boosted by local political ad sales revenue from Katz Broadcasting, acquired a year ago.

Income from continuing operations was $20 million, or 24 cents per share, compared to a loss of $27.6 million, or 34 cents per share.

Revenue rose 51% to $303 million.

Political advertising this year totaled $140 million, up 86% from the previous midterm election cycle.

Related: Scripps to Acquire 15 Stations from Cordillera

Profit for Scripps’ Local Media segment doubled to $67.4 million from $30.4 million a year ago.

Local Media revenue was up 23% to $231 million. Retrans revenue rose 24% to $78.8 million. Ad sales were up 25% to $40 million, though the wave of political advertising displaced other advertisers resulting in a 7.5% decline in core advertising.

National Media profits was $2.8 million, compared to a loss of $4.4 million a year ago.

Revenue from national media were $71.8 million, up from $12.5 million.

Revenue from the Katz Networks, part of national media acquired late last year, was $46.5 million, up 23% in the quarter from a year ago, driven by audience delivery growth, rising ad rates and expanded distribution.

Excluding Katz, National Media revenue doubled.

“During a quarter when we delivered terrific operating results across the board – buoyed by record-level mid-term election political revenue, we also took significant action to execute our plan to reposition the company for improved operating performance and long-term growth,” said CEO Adam Symson.

“The acquisitions of the Cordillera television portfolio and Triton, the digital audio SaaS infrastructure and measurement leader, are important moves to enhance the company’s cash-flow production and long-term value,” Symson said. “These acquisitions, alongside our consistent operating performance and disciplined approach to return of capital through the share repurchase plan and dividend, should give shareholders confidence that we are executing in a way that delivers them the results they seek.”

For the fourth quarter, Scripps said it expects local media revenue to be up in the 30% ranges and national media revenue to be in the low to mid $70 million range. 

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: November 9, 2018, 3:30 pm
Tribune Media, recovering from the aborted takeover by Sinclair Broadcast Group, swung to a profit in the third quarter on big increases in political advertising and retransmission consent payments. Net income was $54.1 million, or 61 cents a share, compared to a loss of $18.7 million a year ago. ...

Political ad revenue up 90%

Tribune Media, recovering from the aborted takeover by Sinclair Broadcast Group, swung to a profit in the third quarter on big increases in political advertising and retransmission consent payments.

Net income was $54.1 million, or 61 cents a share, compared to a loss of $18.7 million a year ago.

Revenues rose 11% to $498 million.

Related: Sony, Tribune to Debut Mel Robbins Talker in Fall 2019

Political advertising revenues hit $42.6, up 90% from the previous quarter during a midterm election. Revenues were up 36% from the third quarter of 2016.

Operating profit for Tribune Media’s Television and Entertainment segment grew to $67.3 million compared to a loss of $1.4 million a year ago.

TV and entertainment advertising revenues increased 11% to $327.2 million. Retransmission revenues rose 12% to $116.6 million, Carriage fee revenues rose 30% to $40.1 million.

“We are very pleased with our record third quarter revenue and Adjusted EBITDA which reflect the strong operational year we are having,” said CEO Peter Kern.

“We drove share gains in political and core advertising along with reaping the benefits of unprecedented political spending and stronger core advertising in our markets. Net of displacement, we estimate core advertising growth would have been in positive territory for the quarter, which is a significant improvement compared to the first half of the year,” Kern said. “This robust advertising performance along with continued growth in retransmission and carriage fees and diligent focus on costs produced a terrific third quarter. We are proud of the work our teams have done during this time, and we look forward to a strong finish to the year.”

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: November 9, 2018, 2:43 pm
With E!’s first presentation of the People’s Choice Awards Sunday night, NBCUniversal is making changes in the show to encourage more fan involvement and help sponsors connect with those fans. Advertisers eBay, Subaru, Metro by T-Mobile and Zales have signed up for integrated sponsorships during ...

eBay, Subaru, Metro by T-Mobile, Zales Integrated into awards show

With E!’s first presentation of the People’s Choice Awards Sunday night, NBCUniversal is making changes in the show to encourage more fan involvement and help sponsors connect with those fans.

Advertisers eBay, Subaru, Metro by T-Mobile and Zales have signed up for integrated sponsorships during the Red Carpet and the Awards telecast.

E!, known for its award-show red-carpet coverage of arriving celebrities, will exclusively air E! Live From the Red Carpet from 7 p.m. to 9 p.,m. ET/PT. The telecast will be enhanced with People's Choice awards being presented on the Red Carpet.

Related: Tang Gets Additional Duties At NBCU Lifestyle Networks

Instead of putting its cameras away following the red carpet as it usually does, E! will continue with the People’s Choice Awards ceremony itself, which will be simulcast by NBCU’s other cable networks USA, Syfy, Bravo and Universo.

The award show will be followed by a live edition of E!’s new talk show Busy Tonight, featuring Busy Philipps, who will have Tina Fey as her guest.

'Busy Tonight's' Busy Philipps

The network is looking to make this awards show more E! centric.

Related: NBCU Shifts to In-House Ad Optimization Capability

“One of our ambitions was to build on the equity of the People’s Choice Awards, but to really re-imagine this in a new way for our audience and to make a virtue of the fans, because this is the only awards show that’s voted on by the people,” said Jen Neal, executive VP, marketing and executive producer, live events for E!. You’ll see fan engagement and active fans in a new way with a broadcast on E!.”

The show will be more intimate with some surprise moments. It is also designed to celebrate all of the year’s moments in pop culture, Neal said.

The awards will be presented in a new venue, Barker Hangar. “The space gives us a blank canvas to work with,” Neal said.

The show will also take advantage of E!’s digital platforms and social media via Twitter, Facebook and Twitter.

NBCU has been pushing advertising innovations to hold onto viewers, who are increasingly choosing to watch in ad-free environments. It has built special executions for some People’s Choice sponsors.

“NBCUniversal is laser-focused on improving the consumer experience in our programming, it makes the viewing more enjoyable and improves the effectiveness of the ads for our clients, a win-win for all involved,” said Laura Molen, president, advertising sales and partnerships, NBCUniversal. “We’re excited to create opportunities with brand moments that reach consumers at every touchpoint – from picture-in-picture, social polls, network crossovers and content in commercial time - for this impressive roster of brands and align with their campaign goals in unique ways.”

“We worked really closely with our ad sales partners,” Neal added. "We had conversations early on to make sure there were unique experiences that help the show and drive engagement with their brands.”

With the special integrations, the ad load for the People Choice Awards is expected to be lower than most other award shows.

For eBay, E! talent will give audiences a sneak peek at what’s going on backstage and the online retailer will break two hot deals, contextually aligned to the show, during commercial breaks. eBay also engaged E! sister network Telemundo for additional campaign elements.

“Inspired by what’s happening around them, shoppers turn to eBay to find the latest in pop culture, fashion and entertainment,” said Suzy Deering, chief marketing officer for eBay Americas and global brand lead. “By teaming up with E!, we look forward to offering their viewers instantly shoppable experiences during the People’s Choice Awards, connecting them with inventory on our platform, from the latest trending items to hard-to-find styles.”

Metro by T-Mobile will bring E! fans beyond the Red Carpet and on the awards stage with a sponsored musical performance from pop star, Rita Ora, who will perform a song from her debut U.S. album Phoenix, dropping Nov. 23. The sponsored performance will be live streamed on Snapchat's Discover page, the first live musical performance on the platform.

Subaru will use its presence in E!’s Live from the Red Carpet to promote the all-new 3-row Subaru Ascent. The automaker will place the SUV on the red carpet and have exclusive sponsorship of the arrival cam. To give viewers more access to celebrities on the red carpet, Subaru will feature brand messaging via picture-in-picture advertising.

“At Subaru of America, we are always looking for unique opportunities to capture the attention of the consumer, particularly when we are launching new vehicles like the Subaru Ascent,” said Jack Kelly, national integrated media manager at Subaru of America. “We partnered with the People’s Choice Awards and E! Entertainment to leverage unique advertising formats, such as P-I-P, to enhance the consumer’s viewing experience while making a positive brand impact.”

Zales will work with E!, employing network talent, for the multiplatform “Be Our Stylist” campaign. Fans will vote on which Zales’ jewelry pieces E! talent will wear the evening of the show, leading up to a red carpet reveal that night.

After the Busy Tonight show following the Awards Show, E! News will be covering the winners.

When the long evening is over E! Will be having an afterparty. “That will not be on television,” Neal said.

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: November 9, 2018, 2:30 pm
MythBusters Jr. debuts on Science Channel Jan. 2. Adam Savage, original Mythbusters host, hosts the Jr. program. He’s an executive producer as well. Science Channel is on for 10 episodes. Savage will team up with six young "makers"—robotics experts, builders and inventors, all under the age of 16. ...

Adam Savage hosts and executive produces

MythBusters Jr. debuts on Science Channel Jan. 2. Adam Savage, original Mythbusters host, hosts the Jr. program. He’s an executive producer as well. Science Channel is on for 10 episodes.

Savage will team up with six young "makers"—robotics experts, builders and inventors, all under the age of 16. The crew will tackle myths similar to those seen on MythBusters, which ran from 2003 to 2016 on Discovery, and then started on Science in 2017.

“From building a fire extinguisher jetpack, to dominos big enough to crush a car, and testing myths from the Oscar-winning big screen pic Gravity and TV’s Breaking Bad, it’s an action-packed season,” said Science Channel.

The premiere episode features Duct Tape. The junior MythBusters explore whether you can make a functioning parachute and a serviceable car tire from Duct Tape.

“These junior MythBusters are amazing. And while they’re kids, the myths we take on are as full-sized and as explosive as ever!” said Savage. “We’ve created an incredible 10-episode season in which these new MythBusters put their remarkable intelligence and creativity to the test.”

The junior MythBusters are: Valerie Castillo (15), a builder and robotics wiz from Lancaster, Calif.; Elijah Horland (12), a self-taught electronics maker, programmer and circuit wiz from Brooklyn, New York; Cannan Huey-You (12), a college sophomore studying astrophysics at Texas Christian University; Jesse Lawless (15), a builder of custom hot rods from Slidell, Louisiana; Rachel Pizzolato (14), a three-time New Orleans Science Fair champion from Metairie, Louisiana; and Allie Weber (13), a maker, builder and inventor from South Dakota.

Also featured in MythBusters Jr. are design and engineering experts Tamara Robertson and Jon Marcu.

MythBusters Jr. is produced for Science Channel by Beyond Productions. John Luscombe and John Tessier are executive producers for Beyond. Wyatt Channell is executive producer for Science Channel.

Science Channel is part of Discovery, Inc. 

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: November 9, 2018, 1:37 pm
CNN said that as of Thursday night (Nov. 8), senior White House correspondent Jim Acosta's revoked press pass had still not been reinstated by the White House. It was unclear what the duration of his ouster would be after the White House claimed he had manhandled an intern in retaining the mic and ...

But is following President to Paris

CNN said that as of Thursday night (Nov. 8), senior White House correspondent Jim Acosta's revoked press pass had still not been reinstated by the White House.

It was unclear what the duration of his ouster would be after the White House claimed he had manhandled an intern in retaining the mic and pressing the President in a press conference.

Related: CNN Says Trump Has Gone Too Far

White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders had tweeted a video of the exchange between Costa, the President, and an intern trying to take away Acosta's mic, to demonstrate how Acosta had manhandled her, but AP had an analyst look at the tweeted video (as did other news organizations) and he said it appeared to have been manipulated to make Acosta seem more aggressive.

Acosta is not simply cooling his heels, however, CNN pointed out that he reported Thursday that Labor Secretary Alex Acosta (no relation) was being considered for the vacant attorney general post—following Jeff Session's post-election ouster. Jim Acosta is also traveling to Paris to cover the President's trip there.

CNN says it is working "behind the scenes" to get Acosta's hard pass to the White House grounds restored. 

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: November 9, 2018, 12:54 pm
After plying a $5-a-month price increase to its best-selling “Orange” tier over the summer, Sling TV had its slowest growth quarter in its nearly four-year history in Q3, adding just 26,000 users. The metric compares most unfavorably to the 240,000 users the virtual MVPD added in the third quarter ...

Virtual pay TV service has its slowest quarter ever after $5-a-month price increase

After plying a $5-a-month price increase to its best-selling “Orange” tier over the summer, Sling TV had its slowest growth quarter in its nearly four-year history in Q3, adding just 26,000 users.

The metric compares most unfavorably to the 240,000 users the virtual MVPD added in the third quarter of 2017. Sling TV added just 41,000 users in the second quarter.

Related: Dish 3rd Quarter Profits Rise Despite Drop in Revenue

The platform’s growth deceleration comes at an inopportune time for parent company Dish Network, which saw attrition to its core satellite TV platform reach a record high 367,000 in Q3.

“I think one of the phenomenons you're seeing is I don't think that OTT business is slowing down,” said Dish Chairman Charlie Ergen during Dish’s third-quarter earnings call.

Author: Daniel Frankel
Posted: November 9, 2018, 1:04 am
Tennis Channel will launch a new countdown show that highlights several tennis-themed categories, the network said Thursday. The original series, The Ten, launches Nov. 11 and highlights a different debate-spurring list each week, according to network officials. The eight-episode series will be ...

‘The Ten’ premieres Nov. 11

Tennis Channel will launch a new countdown show that highlights several tennis-themed categories, the network said Thursday.

The original series, The Ten, launches Nov. 11 and highlights a different debate-spurring list each week, according to network officials. The eight-episode series will be hosted by Jason Biggs (American Pie, Orange Is the New Black) and will launch with a countdown of the top 10 men’s tennis players of all time.

"The Ten brings the never-ending debates from sports bars, tennis courts and living rooms to Tennis Channel," said John MacDonald, senior VP, programming. "We're excited to give fans the opportunity to rank their favorites against Tennis Channel in this new multiplatform series."

Author: R. Thomas Umstead
Posted: November 9, 2018, 12:55 am
Once The Walt Disney Co. gets control of Hulu, it intends to ramp up programming and possibly increase subscription prices. On Disney’s earnings call with analysts, CEO Bob Iger stressed that direct-to-consumer products will be a big priority for the company. Last year, Disney launched ESPN+, which ...

DTC will cost Disney $100M in 1Q

Once The Walt Disney Co. gets control of Hulu, it intends to ramp up programming and possibly increase subscription prices.

On Disney’s earnings call with analysts, CEO Bob Iger stressed that direct-to-consumer products will be a big priority for the company.

Last year, Disney launched ESPN+, which now has more than a million subscribers, it plans to launch the newly named Disney+ late next year and when it closed its acquisition of assets from 21st Century Fox, it will own 60% of Hulu. (Iger said that transaction appears likely to close sooner than expected.)

Related: Disney Earnings Jump Despite Cable Network Unit Decline

Disney CFO Christine McCarthy told analysts that investment in direct-to-consumer will cost the company $100 million in earnings in the fiscal first quarter.

In response to a question, Iger said that Disney intended to increase investment in Hulu, “notably on the programming side.”

He said that he expected the greater TV production capability the company will have after it absorbs Fox’s studio assets will fuel Hulu with additional programming.

Related: European Commission Clears Disney-Fox With Some Conditions

Between FX, Fox Searchlight, ABC and Freeform, "we think we have an opportunity if we create the TV studio we aim to create . . . we're going to have an engine at the company that will be able to supply a Hulu with a lot of high-quality content, that is the goal," Iger said.

Hulu will focus more on “general entertainment” while Disney+ focuses on family fare, he said.

Iger said that there appeared to be some elasticity in the pricing of Hulu, so there may be an “opportunity to increase pricing there.”

Iger said that Hulu has attractive demographics, with viewers of off-network shows on Hulu averaging about 20 years younger than than when they first air on broadcast.

Those younger demographics, combined with Hulu’s ability to target individual subscribers, gives it an attractive advertising proposition that he called underappreciated.

Hulu losses rose to more than $300 million in the quarter, according to reports from Disney's partners.

Disney will give investors and analysts a first look at the Disney+ interface at an investor conference in April.

Iger laid out some of the programming the company will be creating for Disney+ under the Disney, Pixar, Marvel, Star Wars and National Geographic banners.

“There will be a constant pipeline of exclusive new content,” he said.

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: November 8, 2018, 10:16 pm
CAMBRIDGE, Ontario — Nov. 8, 2018 — Bannister Lake is pleased to announce that it is partnering with Montreal-based broadcast design firm Motion Path to provide complete data visualization solutions for the broadcast and visual communications industry. Bannister Lake's powerful data management ...

Collaboration Links Best-In-Class Data Aggregation and Management Software With Award-Winning Real-Time Broadcast Design

CAMBRIDGE, Ontario — Nov. 8, 2018 — Bannister Lake is pleased to announce that it is partnering with Montreal-based broadcast design firm Motion Path to provide complete data visualization solutions for the broadcast and visual communications industry. Bannister Lake's powerful data management software, custom development solutions, and implementation expertise combined with Motion Path's award-winning graphic design capabilities creates exciting new storytelling efficiencies and possibilities for news and sports producers, station groups, event producers, and digital signage networks.

Bannister Lake provides broadcasters with the industry's most powerful automated live data management engine, allowing a wide variety of data formats to be parsed, edited, moderated, and strategically distributed. Data appears on-air in the form of tickers, sports bugs, full frame graphics, and branding elements. Motion Path has carved a unique niche in the broadcast and digital signage industries by providing graphic design services especially created for live data environments. By combining the two, Bannister Lake driven data will populate Motion Path graphics, delivering a powerful amalgamation of outstanding engineering, innovative production workflows, and compelling design.

"Having a strong international design partner like Motion Path helps us add value and efficiency to clients who are seeking a flexible and powerful way to populate graphics with live data from any source," said Georg Hentsch, president of Bannister Lake. "We had an excellent experience working together recently on the Ontario election with TFO and we look forward to working on many more data-rich projects together."

"Bannister Lake's data solutions will give our clients a straightforward way to manage complex data sets that will integrate beautifully into our designs," said Anton Maximovsky, president of Motion Path. "Very often, data management was something our clients struggled with, needing to custom build a solution or had to compromise their expectations. By linking our graphics to Bannister Lake's solutions, we have opened up many more creative possibilities for our clients."

Both Bannister Lake and Motion Path are veteran election specialists and have provided broadcast clients with election race software systems and election graphics packages, respectively. Today's partnership announcement will strengthen both companies' election offerings and provide a complete end-to-end solution for election producers. The partnership also helps power Motion Path's breakthrough work in virtual reality and augmented reality by incorporating Bannister Lake's data tools to drive on-air presentations. Beyond elections, both companies look forward to providing innovative real-time visualization solutions for sports, financial news, events, eSports, and digital signage.

For more information about Bannister Lake's partnership with Motion Path and Bannister Lake's solutions, please contact Vern Freedlander, strategic partnerships.

# # #

About Motion Path Inc.

Motion Path is a creative services provider with the emphasis on real-time 3D graphics for broadcast television. The team comprised of seasoned industry professionals from the broadcast world who have delivered some of the highest profile productions in television including packages for the Super Bowl; the World Series; US Presidential elections; and newscasts for ABC, NBC, CNN, CNBC, ESPN, FOX News, FOX SPORTS, and many others. The team has also won a number of prestigious design awards for work on design projects in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. More information is available at www.motion-path.com.

About Bannister Lake

Bannister Lake is a leading provider of professional video graphic display solutions for broadcast television, cable, satellite, audio/visual and information presentation applications, eSports, and digital signage worldwide. Our solutions integrate seamlessly with existing infrastructures while automating the integration and display of external data sources, improving the productivity of any organization. Visit us online at www.bannisterlake.com.

All trademarks and registered trademarks mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners.

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Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: November 8, 2018, 10:05 pm
The Walt Disney Co. reported higher fourth quarter earnings on huge gains at its studio entertainment business, overcoming a decline at its cable networks. Net income rose 33% to $2.32 billion, $1.55 a share, from $1.75 billion $1.13 a share, a year ago. Revenue rose 12% to $14.3 billion. Related: ...

ESPN income flat

The Walt Disney Co. reported higher fourth quarter earnings on huge gains at its studio entertainment business, overcoming a decline at its cable networks.

Net income rose 33% to $2.32 billion, $1.55 a share, from $1.75 billion $1.13 a share, a year ago.

Revenue rose 12% to $14.3 billion.

Related: Iger Sees More Investment After Gaining Hulu Control

Operating income for Disney’s cable networks business was down 6% to $1.159 billion as revenue rose 5% to $4.1 billion. The decline was caused by the consolidation of BAMTech, which had an operating loss.

Disney Channel and Freeform had increases in operating income, the company said.

ESPN was flat as affiliate revenue growth was offset by higher programming and production costs and 5% lower ad revenue.

Related: European Commission Clears Disney-Fox With Some Conditions

Broadcasting operating income jumped 66% to $379 million as revenues rose 21% to $1.833 billion. Increased program sales and affiliate revenue growth drive the gains. Two Marvel series and black-ish were sold during the quarter.

Bob Iger

Disney had $10 million lost on its investments in Hulu and A+E Networks. July’s losses were higher than a year ago and income at A+E was lower. Hulu had higher programming, marketing and labor costs. At A+E, programming costs were up and ad revenue was down.

Studio entertainment got a boost from the releases of Incredibles 2 and Ant-Man and the Wasp.

“We’re very pleased with our financial performance in fiscal 2018, delivering record revenue, net income and earnings per share,” said CEO Bob Iger. “We remain focused on the successful completion and integration of our 21st Century Fox acquisition and the further development of our direct-to-consumer business, including the highly anticipated launch of our Disney-branded streaming service late next year.”

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: November 8, 2018, 9:30 pm
The CW has ordered additional episodes for its three rookie series. The order includes nine more episodes of Charmed, and three apiece for All American and Legacies. Charmed will finish its first season with 22 episodes, while All American and Legacies will have 16 apiece. High school football ...

‘Charmed’, ‘All American’, ‘Legacies’ extend their first seasons

The CW has ordered additional episodes for its three rookie series. The order includes nine more episodes of Charmed, and three apiece for All American and Legacies.

Charmed will finish its first season with 22 episodes, while All American and Legacies will have 16 apiece.

High school football drama All American debuted October 10, rebooted witch drama Charmed premiered October 14 ,and Legacies, set in the world of The Vampire Diaries and The Originals, October 25.

The CW will premiere Roswell, New Mexico and In the Dark in the mid-season, along with the season premieres of Jane the Virgin, iZombie and The 100. It will be the final seasons for Jane and iZombie.  

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: November 8, 2018, 8:47 pm
Comcast-NBCU has made it clear it has major problems with satellite operators' "market-based" proposal to redistribute C-Band spectrum the FCC is trying to repurpose for 5G, suggesting the FCC would be putting the Fox in charge of the hen house. The C-Band Alliance, comprising fixed satellite ...

Told FCC that satellite operator approach is not equitable solution

Comcast-NBCU has made it clear it has major problems with satellite operators' "market-based" proposal to redistribute C-Band spectrum the FCC is trying to repurpose for 5G, suggesting the FCC would be putting the Fox in charge of the hen house.

The C-Band Alliance, comprising fixed satellite service operators, said last week that its proposal to negotiate secondary-market agreements for up to 200 MHz of C-band spectrum, is the win-win solution the FCC is looking for.

Comcast-NBCU begs to differ, or at least it has major issues, something it made clear in its language about the proposal in comments to the FCC.

The FCC in July voted unanimously to find ways to open up the C-band spectrum (3.7-4.2 Ghz) for terrestrial wireless use, either all of the 500 MHz or some portion of it, and through either an incentive or capacity auction, a market mechanism where incumbents voluntarily strike deals to reduce their footprint, or some other means.

The C-band is currently used for satellite delivery of cable and broadcast network programming to TV and radio stations, satellite radio services, and cable head-ends. The FCC wants to open it up to wireless broadband to help close the digital divide and promote 5G, both prime directives for the commission.

Comcast told the FCC, flatly, that no one has proposed an equitable solution to reallocating C-band spectrum, then proceeded to call the alliance proposal an untested scheme by "foreign-based operators" to clear the spectrum, reimburse the earth station operators who service cable and broadcast networks, then "pocket" the "windfall," which they would maximize by short-changing downstream users.

Again calling it a "scheme," Comcast said it would require the FCC to "abdicate" its role in spectrum allocation--in favor of those deals--risking the reliability the FCC "has deemed important for the public welfare," and cable ops certainly say is crucial to the welfare of their programming distribution system, and "handing over the reins to entities with every incentive to cut corners."

Comcast also says no one has come up with an alternative to C-band satellites for delivering video programming or a plan for fully protecting existing services from interference--Comcast says filters--one suggested fix--are hardly foolproof and in any event are only one piece of the "interference-protection puzzle." Others have suggested moving distribution to fiber, but Comcast says even if it were feasible, it would be a monumental investment in a technology that still "can't replicate the ubiquity and reliability" of C-band satellite distribution.

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: November 8, 2018, 7:31 pm
Brooklyn Nine-Nine premieres on NBC Thursday, Jan. 10 in the 9 p.m. slot. The show ran for five seasons on Fox. Michael Schur and Dan Goor created Brooklyn Nine-Nine and Andy Samberg stars.  NBC has ordered 18 episodes of the cop comedy for season six. Other mid-season premieres include ...

Eighteen episodes ready to roll as series shifts to new network

Brooklyn Nine-Nine premieres on NBC Thursday, Jan. 10 in the 9 p.m. slot. The show ran for five seasons on Fox. Michael Schur and Dan Goor created Brooklyn Nine-Nine and Andy Samberg stars. 

NBC has ordered 18 episodes of the cop comedy for season six.

Other mid-season premieres include Dwayne Johnson’s competition series The Titan Games Jan. 3.

Related: Saving 'Brooklyn Nine-Nine': A Look at Viewer Emotion Surrounding the Sitcom NBC Picked Up

NBC said The Good Place shifts to a 9:30 p.m. slot on Thursdays starting Jan. 10, and Will & Grace moves to 9:30 after The Good Place’s season ends. The first 9:30 Will & Grace will be Jan. 31.

Superstore will be pre-empted before returning in March and I Feel Bad will conclude in December. A decision on the future of I Feel Bad, a comedy from executive producer Amy Poehler, “will be determined at a later date,” said NBC.

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: November 8, 2018, 7:13 pm
AGC Television has closed on a multi-year overall deal for scripted and non-scripted TV projects from Gaspin Media. Jeff Gaspin, former NBC Universal Television Entertainment chairman, heads up Gaspin Media. AGC Television is part of AGC Studios. Stuart Ford launched AGC Studios earlier this year. ...

Former NBC exec will develop and produce scripted and non-scripted content

AGC Television has closed on a multi-year overall deal for scripted and non-scripted TV projects from Gaspin Media. Jeff Gaspin, former NBC Universal Television Entertainment chairman, heads up Gaspin Media.

AGC Television is part of AGC Studios. Stuart Ford launched AGC Studios earlier this year.

Gaspin will develop and produce content alongside Ford, AGC Television President Lourdes Diaz and AGC’s London office. He will join the AGC board.

“I’m excited to partner with AGC and work with Stuart and Lourdes as I continue to tap my entrepreneurial side,” said Gaspin. “With the resources of AGC I can truly grow Gaspin Media into a robust content company.”

Gaspin spent 19 years at NBC Universal, departing when the Comcast takeover occurred. He was previously head of programming at VH1.

He is an executive producer on LA’s Finest for Spectrum’s OTT platform and To Tell the Truth for ABC. Gaspin Media has produced First Impressions for USA, Fit to Fat for A&E and Match Made in Heaven for WE TV.

“We’re really thrilled to have an executive and producer of Jeff’s substance and experience come into the fold and we look forward to growing AGC Television and Gaspin Media as a partnership,” said Ford. 

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: November 8, 2018, 6:53 pm
Media Links, manufacturer and pioneer in Media over IP transport technology, announces the release of ProMD EMS - Japanese, a full Japanese translation of its ProMD Enhanced Management System software. It will be showcased at the upcoming InterBee show, November 14-16, 2018 on the Media Links ...

Media Links, manufacturer and pioneer in Media over IP transport technology, announces the release of ProMD EMS - Japanese, a full Japanese translation of its ProMD Enhanced Management System software. It will be showcased at the upcoming InterBee show, November 14-16, 2018 on the Media Links booth: Hall 3 / 3309.

ProMD EMS – Japanese allows Japanese-speaking users to easily access the power of the ProMD EMS system for Media Links equipment including the MD8000 Series of Media over IP Transport solutions, MDX Series of IP Switches, the MDP3000 series of network edge devices, as well as the associated LAN and WAN networks.

The ProMD EMS system is an essential multi-user software-based tool used to configure, provision, manage and troubleshoot small to large scale IP video and media transport networks. It gives network operators and broadcasters the ability to quickly bring new services online for studio, remote and field locations, all while monitoring and maintaining the performance and reliability of active circuits, trunks and network devices.

Media Links developed ProMD EMS – Japanese as part of its ongoing strategic efforts to provide quality solutions and a refined set of tools to make it straightforward for broadcasters and network service providers to maintain and operate complex media over IP transport networks.

“With such a large installed base of Media Links equipment deployed throughout Japan, it certainly makes the most practical sense to offer our Japanese speaking customers a network management system in their own native language,” states Toshiyuki Naka, SVP, Global Sales of Media Links.

“Software demonstrations can be arranged through our corporate offices in Kawasaki, Japan, and visitors to InterBee 2018 can view the ProMD EMS - Japanese software at the Media Links booth: Hall 3 / 3309,” concludes Toshiyuki Naka.

Author: Kimberley Hebdon
Posted: November 8, 2018, 6:39 pm
Cable operators are telling the FCC that it should not allow a positive train control (PTC) system to use the C-band spectrum (3.7-4.2 GHz) until it resolves its proceeding on repurposing some of that spectrum and until Metrom Rail LLC demonstrates it will not interfere with the C-band downlinks ...

Said train safety system needs to pass interference tests first and should await FCC proceeding wrap-up

Cable operators are telling the FCC that it should not allow a positive train control (PTC) system to use the C-band spectrum (3.7-4.2 GHz) until it resolves its proceeding on repurposing some of that spectrum and until Metrom Rail LLC demonstrates it will not interfere with the C-band downlinks cable operators and broadcasters use to receive network programming via satellite.

That came in joint comments by the American Cable Association and NCTA-The Internet & Television Association on Metrom Rail LLC's request for a waiver for ultrawideband operations in the band using higher-than-ordinarily-allowable power levels.

Related: ACA Says FCC Must Protect C-Band Incumbents

While they say they are all for train safety, an issue that drew a spotlight after some high-profile accidents along the Eastern Seaboard, ACA and NCTA say Metrom has not demonstrated that its system will not interfere with the thousands of earth stations trying to pick up "faint" signals from satellites 35,000 miles above the earth.

"NCTA’s and ACA’s members rely on C-band spectrum to deliver programming to 100 million American households, including 51.9 million cable video customers. Almost every national programming network and many regional networks are distributed using the 3.7-4.2 GHz downlink spectrum to send programming to earth station antennas at network operations centers and cable headends around the country, which then distribute programming on to customers," they told the FCC.

NCTA suggested it had enough trouble with trains just rolling down the track. It point to one NCTA member with a receive facility only 25 feet from a set of tracks. "Even the train traffic itself has a negative impact on the earth station antennas at the site due to the vibrations caused by the heavy loads and it is unclear how Metrom’s proposed operations might impact such sites.

The Metrom request is for initial operations in three areas, Boston, New York and Los Angeles, but it also talks about expanding it under certain conditions. NCTA and ACA have their own conditions for even considering allowing deployment of the system: "The Commission should proceed to consider Metrom’s request for waiver only after (1) Metrom submits detailed technical analysis demonstrating that its proposed operations will not cause harmful interference to C-band downlinks and (2) the Commission resolves its broader 3.7-4.2 GHz rulemaking," they said.

The FCC voted unanimously back in July to find ways to open up the C-band -- either all of the proposed 500 Mhz or some portion of it -- for terrestrial wireless use. Those ways could include an incentive or capacity auction, a market mechanism where incumbents voluntarily strike deals to reduce their footprint, or some other means.

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: November 8, 2018, 6:04 pm
• PERSEUS Plus encoding to be available in industry-leading Lightspeed Live solution • Telestream Lightspeed Live provides support for the most challenging Live video streaming workflows • Support for all devices using native hardware makes PERSEUS Plus the only next-generation codec ready for ...

• PERSEUS Plus encoding to be available in industry-leading Lightspeed Live solution

• Telestream Lightspeed Live provides support for the most challenging Live video streaming workflows

• Support for all devices using native hardware makes PERSEUS Plus the only next-generation codec ready for deployment today

V-Nova, a leading provider of video compression solutions, today announced that its next-generation PERSEUS Plus codec will be supported by Telestream’s Lightspeed Live video streaming system, which is used by numerous major operators and video service providers worldwide.  

Telestream Lightspeed Live provides live multi-screen encoding, packaging and distribution in addition to multichannel video capture and processing. With PERSEUS Plus integrated with Lightspeed Live, operators and service providers can deploy the most efficient and cost-effective encoding and transcoding solutions for live streaming on the market. PERSEUS will be available in Lightspeed Live Stream from version 3.0. 

PERSEUS Plus enables video to be transmitted at half the bitrate of existing h.264 solutions whilst improving picture quality, and the low complexity of PERSEUS Plus h.264 also increases encoding density by 2-3x when compared to HEVC.  

The combination of the two technologies offers video service operators unparalleled performance, serving their customers with the highest quality of experience while significantly increasing operational efficiency. 

“We have always been committed to ensuring our customers have access to the most innovative and advanced video delivery capabilities on the market,” said Scott Murray, VP of Product Management at Telestream. “It is clear that V-Nova’s unique PERSEUS codec plays a key role in rolling out higher-quality and more efficient video services. We’re delighted to be able to offer PERSEUS to our customers.” 

Guido Meardi, CEO and co-founder at V-Nova, said, “We are seeing tremendous momentum with major international video service providers looking to upgrade their video delivery to achieve higher quality. Telestream has come up time and time again as the preferred encoder vendor for so many of them and we’re excited that they will now have an out-of-the-box solution to switch on the power of PERSEUS Plus delivery.” 

Working within industry-standard formats like MPEG-TS, HLS and MPEG-DASH, PERSEUS Plus delivers the best picture quality across any platform, even at low bandwidths. PERSEUS Plus leverages existing dedicated decoder hardware acceleration and works in tandem with existing codecs including AVC/h.264, HEVC, VP9 or in the future AV1 to offer the highest device compatibility in the market. This approach enables all devices to be software updated to receive substantially more efficient video compression without impacting power consumption or decoding reliability. 

The PERSEUS technology works in two ways: PERSEUS Pro is an Intra codec for mathematically lossless and visually lossless professional production, contribution and imaging workflows. PERSEUS Plus is a temporal codec designed to enhance a base codec such as H.264, HEVC or AV1 adding additional layers of detail for unbeatable distribution efficiency to consumers.

Author: Page Melia PR
Posted: November 8, 2018, 5:44 pm
Fox won the Wednesday ratings race, riding Empire to a 1.3/5. That was a little better than NBC’s 1.2/5. Most shows were up, compared with their Halloween-impacted ratings a week before. Empire climbed 25% to a 1.5 and Star grew 22% to 1.1. On NBC, Chicago Med grew 9% to 1.2 and Chicago Fire went ...

Comedies show growth on ABC, including 30% gain for ‘Goldbergs’

Fox won the Wednesday ratings race, riding Empire to a 1.3/5. That was a little better than NBC’s 1.2/5.

Most shows were up, compared with their Halloween-impacted ratings a week before.

Empire climbed 25% to a 1.5 and Star grew 22% to 1.1.

On NBC, Chicago Med grew 9% to 1.2 and Chicago Fire went up 8% to 1.3, before Chicago P.D. was a flat 1.1.

ABC and CBS did 1.1/5s.

On ABC, The Goldbergs shot up 30% for a 1.3 and American Housewife went up 22% to 1.1. Modern Family escalated 17% for a 1.4 while Single Parents went up 11% for a 1.0. A Million Little Things went down 13% for a 0.7.

CBS had Survivor up 23% to 1.6 and SEAL Team up 13% to 0.9, then Criminal Minds north 14% to 0.8.

The CW was at 0.4/2. Riverdale slipped 20% to 0.4 and All American was a level 0.3.

Telemundo and Univision both had a 0.4/2. 

Author: Michael Malone
Posted: November 8, 2018, 5:22 pm
Newly minted NBC Entertainment co-chairs George Cheeks and Paul Telegdy will keynote the NATPE Miami Marketplace & Conference 2019. Cheeks and Telegdy were tapped to lead NBC Entertainment in September after the company announced that NBC Entertainment chairman Robert Greenblatt had left the ...

Organization adds YouTube's Daniels, Discovery's Finch, and UTA"s Hansen to NATPE Board

Newly minted NBC Entertainment co-chairs George Cheeks and Paul Telegdy will keynote the NATPE Miami Marketplace & Conference 2019.

Cheeks and Telegdy were tapped to lead NBC Entertainment in September after the company announced that NBC Entertainment chairman Robert Greenblatt had left the company.

The keynote, which takes place Wednesday, Jan. 23, marks the first public speaking appearance as co-chairs for the duo.

NATPE also named three additional members to their board: Susanne Daniels, global head of original content at YouTube; Kathleen Finch, chief lifestyle brands officer at Discovery Inc.; and Brett Hansen, head of alternative television at UTA.

The 2019 NATPE Miami will take place at the Fontainebleau Hotel from Jan. 22-Jan. 24. The organization will also host an event the Monday prior to the conference, which will be headlined by Tyler Perry.

“Our theme for NATPE Miami this year is ‘Shaping Content Together,’ which is not just a tagline, it is a worldwide call to action to come to Miami this January where deals will get made. We are creating sessions, events and curated meetings that will ensure barriers are broken down between those who create, distribute and monetize best-in-class content internationally. We are excited by the voices that will prime the conversation at the year’s first global television summit,” said JP Bommel, president and CEO, NATPE.

Author: Jessika Walsten
Posted: November 8, 2018, 5:05 pm
BUFFALO, NOVEMBER 7, 2018 - Production Sound Mixer/Boom Operator Adam Bloch was recently tasked with capturing all the hard-hitting, in-your-face audio for a behind-the-scenes look at training camp for a professional football team in Buffalo. Hoping to be as minimally invasive as possible while not ...

BUFFALO, NOVEMBER 7, 2018 - Production Sound Mixer/Boom Operator Adam Bloch was recently tasked with capturing all the hard-hitting, in-your-face audio for a behind-the-scenes look at training camp for a professional football team in Buffalo. Hoping to be as minimally invasive as possible while not missing any dialogue, Bloch relied on his latest wireless RF equipment, the Wisycom MCR42S Dual Diversity Wideband UHF Mini Receiver System and MTP41S Wideband Bodypack Transmitters.

Bloch was first introduced to Wisycom by industry friend and colleague Randy Sparrazza, who was one of the initial adopters of the brand in the U.S. and has become somewhat of a company ambassador. "I worked with Randy on a feature film, and he urged me to use the gear, and insisted that they are the best," says Bloch. "Sure enough, I was very impressed. What puts Wisycom over the top is that it's the only company that offers true diversity on both channels, which is a huge factor for me. There are also little ways that you can tweak your sound quality, which, as far as I know, you can't do with any other brand. Wisycom is the only company that truly meets my needs."

For the training camp documentary, which took place at St. John Fisher College, Bloch had to capture reliable sound from across the three football fields that were being used daily, in addition to audio from within the coaches' offices, locker rooms, film stations and various other campus locations. Bloch positioned his audio stand at the cross section between two of the three fields. He utilized antennas pointed down each field and, depending on what was being filmed at any given moment, the mics were usually 300 to 450 feet away from his station. There were even times when players would head to the locker rooms while mic'd, and Bloch could still capture the audio.

"Even through concrete structures, brick walls and more than 700 feet of distance, I could always hear them," adds Bloch. "In fact, when the camera operators would get to just the other side of the field, they could no longer hear me through their comms, but I could still hear the players. That's how good the Wisycom gear is."

According to Bloch, the difference between Wisycom and competitor brands is "night and day" as the sound is crystal clear and there are zero dropouts. "With my Wisycom gear, I have yet to find a location where I can't find clear frequencies to use," he continues. "That's especially impressive in my home base of Buffalo and Rochester, which have crowded radio space and neighboring bodies of water - Lake Erie and Lake Ontario - that can scramble frequencies and make it tough to capture audio. Having Wisycom's power and range to choose from while being surrounded by these potential interferences, and still being able to capture the sounds inside a building 700 feet away, is magical."

Bloch supports his Wisycom MCR42S receivers and MTP41s transmitters with Sanken COS-11 and Countryman B3 lavalier microphones, Sennheiser MKH 416 shotgun microphones and Audix SCX-1HC Condenser Microphones, along with a Sound Devices 688 SL-6 mixer/recorder. He also relies on K-Tek boom poles, mixer bag, harnesses and accessories.

In addition to its distance, frequency range and reliability, Bloch also prefers Wisycom's compact size. "You don't think a quarter of an inch makes a big difference, but the small-form factor of the MTP41 makes it much more comfortable and easier to pocket," says Bloch. "The MTP41s also don't get hot, whereas others I have used in the past tend to heat up."

After spending a month in training camp, one thing has become very clear to Bloch. "I now know that professional football players can be tackled while wearing Wisycom transmitters and the gear will still work just fine. During a pre-season game, one of the players that was mic'd was hit really hard. He landed right on the mic pack and was in so much pain he couldn't even get his shoulder pads off at the end of the game. But, there was absolutely no damage to any of the Wisycom equipment."

For nearly a decade, Bloch has worked as a sound mixer and boom operator for a variety of feature films, documentaries and reality TV productions. Included among his recent credits are Love After Lockup, Treehouse Masters, Cold Brook, Widows Point and America's Most Terrifying Places, among many others. More information about Bloch can be found here.

About Wisycom

Wisycom is a designer and builder of the most sophisticated RF solutions for broadcast, film and live production, renowned for their durability, flexibility, reliability, practicality and cost-effective price points. Wisycom's design process is driven by attention to detail, customer feedback and ultimate quality, from the selection of components to the manufacturing process, which takes place at the company's Italian plants. The company prides itself on serving as a technical advisor and partner to every customer. From custom design to evaluation and dimensioning of systems, the Wisycom team stands by its customers through every step of the process. For more information, please visit www.wisycom.com.

Author: D. Pagan Communications
Posted: November 8, 2018, 4:13 pm
With a record breaking $238 million in full-year political revenue—up 50% from the last midterm elections, Tegna reported higher earnings in the third quarter. Net income from continuing operations rose 82.9% to $92.8 million, or 43 cents a share, from $50.8 million, or 23 cents a share a year ago. ...

Net income rises in third quarter

With a record breaking $238 million in full-year political revenue—up 50% from the last midterm elections, Tegna reported higher earnings in the third quarter.

Net income from continuing operations rose 82.9% to $92.8 million, or 43 cents a share, from $50.8 million, or 23 cents a share a year ago.

Revenues rose 16.1% to $539 million. 

Tegna said it saw $60 million in political ad spending in the third quarter, up 51% from previous midterms, and $144 for the fourth quarter, up 56%. Total political advertising topped the company’s guidance of $180 million to $200 million.

Excluding political advertising, advertising revenue fell 5%. The company said non-political advertisers were crowded out as the election approached.

Premion, Tegna’s OTT advertising service, remains on pace to reach full-year revenue guidance of $75 million, excluding political revenue.

“We continue to execute growth in shareholder value with another quarter of strong results driven by an increase in year-over-year paid subscribers, strong subscription revenue, and record political revenue,” said CEO Dave Lougee.

“Our portfolio is evolving, and we remain focused on growing these stable and profitable revenue streams. As a result, we expect the mix of high margin subscription and political revenues will comprise approximately half of our total two-year revenue beginning in 2019/2020, and a larger percentage on a rolling two-year cycle, allowing us to continue to deliver value to our shareholders, regardless of cyclical or economic conditions,” Lougee said.

Tegna said in the fourth quarter it expects revenue to increase 30% to 32%. Excluding political ads, revenue is expected to be up mid-single digits. 

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: November 8, 2018, 1:50 pm
Discovery reported lower third-quarter earnings because of about $224 million in charges associated with restructuring following its acquisition of Scripps Networks Interactive. Net income fell to $117 million, or 16 cents a share, from $218 million, or 38 a share. On a pro-forma basis, as if ...

U.S. ad revenue up 5%

Discovery reported lower third-quarter earnings because of about $224 million in charges associated with restructuring following its acquisition of Scripps Networks Interactive.

Net income fell to $117 million, or 16 cents a share, from $218 million, or 38 a share. On a pro-forma basis, as if Scripps Networks was part of Discovery a year ago, excluding foreign currency fluctuations, operating income increased 18%, with U.S. networks up 13%.

Revenue rose 57% to $2.592 million, thanks to the transactions involving Scripps Networks, OWN and Motor Trend. Excluding those deals and currency fluctuations, revenue was up 1%, including a 2% gain at its U.S. networks.

“Our solid third quarter results demonstrate the strength of our brands and unmatched multi-platform distribution network, as we continue to position our broad suite of IP to maximize value and extend our global presence,” said CEO David Zaslav.

David Zaslav

"We are very pleased with how far we've come in the eight months since we closed our merger with Scripps Networks, highlighted by the acceleration of synergy generation and strong adjusted OIBDA growth in the third quarter,” Zaslav said. “Additionally, we continue to drive organic growth opportunities across our diverse portfolio, further positioning us for continued cash flow generation and additional value creation. We remain increasingly optimistic about the roadmap ahead of us as we drive forward with our plan to transform our company.”

Operating income at Discovery’s U.S. Networks rose 88% to 901 million with the acquisition of Scripps Networks. Excluding the impact of the acquisition, revenue was up 2% with an 8% gain in advertising offset by a 2% drop in distribution revenue. Other revenue was down 29%.

On a pro-forma basis calculated as if the Scripps networks had been part of Discovery a year ago, revenue was up 4%, ad revenue was up 5% and distribution revenue was flat.

Ad revenue growth was driven by an increase in prices and volume plus continue monetization of digital viewership, offset by lower audiences at the linear networks.

On a pro-forma basis, subscribers were down 5% and subscribers to the company’s fully distributed networks was down 2%.

Discovery acquired Scripps Networks in March and bought a controlling interest in OWN in Nov. 2017. The Motor Trend Group was incorporated in September 2017.

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: November 8, 2018, 12:39 pm
CNN said late Wednesday that the White House had pulled senior White House correspondent Jim Acosta's press pass "until further notice," prompting calls for its immediate return. Acosta tweeted the news Wednesday. The move came after Acosta peppered the President with questions during a contentious ...

CNN stands behind veteran correspondent; RTDNA calls for press pass return ASAP

CNN said late Wednesday that the White House had pulled senior White House correspondent Jim Acosta's press pass "until further notice," prompting calls for its immediate return.

Acosta tweeted the news Wednesday.

The move came after Acosta peppered the President with questions during a contentious post-election news conference, trying to get a response to why the President had called the immigrant caravan an "invasion" and whether he thought indictments were coming down in the Russia election-meddling probe. The president called Acosta a rude, terrible person and said CNN should not employ him.

"White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders announced in a statement that Acosta would be stripped of what's known as a 'hard pass,' which gives him access to the White House grounds," CNN said. Trump had also said that Acosta's treatment of Sanders was "horrible," though he did not say on what that was based.

Related: Commercials Had to Wait as Votes Were Counted

CNN stood squarely behind Acosta, saying the White House move was retaliation for his "challenging questions." The network said that in explaining the pass's revocation, Sanders had lied. "She provided fraudulent accusations and cited an incident that never happened," the network said. "This unprecedented decision is a threat to our democracy and the country deserves better. Jim Acosta has our full support."

The Radio-Television Digital News Association threw its weight behind CNN's senior White House correspondent and condemned the White House's action, saying the pass should be returned ASAP.

“The leader of the free world has consistently ridiculed journalists who report the truth as purveyors of ‘fake news’ and the ‘[enemies] of the American people.’ To go a nearly unprecedented step further and revoke the credentials of a responsible journalist who was merely attempting to ask a question of the president is unconscionable,” said RTDNA Executive Director Dan Shelley.

Sanders posted a tweet defending the move and including video purportedly showing Acosta manhandling the intern.

Of the White House's assertion that Acosta had "essentially assaulted" a White House staffer who attempted to take his microphone away, Shelley said: "Any objective observer of the staffer’s attempt to confiscate the microphone Mr. Acosta was holding would surely conclude that he acted professionally and in a non-aggressive manner. He even said to her, ‘pardon me, ma’am.'"

Sanders also attacked CNN in a Tweet:

"This is clearly inappropriate and unprecedented punishment by the Trump administration for what it perceives as unfair coverage by the reporter, and White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders’ false description of the events leading up to it is insulting not only to the nation’s journalists, but to its people," said the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press.

The White House Correspondents Association was equally unhappy:

"We can all watch the video; Acosta simply did not do what the White House claims," said Suzanne Lysak, associate professor of broadcast and digital journalism at Syracuse University's Newhouse School. "He asked questions the president didn’t like. That is the only thing this is about, really.  That and the fact you have two aggressive personalities;  one asks questions for a living and the other balks at being challenged."

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: November 8, 2018, 7:32 am
New York, New York – November 7, 2018 – The Television Bureau of Advertising (TVB) announces that total spending on political advertisements on local broadcast television in 2018 has set an all-time record for a midterm cycle, and any previous election cycle, based upon Kantar Media/CMAG’s latest ...

TVB cites new record for political ad spending on local broadcast television for any election cycle

New York, New York – November 7, 2018 – The Television Bureau of Advertising (TVB) announces that total spending on political advertisements on local broadcast television in 2018 has set an all-time record for a midterm cycle, and any previous election cycle, based upon Kantar Media/CMAG’s latest figures.

“Campaigns, PACs and other entities spent over $3 billion dollars on local broadcast television advertising in the 2018 midterm cycle,” commented TVB President & CEO, Steve Lanzano. “There is no doubt that local broadcast TV delivers for political campaigns. Candidates continue to derive tangible, winning results from local broadcast television. Tuesday’s dominant reliance on TV, over all other media platforms, demonstrates that voters rely on local broadcast TV to inform their voting decisions.”

“2018 was uncertain in every way; the volatility this cycle was unprecedented,” said Kyle Roberts, President and CEO of Advertising Analytics. “It’s why we saw candidates and campaigns go back to what is tried and true: if you use TV, it reaches voters and they listen. TV works.”

Advertising Analytics reports local broadcast TV increased more than 100 percent from the 2014 cycle. Advertising Analytics also reports that three out of four dollars spent on traditional media went to local broadcast television.

“It’s true that local broadcast TV carried the day for all candidates,” added Roberts.

“Kantar and Advertising Analytics’ numbers prove what we already know and what our members have shared with us: voters trust local television and turn to their local, vetted news programming to make important voting decisions,” continued Lanzano.

Spending was up across the board, as heavy voter involvement and interest resulted in extensive efforts to reach and motivate voters.

This election cycle demonstrates that when it comes to political advertising, campaigns look for what influences voters most. Kantar Media/CMAG General Manager Steve Passwaiter noted, “The numbers speak for themselves. TV remains at the forefront of ad choices for political decision makers.”

While final numbers are yet to be confirmed, Kantar reports that political campaigns, PACs and other entities spent at least $3.01 billion on local broadcast television ads. Key races included:

· $115,537,020 spent in the Florida Senate race

· $63,452,900 spent in the Missouri Senate race

· $55,050,980 spent in the Nevada Senate race

· $47,927,190 spent in the Arizona Senate race

· $37,537,750 spent in the Tennessee Senate race

In 2018, campaigns needed to tap into intense voter interest, looking to increase turnout. In this environment, local broadcast television’s established presence provided an edge. Voters trust their local TV stations, with 80 percent of respondents to an American Conversation Study, commissioned by TVB and conducted by Engagement Labs, reporting that they trust local broadcast TV news and 75 percent stating that they trust news from local TV websites. In 2018’s hyper-charged environment, this trust matters.

It’s clear that television was the choice for political decision makers in 2018.

“Trust and influence drive the power of local broadcast TV advertising to deliver,” said TVB’s Steve Lanzano. “Candidates and campaigns turned to local television to reach voters. This year’s spending and results prove they were right.”

###

About TVB:

TVB is the not-for-profit trade association representing America’s $21 billion local broadcast television industry. Its members include over 800 individual television stations, television broadcast groups, advertising sales reps, syndicators, international broadcasters and associate members.

About We Get Voters:

We Get Voters is a campaign created by the Television Bureau of Advertising (TVB) to promote local broadcast TV’s voter influence and political impact.

Author: Wire Contributor
Posted: November 8, 2018, 3:10 am
Nielsen estimates that 36.1 million people tuned in to watch primetime coverage of the results of the midterm elections on Tuesday. Four years ago during the previous midterm election, 22.7 million viewers tuned in during primetime. The 2016 Presidential election drew 71 million viewers. Related: ...

Up from 22M in 2014

Nielsen estimates that 36.1 million people tuned in to watch primetime coverage of the results of the midterm elections on Tuesday.

Four years ago during the previous midterm election, 22.7 million viewers tuned in during primetime.

The 2016 Presidential election drew 71 million viewers.

Related: Talent Powers TV’s Social Media Engagement: Nielsen

Previous midterms drew more viewers than 2014, but not more than 2018. In 2010, the total was 34.9 million. In 2006 it was 31.4 million and 26.3 million watched in 2002.

Tuesday’s midterm coverage, drew a 22.2 household rating.

Most of the 2018 viewership was age 55 and up, with 20.2 million people in that demographic tuning in. There were 13.2 million people ages 35 to 43 and just 5.3 million 18 to 34.

The networks included in Nielsen’s total are ABC, CBS, NBC, Telemundo, Univision, PBS, CNN, CNNe, Fox Business, Fox News Channel and MSNBC.

Author: Jon Lafayette
Posted: November 8, 2018, 2:19 am
Cable and telecom vet Ned Lamont has won the Connecticut Governorship, narrowly besting Republican Bob Stefanowski, as well as two independent candidates and a libertarian. Lamont worked for Cablevision Systems before starting his own company, Lamont Digital Systems (Campus Televideo), in 1984, ...

Third time is charm for former senatorial, gubernatorial candidate

Cable and telecom vet Ned Lamont has won the Connecticut Governorship, narrowly besting Republican Bob Stefanowski, as well as two independent candidates and a libertarian.

Lamont worked for Cablevision Systems before starting his own company, Lamont Digital Systems (Campus Televideo), in 1984, which delivers cable and distance learning services to college campuses. It was sold in 2015.

Lamont has been elected to public office in his hometown of Greenwich, where he was a selectman, and has held statewide posts. But he came to national political prominence in 2006 when he beat Joe Lieberman for the Democratic nomination for the Senate only to lose to him in a three-way race when Lieberman ran as an Independent.

Lamont ran unsuccessfully for governor in 2010.

Lamont did not play up his communications resume on his campaign site, saying he took on "the large and established giants of the telecom industry" with his company that "grew to serve over 400 of America's largest college campuses and one million college students across the nation."

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: November 8, 2018, 12:36 am
President Donald Trump trampled on his post-election message of Senate pickups and a better performance in his first midterm than Presidents Obama or Clinton in a combative press conference in which he was even harsher than usual on the media, CNN notably. CNN countered that the President's attacks ...

Stands behind Acosta after tense exchange with President

President Donald Trump trampled on his post-election message of Senate pickups and a better performance in his first midterm than Presidents Obama
or Clinton in a combative press conference in which he was even harsher than usual on the media, CNN notably. CNN countered that the President's
attacks had gone too far.

In a lengthy press conference, after being pressed repeatedly by CNN's Jim Acosta on the President's characterization of the migrant caravan as an "invasion" and whether there would be indictments coming down on the Russia investigation, he first told Acosta to put down the mic, then called the White House reporter a "rude, terrible person" and said CNN "should be ashamed of itself having you work for them." He also said CNN's treatment of press secretary Sarah Sanders was horrible.

Related: Dems Take House in "Blue Wave"

He said when CNN reports fake news, which he said it did a lot, they were the enemy of the American people. He also said CNN had gotten the election polls wrong, which he called "voter suppression." The President also sparred with other reporters asking, or trying to ask, tough questions or defending Acosta.

Acosta said later on CNN that when the President goes low he continues to do his job, but that he was surprised that what he thought would be a post-election victory lap came off as a pity party, with the President sounding depressed and defeated over the results. Acosta said the President had appeared to spiral out of control over his "big loss."

The press conference came before Session's firing was revealed, so that was not a subject up for discussion.

Following the President's heated exchange with Acosta, CNN put out an "enough is enough" statement.

"This President's ongoing attacks on the press have gone too far. They are not only dangerous, they are disturbingly un-American. While President Trump has made it clear he does not respect a free press, he has a sworn obligation to protect it. A free press is vital to democracy and we stand behind Jim Acosta and his fellow journalists everywhere."

Fox's Howard Kurtz called the Trump/CNN war of words "unprecedented." 

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: November 8, 2018, 12:02 am
The Department of Justice has charged two executives of a poster company with conspiring to fix the prices of their posters, using search algorithms to do so. Antitrust chief Makan Delrahim let the algorithmic cat out of the bag in a speech Wednesday (Nov. 7) to the Federal Institute of ...

Had signaled first-ever such digital price-fixing case was imminent

The Department of Justice has charged two executives of a poster company with conspiring to fix the prices of their posters, using search algorithms to do so.

Antitrust chief Makan Delrahim let the algorithmic cat out of the bag in a speech Wednesday (Nov. 7) to the Federal Institute of Telecommunications Conference in Mexico City on enforcing antitrust in the digital age.

Delrahim had signaled in a Senate hearing last month that DOJ was wrapping up a first-ever criminal case against the anticompetitive use of search algorithms in a "price-fixing scheme." He called it a "fun" case.

He said algorithms, even ones setting prices, aren't inherently anticompetitive. It was the conspiracy among two competitors to fix the price that drew the censure.

He said that the conspiracy on Amazon Marketplace involved an agreement between the poster sellers to use algorithms to fix the prices. One conspirator allegedly programmed the algorithm to search for the lowest price offered by a "non-conspiring" competitor and set a price for their poster just below that—generally the lower price appears first in Amazon Marketplace, said Delrahim, who conceded that retailers know that and often use algorithms to price their products "accordingly."

Where the conspiracy came in was the agreement with another poster seller, who programmed his algorithm to match that slightly lower price. "That let the conspirators’ products appear near the top of the search query without having to compete with each other," he said. "Although they programmed their algorithms differently, the conspirators used algorithms to fix prices and avoid competition."

Thanks to the digital age, such price fixing could be essentially self-executing he pointed out, which makes the conduct harder to identify.

"While algorithms can be used to facilitate price fixing, it is important to keep in mind that they are not inherently anticompetitive. Indeed, algorithms are an important part of the digital economy and can account for great efficiencies that benefit consumers," he said. "We continue to study the implications that algorithms have for competition policy, and will enforce vigorously the antitrust laws against any illegal agreement."

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: November 7, 2018, 11:02 pm
Department of Justice antitrust chief Makan Delrahim Wednesday put an exclamation point on what might now be called the AT&T-Time Warner Doctrine given the confluence of that case with Delrahim's emphasis on spin-offs versus conditions in vertical mergers: "If a structural remedy isn’t ...

Talks up need for divestitures in combos of distribution and programming in all but 'rare' cases

Department of Justice antitrust chief Makan Delrahim Wednesday put an exclamation point on what might now be called the AT&T-Time Warner Doctrine given the confluence of that case with Delrahim's emphasis on spin-offs versus conditions in vertical mergers: "If a structural remedy isn’t available, then, except in the rarest of circumstances, we will seek to block an illegal merger."

Makan Delrahim

That came in a speech to the Federal Institute of Telecommunications Conference in Mexico City on enforcing antitrust in the digital age.

In seeking to block the AT&T-Time Warner merger, Makan has said that it was because structural remedies (asset divestitures) not behavioral remedies like program access and oversight conditions were necessary.

Delrahim: Antitrust Can Still Get at New Business Models

He preached the necessity of that approach to the Mexican audience, according to a copy of his speech. "Behavioral remedies present three main problems, he said. "The first is that they are inherently regulatory, which is to say that they substitute central decision making for the preferred free market. The second reason is closely related to the first: The Antitrust Division is a law enforcer and, even where regulation is appropriate, it is not equipped to be the ongoing regulator. The third reason that behavior decrees are problematic is that they are merely temporary fixes for an ongoing problem."

He conceded that content platforms like Netflix, Amazon, Hulu and YouTube have led to an "explosion of new content" from which to choose, which made it easier to approve a Disney/Fox deal than in the past. 

But he said the same facts could lead to greater concern in other kinds of mergers, AT&T-Time Warner for example.

"For instance, a merger that combined a significant content creation company with a significant content distribution company might raise the prospect of foreclosure," he said. "Independently, each side of the merger may have had the incentive but not the ability to harm its horizontal rivals. Together, depending on the circumstances, the combined company may have both the incentive and the ability to harm its rivals, and ultimately consumers."

That was DOJ's argument in trying to block the AT&T-Time Warner deal as anticompetitive, and now in appealing the decision of a federal district court that DOJ had not made that case.

Delrahim cited the Dec. 6 oral argument in that appeal, but did not handicap DOJ's chances for success.

Author: John Eggerton
Posted: November 7, 2018, 9:36 pm
Avondale, Ariz., Nov. 12, 2018 – Fast cars, fast trucks, and even faster audio and video feeds. Students from The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS; www.cras.edu), the premier institution for audio engineering education, recently had the opportunity to practice mixing live audio ...

Avondale, Ariz., Nov. 12, 2018 – Fast cars, fast trucks, and even faster audio and video feeds.

Students from The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS; www.cras.edu), the premier institution for audio engineering education, recently had the opportunity to practice mixing live audio and video feeds from host broadcaster NBC SPORTS in the school’s 42-ft. remote-production mobile broadcast trailer during The Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series Can-Am 500, NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Lucas Oil 150, and NASCAR Xfinity Series Whelen Trusted To Perform 200 races at ISM Raceway in Avondale, Ariz. from Nov. 9-11.

“Orchestrated by Sports Broadcast Hall of Fame inductee Fred Aldous, our students received audio and video feeds as well as the directors’ and producers’ directives from FOX SPORTS on Friday for the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series race, and Saturday and Sunday they received the feeds from NBC Sports for the Xfinity Series and the Can-Am 500 races,” explained Kirt Hamm, CRAS administrator “We had 11 students per day per race event. The entire experience was an eye opener and a tremendous learning experience for them, that’s for sure.”

Robert Brock, CRAS Director of Education, added, “A1 Denis Ryan, Submixer Steve Urick, and Audio Guarantee Sean Peacock all took time to encourage our students and shoot straight with them about what it takes to succeed at their level. For our students to be able to hear this from professionals at this level as they work during a major nationally broadcast sporting event is absolutely priceless.”

Prior to the races, the CRAS student teams walked the track to study the microphone placements as well as the interconnect between the track feeds and the broadcast trucks. During the races they mixed the feeds in simulated real-world situations.

“When I was starting out I would have given my eyeteeth to have had the kind of opportunity that CRAS is providing their students out here,” said Denis Ryan, NBC Sports A1.

CRAS’ 42-ft. remote-production mobile broadcast unit is designed to be a working replica of a real-world broadcast production trailer stocked with top shelf industry professional audio and video equipment that are utilized by leading television network broadcast engineer crews.

“This event allows our future audio engineers to experience a part of the industry that has special demands and skill sets,” Hamm continued. “It helps our students identify if this is a passion area that they want to pursue after completion of our program and enter the Live Broadcast industry on their 280 hour internship, which is part of graduation requirements. We cannot thank NBC SPORTS enough for allowing us these opportunities for our students to interact with their teams throughout the weekend. Their crews are the best in the business and are always very gracious with their time and willing to share their insights and methods with us.”

The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences is composed of two nearby campuses in Gilbert and Tempe, Ariz. A CRAS education includes broadcast audio, live sound, film and TV audio, music, and video game audio, all taught by award-winning instructors who have all excelled in their individual fields, including sound reinforcement, audio recording and production, digital recording, troubleshooting/maintenance, and music business.

CRAS structured programs and highly qualified teaching staff provide a professional and supportive atmosphere, which is complemented by its small class sizes allowing for individual instruction and assistance for students in engineering audio recordings. CRAS has been providing quality vocational training in audio recording for more than three decades. The curriculum and equipment are constantly being updated to keep pace with the rapid advancements in the music and sound recording industries. CRAS’ course offerings and subject matter have always centered around the skills and knowledge necessary for students’ success in the audio recording industries.

The 11-month program is designed to allow every student access to learn and train in all of the Conservatory’s studios which are comprised with state-of-the-art audio recording and mixing gear, the same equipment used in today’s finest studios and remote broadcast facilities, including Pro Tools 12, API Legacy consoles, SSL AWS consoles, Studer Vista consoles, and much more. All students must complete a 280-hour industry internship to graduate from the Master Recording Program II that may ultimately lead to industry employment.

For more information on the Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences, please visit www.cras.edu, contact Kirt Hamm, administrator, at 1-800-562-6383, or email to info@cras.edu.

About The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences

Based in the heart of The Valley of the Sun with two campuses in Gilbert and Tempe, Ariz., The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS) is one of the country’s premier institutions for audio education. The Conservatory has developed a unique and highly effective way to help the future audio professional launch their careers in the recording industry and other related professional audio categories.

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Author: CRL Public Relations
Posted: November 12, 2018, 6:18 pm
BRUSSELS — With some 30 live onsite broadcasts per year, VRT’s hit station MNM is an intensive user of the organization’s outside on-air infrastructure. So much so that the Belgian Dutch-language public broadcaster set up a new on-air mobile facility, specifically designed to fit MNM’s mobile ...

Lightweight, portable set-up provides a direct link to the VRT master control room

BRUSSELS — With some 30 live onsite broadcasts per year, VRT’s hit station MNM is an intensive user of the organization’s outside on-air infrastructure. So much so that the Belgian Dutch-language public broadcaster set up a new on-air mobile facility, specifically designed to fit MNM’s mobile needs.

“In the past, we used either studio gear that was either too heavy or with limited technical options,” said Hans Rits, head of Radio Realization for MNM. “The new outside radio configuration had to be compact, light-weight and able to be operated by one person. We carefully went over the technical aspects bearing in minds these parameters.”

Hans Rits, head of radio realization for MNM demonstrates the single display presenter position. All Photos: VRT

View the 6 images of this gallery on the original article

Systems integrator Amptec built and integrated the mobile on-air unit, as part of its framework contract with the public broadcaster. “The presenter’s desk is a clone of the ‘banana’-shaped design in MNM’s main studio,” said Jasper Willems, Amptec’s broadcast project engineer. “We made it fit into two flight cases and it looks like a real on-air studio.”

Whereas in the past, the presenter used four displays, the new layout has just one central display and a laptop for the presenter. Like in MNM’s main on air studio, the mobile set is using a DHD MX series modular console with a XC2 core and Dalet Plus playout software.

“The DJ has the option to prepare his or her program on a laptop using Dalet via VRT’s dedicated VPN tunnel and export it into the system,” Rits said. “At present we use a local playout system, but we have plans to set up a remote playout engine in the future.” Two Shure Beta 87 microphones, Sennheiser HME headsets, a TC Electronic M 2000 effects processor and an Empirical Labs Distressor complete the configuration.

“As for the connectivity, we have replaced the VDSL lines from the past by a Peplink Pepwave MAX HD4 routing system — it holds multiple SIM cards from different providers and automatically selects the best connection,” explained Rits. “Another novelty is that the mobile studio’s signal is routed via a Prodys Quantum codec and goes directly on air via the VRT’s radio master control room instead of through the main studio.”

[Read: Radio 2 Limburg Goes on Air, in the Air]

The basic set up consists of four flightcases that can either be used in combination with the station’s radio trailer or as an individual on-air set up. A self-op presenter, engineer and a social media editor operate MNM’s mobile studio. “MNM is a 360° brand and in addition to our FM and DAB+ on-air signal, we want to fully integrate social media content in our programs,” Rits added.

Rino Ver Eecke, MNM station manager, underlined the importance of the station’s outside broadcasts. “Connecting with the audience, meeting our listeners and making radio is key for us. The implementation of creative and innovative technology is one of our priorities,” he said. 

“MNM is a hit radio station targeting 12 to 44 year olds — listeners who are open to new technology. In addition to visual content, we are experimenting with an AETA ScoopFone 4G, allowing remote presentation from virtually any place worldwide, and LiveU, combining a backpack with SIM-cards and a GoPro camera, transmitting live image streaming to our MNM-smartphone app.”

The new mobile on-air unit was inaugurated in September to cover an MNM contest, where 10 MNM listeners won a five-day trip to New York for a special morning drive show broadcast aired from the “Big Apple.” On Oct 24–28, Peter van de Veire hosted his morning show from New York with the help of a “light” version of the MNM mobile studio, which served as a “remote-control” studio MNM’s on air facility in Brussels.

Author: Marc Maes
Posted: November 12, 2018, 10:55 am
LONDON — The BBC is joining with Xperi’s DTS subsidiary to test the DTS Connected Radio platform over the next 18 months.  Also known as “hybrid radio,” DTS Connected Radio combines program information transmitted by local radio broadcasters with data pulled from the internet.  The ...

Test combines over-the-air content with IP-delivered program data

The DTS Connected Radio All Stations feature delivers a complete list of all radio stations available in the market, including station logo, name and format. All Photos: Xperi

LONDON — The BBC is joining with Xperi’s DTS subsidiary to test the DTS Connected Radio platform over the next 18 months. 

Also known as “hybrid radio,” DTS Connected Radio combines program information transmitted by local radio broadcasters with data pulled from the internet. 

The result, according to the company, is a much richer and immediate listening/reading/interactive experience for the car’s occupants, compared to the limited metadata that can be transmitted over radio alone.

The Favorites’ function the DTS Connected Radio platform displays the listener’s favorite stations (presets) with their logo displayed prominently and the name of the content that is playing. 

“The trial will provide a full hybrid radio experience testing across a number of receiver types, test platforms, prototype receivers and in-vehicle radios,” said Joe D'Angelo, Xperi’s SVP Broadcast. 

“In particular, the trial will test the seamless listening experience between broadcast (FM, DAB, DAB+) and BBC metadata on the move. The trial will include all BBC radio services.”

The DTS Connected Radio’s Live Guide presents a list of what's now playing on all radio stations in the market. 

The BBC/DTS in-car trial will be conducted using Xperi’s Connected Radio Evaluation Unit (CREU), which is a full hardware and software reference receiver installed in the test vehicle. 

“This radio platform enables testing and validation of both over-the-air analog and DAB+ services alongside the IP content and services provided by DTS Connected Radio,” said D’Angelo.

Using CREU, the full DTS Connect Radio suite of services can be implemented in a customized user interface designed and/or modified by the BBC or any other testing partner(s). “This enables broadcasters to evaluate the delivery and presentation of their connected radio content and dynamically modify both the content production and end user experience,” he said.

This photo shows the ‘Now Playing' experience in the DTS Connected Radio platform.

[Read: Xperi Partners With Commercial Radio Australia]

The goal of the BBC/DTS trial is to ensure that hybrid radio provides a good listening/interaction experience for in-car users. “The results will help inform the BBC’s digital radio strategy in the car,” said D’Angelo. 

“The BBC wants to learn how hybrid radio will be delivered and understand the end user experience. We are also working together on future features, including making podcasts available.”

Author: James Careless
Posted: November 12, 2018, 10:05 am
The author is membership program director of the National Federation of Community Broadcasters. NFCB commentaries are featured regularly at www.radioworld.com. As the United States winds into the close of hurricane season, 2019 has seen its share of stressful environmental calamity. Florida saw ...

The restaurant chain has developed a response plan community radio can learn from

The author is membership program director of the National Federation of Community Broadcasters. NFCB commentaries are featured regularly at www.radioworld.com.

As the United States winds into the close of hurricane season, 2019 has seen its share of stressful environmental calamity. Florida saw devastating storms, torrential rains struck Louisiana and Texas, and many more states felt the impact of unforeseen weather emergencies. Radio stations are not exempt from the drama, with power outages, floods and fires disrupting service and even taking some outlets completely off the air for a time.

All summer long, the National Federation of Community Broadcasters talked with community radio stations about emergency preparedness. The variety of issues a community can experience is really countless. Some stations are far more ready others. Others are trying to get their heads around what a response plan for a local catastrophe might entail.

While there are many comprehensive repositories for information on this subject, including NFCB, there is one place you probably would never think of when you ponder a regional emergency: Waffle House.

[Read: Community Broadcaster: Giving Context]

If you are in or have visited the South, chances are you have spotted one of these bright yellow 24-hour breakfast diners along some nondescript highway. The cheese grits, chili topped hash browns and, of course, waffles have made Waffle House a venue of universal appeal, one that cuts across virtually every line you can think of. It is also an establishment that takes its commitment to being open 24 hours a day very seriously.

The podcast Household Name recently shined some light on the practices of Waffle House during times of disaster. Why? For one, Waffle House has some uncommon tenacity when it comes to not letting natural disasters thwart customers. The restaurant manages to keep the doors open, even during electricity outages and floods that shut down Starbucks, McDonald’s and other chains nearby. In 2011, the Federal Emergency Management Agency coined the term Waffle House index to gauge the gravity of an emergency. If Waffle House stores are open, things are not too bad. If they’re closed? FEMA knew to deploy some major resources there, because matters were grave.

As FiveThirtyEight famously put in a headline, “If Waffle House Is Closed, It’s Time to Panic.”

How did a place known best for its biscuits and eggs manage to get that sort of reputation? And what can a community radio station that is not too sure about this disaster preparedness thing learn from Waffle House?

Central to the chain’s strategy is the mission guiding this effort. The restaurant sees itself as part of local communities. Unlike others, it is not franchised, and its leaders see being open as being faithful to its customers and employees. Their existence and availability are part of a town’s sense of normalcy. I often wonder if community radio takes its place in its city or town with similar reverence, and how that kind of priority might shape our approach to the medium during a crisis.

With the values of these endeavors clear, what Waffle House does from here is disturbingly simple. It prepares generators and supplies; a linkup to its existing security apparatus such as cameras near stores; people able to respond on the spot; connections with area first responders and media; and clarity about its supply chain — where does fuel, food and power come from when infrastructure is compromised and/or your traditional suppliers are closed.

Such planning might give your station pause. Who is on your team in times like this? What equipment do you have on hand? What security is set up near your facility? All these questions are important.

Obviously, the components Waffle House interrogates are complicated and require a great deal of preparation to be able to address an issue quickly. And indeed there is more to it all than that. However, on their face, the Waffle House strategy is far more direct than the myriad meetings upon meetings upon meetings many of us are used to in community radio. Sitting down and identifying your resources and people can go a long way to resolving these matters for your station. They also take out the mental blocks we commonly deal with when tackling a subject as complex as emergency preparedness.

Still, if you told a community radio station manager, she or he could learn a few things from Waffle House, you would likely get a laugh. It turns out that the little yellow diner has a few tricks it can show community-based media.

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Author: Ernesto Aguilar
Posted: November 9, 2018, 11:32 pm
iHeartMedia Atlanta has tapped Orlando Rosa to serve as program director for WBZY(FM). In Dallas, KDMX(FM) has chosen Carter to serve as afternoon drive host and assistant PD, effective Dec. 3, and Brooke Morrison will take over as night host for him. Rosa will report to iHeartMedia Atlanta Region ...

Brooke Morrison will take over as night host for Carter

Orlando Rosa

iHeartMedia Atlanta has tapped Orlando Rosa to serve as program director for WBZY(FM). In Dallas, KDMX(FM) has chosen Carter to serve as afternoon drive host and assistant PD, effective Dec. 3, and Brooke Morrison will take over as night host for him.

Rosa will report to iHeartMedia Atlanta Region Senior Vice President of Programming Brian Michel.

Rosa most recently served as the operations manager for Rivera Communications. Prior to that, he also served as the vice president for Latino News of Tennessee. Rosa began his career at WRLM in Birmingham.

Heart Atlanta owns and operates WUBL(FM), WWPW(FM), WBZY(FM), WRDA, WRDG(FM) and WGST(AM).

Carter

Carter also previously had stints as program director for KWTX in Waco, Texas, and also worked as an on-air personality for KJYO in Oklahoma City; WFLZ in Tampa, Fla.; WAPE in Jacksonville, Fla.; and WWWQ in Atlanta. He began his career at WBGG in Miami.

Morrison began her radio career at KCOU at the University of Missouri as a DJ. She has also been on air for WHQC in Charlotte, N.C., and KSLZ in St. Louis, Mo.

iHeart Dallas owns and operates KHKS(FM), KDMX(FM), KDGE(FM), KEGL(FM), KZPS(FM) and KFXR(AM).

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Author: Emily M. Reigart
Posted: November 9, 2018, 10:41 pm
A tower fire on the master FM antenna at West Tiger Mountain Thursday morning forced a half-dozen radio broadcasters to shift to backup facilities. Early photos of the incident showed smoke clearly visible at the top of the American Tower site in the foothills east of Seattle. Six FM stations on ...

Entercom, Hubbard and iHeartMedia stations affected

View the 9 images of this gallery on the original article

A tower fire on the master FM antenna at West Tiger Mountain Thursday morning forced a half-dozen radio broadcasters to shift to backup facilities. Early photos of the incident showed smoke clearly visible at the top of the American Tower site in the foothills east of Seattle.

Six FM stations on the master were impacted by the fire: Entercom’s KSWD(FM), iHeartMedia’s KBKS(FM), KJAQ(FM) and KZOK(FM) along with Hubbard’s KNUC(FM) and KQMV(FM).

Clay Freinwald, who works as a “tower watcher” for American Tower, told Radio World in an email that initial calls to the fire department came in from motorists around 6:45 a.m. PST on Thursday. The fire was declared out by 8:00 a.m.

The rough terrain made it difficult for firefighters to reach the site, according to various media outlets in the area.

“After looking at some of the pictures, taken by friends, local TV stations and those posted to social media, it was clear the big master antenna was emitting large quantities of smoke and not a building, much to my surprise,” he writes.

Freinwald continued, “Alex Brewster, Entercom staff engineer, brought his drone to the site to gather pictures and videos. This helped us to understand what happened with this big 32-bay antenna (eight bays, four-around).”

A crew from Electronics Research Inc. (ERI) is expected to be on-site Saturday to climb, examine and determine what it will take to get the system back online. “We are all expecting it will be some time since this is happening as winter is getting close. At over 3,000 feet and 47 degrees north, weather is going to be a big factor,” Freinwald wrote in his email.

A nearby tower at the same site, which serves area TV stations, was not damaged by the fire.

Freinwald didn’t speculate on what could have caused the fire near the top of the 200-foot tower, but did add that he does not suspect vandalism. “This was clearly a failure of a portion of the antenna.”

The fire remains under investigation.

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Author: Randy J. Stine
Posted: November 9, 2018, 9:00 pm
In a tucked away, nondescript complex in an industrial section of San Francisco, community radio fans gathered on Sept. 4 in anticipation of the launch of KXSF(LP) by non-profit group San Francisco Community Radio. A rare opportunity to witness a terrestrial radio station’s debut in San Francisco, ...

KXSF(LP) launches in San Francisco, reanimating the KUSF(FM) spirit

KXSF(LP) studio.

In a tucked away, nondescript complex in an industrial section of San Francisco, community radio fans gathered on Sept. 4 in anticipation of the launch of KXSF(LP) by non-profit group San Francisco Community Radio.

A rare opportunity to witness a terrestrial radio station’s debut in San Francisco, the celebratory low-power FM party spilled over into an adjacent room at Lightrail Studios, the music recording and rehearsal space that houses KXSF(LP).

While KXSF volunteers, listeners and other interested parties nibbled on pizza and sipped wine, a videographer roamed about, bearing witness to the launch. Although it’s a brand-new LPFM radio station, the story of San Francisco Community Radio has attracted both local and national attention because of its connection to the former full-power college radio station KUSF.

Board in KXSF(LP) studio.

KUSF AND KUSF.ORG

Well-loved college radio station KUSF operated on 90.3 FM in San Francisco from 1977 until early 2011. The license holder, the University of San Francisco, opted to cede control of its airwaves, ultimately selling the 90.3 FM signal to Classical Public Radio Network to be used as a KDFC-branded classical music station.

Today, the license is held by University of Southern California and the 90.3 frequency continues to carry KDFC programming. The call letters (changed from KUSF to KOSC in 2012) changed to KDFC in 2017.

“Good Luck! Go for Launch” note perched on board in KXSF(LP) studio.

Even after KUSF left the FM dial, KUSF.org remained, at first airing a loop of music post-shutdown. By 2012, college students at University of San Francisco were running and programming KUSF.org as an online radio station, which is alive and well today.

Prior to 2011, KUSF(FM) had a roster of programmers who ranged from college students to long-time community-member volunteers. The loss of the FM station was met with anger, sadness and protests. Although the university did not waver in its decision to dispense with the license, committed radio enthusiasts, including many former KUSF volunteers and DJs, resolved to return to the airwaves.

After forming the non-profit San Francisco Community Radio, the group applied for a new low-power FM license at 102.5 FM on the crowded San Francisco radio dial.

Carolyn Keddy in KXSF(LP) studio, with film crew member in background.

San Francisco Community Radio — KXSF(LP) — and San Francisco Public Press — KSFP(LP) — emerged victorious and were granted construction permits for a timeshared facility in July, 2016. Two years later, KXSF(LP) was ready to launch, while KSFP(LP) was preparing for its debut scheduled for July 2019.

TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES

After tackling mounds of paperwork and engineering challenges, KXSF set its inaugural broadcast for Sept. 4 at high noon. As San Francisco’s weekly emergency siren blared at 12 p.m., eager listeners leaned in to a boombox at the station’s headquarters — and were met with static. Undeterred, the party and the programming carried on as technical experts sorted things out behind the scenes.

KXSF(LP) signage outside the studio.

KXSF engineer and board member Bill Ruck explains, “We had been checking and testing the transmitter for a couple of weeks, and we thought that we had exorcised the gremlins. Tuesday morning, I checked the transmitter around 10 a.m. and realized that there was no modulation.”

Fellow board member and KXSF’s IT expert Ted Dively did some troubleshooting, trying to get the audio working with the station’s Comrex BRIC-Link II.

Dively recounts, “In the moment, I was just trying to ‘make it go,’ and of course, I was disappointed, but I knew we’d figure it out. Working with the fine Sutro tower staff, we think the issue was radio frequency interference — RFI — causing our network gear in the cabinet to go sideways. One of the things I learned during this exercise is that Ethernet cables can act as antennae, which can create odd-to-diagnose connectivity issues.”

Carolyn Keddy celebrates the KXSF(LP) launch in the studio.

Within a week, on Sept. 10, KXSF was on the air at 102.5 FM. Regarding the fixes, Dively notes that, “Bill has reworked the wiring in our cabinet to better shield everything from free-floating RF, and so far, everything seems very stable.”

For now, KXSF is the sole station on 102.5 FM in San Francisco, airing its programming from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and from 10 p.m. to 4 a.m. every day. When San Francisco Public Press is ready to launch, its programming will run during the remaining hours. For now, the transmitter shuts off automatically during non-broadcast hours.

An unusual set-up, KXSF is operating at a miniscule 2 Watts of power due to the tricky, hill-filled San Francisco landscape. Ruck sought a central location in the city for the transmitter to reach as many listeners as possible, choosing Sutro Tower.

KXSF(LP) stickers at the launch party.

“The problem, though, was that the middle of San Francisco is higher than the edges due to Twin Peaks, Mt. Sutro, Mt. Davidson, etc., so even at the lowest height we could use at Sutro Tower, the second level, our ERP became 2 Watts,” Ruck clarifies.

UP AND RUNNING

A couple of weeks post-launch at another KXSF gathering, volunteers swapped tales of listening reports, chiming in with places where they had unexpectedly heard the station on FM and pointing out interference from a faraway broadcaster. As San Francisco Community Radio settles into its 102.5 FM home, it also runs programming online 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Carolyn Keddy in the studio.

San Francisco Community Radio secretary and board member Carolyn Keddy was a veteran KUSF DJ and began working on efforts to get back on the air starting in 2011.

Pleased to have reached this point, she shares, “I am looking forward to the sense of community we had with the old station. People do not really call into internet radio stations because you are usually listening at work in your cubicle or listening on your headphones while commuting. But people listen to the radio at home or in the car or outside, and if you get the urge to call, you can and do. I am looking forward to more requests and just hearing from more listeners.”

The current roster of around 30 shows includes a mix of adventurous music and talk programming, dual language shows, a kid-hosted music show and a radio theater program.

Vinyl spinning on a turntable at KXSF(LP).

Program Director/Executive Director Steve Zweig says, “Unique content is encouraged. For music shows, focusing on local music, new music and underground music is important — it’s our mission statement.”

Regarding San Francisco Community Radio’s long journey to FM, Keddy expressed her gratitude, reflecting, “I appreciate everything everyone has done to get us back on the air. There have been so many people, groups, bands, organizations and businesses over the years that have helped out that is hard to thank everyone in one shot, but I will every time I get the opportunity. Thank you San Francisco, and the world, for sticking by us and getting us here! Hurray for community radio!”

Jennifer Waits is a co-founder of Radio Survivor and a research associate on the Library of Congress’ Radio Preservation Task Force. She obsessively tours radio stations, which she chronicles on her blog Spinning Indie. A college radio DJ since the 1980s, she’s been at four stations and has hosted a music show at KFJC(FM) since 1999.

 

More Technical Details
From Engineer Bill Ruck:

“We are using a Comrex BRIC-Link II from the studios at Light Rail to Mt. Sutro via the internet. Our ISP at Light Rail is Sonic and at Sutro is Sutro Tower. There the BRIC-Link II audio is connected to a Nautel VS300 with Orban Inside. The VS300 then feeds an EMR isolator and two cavities to minimize potential issues with Intermodulation Distortion. The second level at Sutro Tower is where some of the auxiliary antennas are located, and we did not want to ever have IM problems. All of the equipment is located in a DDB weathertight cabinet on the second level of Sutro Tower. Our antenna is a Jampro JLLP-1.”

Author: Jennifer Waits
Posted: November 9, 2018, 5:30 pm
Let’s Toss Another Expensive and Useless Rule! Larry Langford started the debate saying that the seemingly obsolete NRSC mask measurement for AMs is a waste of time and resources. FCC-Required NRSC Proofs Are Important Broadcast engineer Burt Weiner disagrees with Larry Langford’s call to do away ...

Here is the updated collection of responses to Larry Langford’s suggestion that required NRSC measurements are no longer needed.

Let’s Toss Another Expensive and Useless Rule!

Larry Langford started the debate saying that the seemingly obsolete NRSC mask measurement for AMs is a waste of time and resources.

FCC-Required NRSC Proofs Are Important

Broadcast engineer Burt Weiner disagrees with Larry Langford’s call to do away with the annual NRSC proof requirement.

Keep AM NRSC Proofs and Add FM Proofs

Richard Rudman feels that NRSC proofs are still needed due to the fallibility of equipment and operators.

Larry’s Right! NRSC Measurements Are Unneeded

Cumulus Media broadcast engineer Ray Uberecken also thinks that the NRSC measurements are outmoded.

Annual Measurement Checks Are Still Important — Really

Steve Johnston notes that the FCC rules call for annual harmonic and spurious measurements for AM stations, but he also wants the same rules applied to FMs.

Why the Fuss Over AM Proofs?

One technology supplier says we’re holding onto the past for no good reason.

Author: RW Staff
Posted: November 9, 2018, 5:29 pm
Radio World has had quite a strong response from readers with perspectives about Larry Langford's comments on removing AM proof requirements. Here's another from a prominent radio equipment manufacturer who asked not to be named because he was speaking just for himself rather than his organization: ...

One technology supplier says we’re holding onto the past for no good reason

Radio World has had quite a strong response from readers with perspectives about Larry Langford's comments on removing AM proof requirements. Here's another from a prominent radio equipment manufacturer who asked not to be named because he was speaking just for himself rather than his organization:

I appreciate the comments from other engineers talking about why it is important, however the missing point seems to be that the FCC does not require these measurements for FM or TV transmitters. All contemporary AM, FM and TV transmitters are equally reliable, and the likelihood of out-of-band emissions is very low. Why do these engineers imagine AM is so unstable to require yearly check? Factually, out-of-band emissions from FM transmitters or digital TV transmitters, while still remote, have a much higher probability of impacting some operations that people care about: mobile phone systems. Even in cases where mobile carriers complain about out-of-band emissions, typically the FM or TV station is well within their specification requirements; mobile operators have such sensitive receivers that they are trying to operate much beyond the norms of broadcasting.

In any event, it seems like holding onto the past for no good reason.

What are your own thoughts? Email radioworld@futurenet.com with "Letter to the Editor" in the subject field.

Here is an aggregation page for this topic.

Author: RW Staff
Posted: November 9, 2018, 5:14 pm
Targetspot, part of AudioValley, will unveil an all-in global podcast ad marketplace across North America and Europe. “The main objective of the Targetspot Podcast Marketplace is to provide the greatest exposure and easiest monetization solution to all podcast producers looking to capitalize on the ...

Aims to provide wider exposure and simplify monetization for podcast producers

Targetspot, part of AudioValley, will unveil an all-in global podcast ad marketplace across North America and Europe.

“The main objective of the Targetspot Podcast Marketplace is to provide the greatest exposure and easiest monetization solution to all podcast producers looking to capitalize on the interest of advertisers in the rising medium of audio on demand,” said Laurane Delcroix, Targetspot S.V.P. North America.

Podcast Marketplace is based on the firm’s proprietary technology including Shoutcast, Winamp and Targetspot passport. 

The company explains that the global platform will allow “advertisers and agencies to buy programmatically pre-roll and instream through the connection of the marketplace with all major Demand Side Platform’s and through direct buys including tailored creative solutions via the Targetspot dedicated teams and offices.”

[Read: Podcasting Provides Money-Making Options]

Podcast Marketplace will be available at the beginning of December to existing Targetspot premium publishers and partners, and in the Spring to all other users.

Author: Marguerite Clark
Posted: November 9, 2018, 1:46 pm
Radiodays Europe has announced it will hold the third edition of Podcast Day in London on Thursday June 13. After having launched three years ago, Podcast Day 2019 is changing cities from its original Copenhagen location.  London is an important center for the Podcast market where, the ...

Registration for the third edition opening soon

Radiodays Europe has announced it will hold the third edition of Podcast Day in London on Thursday June 13.

After having launched three years ago, Podcast Day 2019 is changing cities from its original Copenhagen location. 

London is an important center for the Podcast market where, the organizers say, the podcast scene is more mature, with both independent podcasters and traditional broadcasters producing podcasts that are captivating new audiences.

[Read: Podcasting Provides Money-Making Options]

Registration for Podcast Day by Radiodays Europe will open later in 2018.

Author: Marguerite Clark
Posted: November 9, 2018, 9:50 am
Even as the final results of Tuesday’s 2018 Midterm Elections are still being tallied, pundits and lobbyists are looking into their crystal balls to divine what may be in the United States’ future now that the House of Representatives is controlled by a Democratic majority and the Republicans ...

Now that (most of) the results are in, it’s time to prepare for the road ahead

Even as the final results of Tuesday’s 2018 Midterm Elections are still being tallied, pundits and lobbyists are looking into their crystal balls to divine what may be in the United States’ future now that the House of Representatives is controlled by a Democratic majority and the Republicans maintained their majority in the Senate.

Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP is among those, and the international law firm has shared its predictions for the policy priorities of the incoming 116th Congress in a document they shared with clients Wednesday.

The following highlights touch on issues of interest to broadcasters.

It should be no surprise that Pillsbury expects “Democratic leaders in the House will act quickly to increase and intensify their use of Congressional investigative powers.” Broadcasters should take note that Congressman Frank Pallone (D-NJ) will likely head the House Energy and Commerce Committee, and his agenda is predicted to include investigations of broadcast companies, among other oversight activities.

Those in the know anticipate the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee will be led by Congressman Elijah Cummings (D-Maryland), the committee’s highest-ranking Democrat. He’s on the record expressing interest “in investigating the Trump Administration’s response to Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico,” and since the telecommunications infrastructure in the U.S. territory was badly damaged, broadcasters are among the many who have struggled to return to normalcy and have blamed the federal response in no small part.

However, not every issue will be a battle of wills between the House, Senate and Trump administration.

Bipartisan cooperation is forecasted for the Ways & Means Committee and the Transportation & Infrastructure Committee.

For example, predicted Transportation & Infrastructure Committee Chairman Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.) is in favor of infrastructure spending, especially for improvements to “critical infrastructure” — which includes telecommunications, and therefore, radio and television broadcasting.

Democrats’ infrastructure plan also emphasizes “improving and modernizing aging energy infrastructure, shoring up grid reliability, expanding renewable energy, and promoting energy efficiency programs,” which Pillsbury says should be agreeable to bipartisan legislators. Likely House E&C Committee Chairman Pallone will also use this as an opportunity to advocate for “renewables and energy efficiency programs” as part of these improvements.

Another area of potential agreement is cybersecurity, which will also likely be on the agenda for many state legislative bodies. Specifically, the new Congress will likely tackle rules for “Internet of Things” devices, although Pillsbury says it’s unclear whether the House and Senate would agree on such security legislation.

Also, the passage of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency Act, which President Trump is expected to sign, means that “the White House that would appoint the Department of Homeland Security to stand up a dedicated agency to be the government’s main civilian cyber authority.” However, Pillsbury notes that the new agency will need funding and oversight as it works to take “over core federal responsibilities to combat cyber threats.”

Once it’s up-and-running, the new cybersecurity agency would likely focus on “supply chain” security and also push for the development and implementation of National Institute of Standards and Technology cybersecurity best practices. It also wouldn’t be alone in these efforts; states including California, Arizona, Colorado and Virginia have already passed “legislation aimed at data security and security practice requirements,” and Pillsbury predicts other states will soon follow suit.

Broadcaster shouldn’t expect a lot of movement in legislation related to the Federal Aviation Administration any time soon, since President Trump signed the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018 last month, securing funding and authorization through 2023.

Note that some leadership positions in the House of Representatives and the Senate are still up in the air.

With Congressman Bill Shuster (R-Pa.)’s retirement, the new Republican ranking member of the House Transportation Committee will either be Congressman Jeff Denham (R-Calif.) or Congressman Sam Graves (R-Mo.); however, Graves has more seniority over Denham, Pillsbury notes.

And even though the Senate majority has note changed, leadership shifts are expected. Pillsbury says current Senate Commerce Committee Chair Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.) is projected to become majority whip, which leaves the committee chair seat vacant. Sen. Roger Wicker (R-Miss.) is predicted to take over as chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, but he currently chairs the telecommunications subcommittee and hasn’t signaled “a specific agenda for transportation and aviation-related matters.”

Another sticky wicket for Senate Commerce is the to-be-determined fate of Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.), who is currently the ranking member but may not survive a recount against Florida Gov. Rick Scott for the seat. If Nelson doesn’t return, then Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.) is next in line in seniority for Commerce — but she is current ranking member of the Energy Committee. If Cantwell demurs, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) would be next in line for the role.

The midterms also caused some shake ups in state government control. Nonetheless, Pillsbury expects Republicans will continue their quest for “‘right size’ regulations governing occupational licenses,” and the firm believes many Democrats will agree with the goal because “burdensome occupational licensing requirements” can set too high of a bar for many to enter certain fields. Legislators will work to “reform occupational licensing requirements” while allowing private, voluntary certifications as valid. (Pillsbury likely highlighted this issue because the firm serves as counsel to the Professional Certification Coalition, which aims to ensure that protection of private certification.)

Read the full document online here.

Author: Emily M. Reigart
Posted: November 8, 2018, 8:39 pm
Drones are here to stay. And that’s exciting news for the head of the National Association of Tower Erectors, who sees a bright future in terms of new applications and refined safety regulations surrounding the use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS). Radio World spoke with Todd Schlekeway, executive ...

Recent FAA Authorization brings welcome changes, says head of tower organization

Drones are here to stay. And that’s exciting news for the head of the National Association of Tower Erectors, who sees a bright future in terms of new applications and refined safety regulations surrounding the use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS). Radio World spoke with Todd Schlekeway, executive director of NATE, about the organization’s connection to the Commercial Drone Alliance, his takeaway on the provisions in the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018, and how drones are being put to use as broadcasters deal with tall tower work due to the repack.

Radio World: What is your organization’s take on the usage of drones in the broadcast tower space?

Todd Schlekeway: NATE has been an enthusiastic supporter of expanding commercial UASes for some time. We joined the Commercial Drone Alliance [an organization committed to growing the commercial drone industry] about a year and a half ago. It’s clear that our industry could be benefactors [of legislation surrounding drones] over the long term.

[Read: Tweak of Tower Marking Language Moves Forward]

Radio World: What specifically were you pleased to see implemented specific in the recent FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018?

Schlekeway: The key areas we were interested in [seeing implanting] were more flexibility with the waiver process, remote identification, and changes to tower marking.

One of the highlights is that [the act] expands and makes the waiver process streamlined and easier to use. Previously, unless you are an organization or company with a waiver to fly at night, beyond visual line-of-sight or over people, you had to file [a waiver] and that process took a long time. This FAA Reauthorization Act will set in motion a streamlined approach [to getting waivers approved].

From the commercial UAS perspective, we were very happy to see [the removal] of a clause from the previous authorization that essentially exempted hobbyist users from any remote identification. So this act is going to set forth a [procedure by which] all users are going to have to have remote ID.

This is significant because any time there is a registered drone, there will be accountability. Accountability breeds safety. That’s significant. The hobbyist community is very passionate about drones.

There’s also a provision impacting the previous tower marking mandate that was part of a short-term extension in 2016 [that] mandated that all towers between 50 feet and 199 feet be marked. Of course those towers over 200 feet are already lit and marked.

We fought hard against that; we don’t have the work force to retroactively [mark those towers]. It was one of those things that went too far by sweeping in communication towers. The 2018 act walked that mandate back. Now, those towers just need to be entered into a database.

Radio World: What kinds of reports are you getting from tower companies about how broadcasters are using drones?

Schlekeway: I reached out to two prominent broadcast contractors that are heavily involved with the repack and both had said they were using drones extensively with their tall tower work — specifically related to the repack. It’s just a different animal from a technical and engineering point of view. Technicians need to have a different skill set. This is a really specialized skill that not every company is capability of doing.

Some of the use cases [these contractors] were using UASes for were for complex construction such as rigging candelabras. Or using them to monitor their equipment with video and photo footage to look at structural analysis. Drones are useful to determine a lot of rigging obstructions, going to spots technicians can’t get to. There’s no question [drones] are playing a role.

Radio World: What else should radio and TV facility managers know?

Schlekeway: The broadcast industry needs to stay attuned to the evolving regulatory landscape. It’s about to get more flexible but you have stay up to date on the regulatory side of the house.

Use of these drones is going to continue to increase year over year. But there’s now a higher level of training needed. At a recent UAS summit, reps from several industries said “if we’re going to go allow your contractor on our site, your guy better be trained higher than just the baseline.” There’s a need for graduated training requirements.

Radio World: What are your thoughts on the future role that drones will play in our industry?

Schlekeway: We are “all in” on what they can do for the broadcast side and for cellular sites. But they not a replacement for the workplace. [They are] a powerful supplemental tool for the team to work safely and more efficiently and to streamline their work process.

Drones are here to stay. As use cases continue to evolve, stay attuned to the regulatory landscape.

Radio World: It’s a time of immense change for the industry.

Schlekeway: It’s exciting to see. I envision the day when every contractor company has a drone as a part of their operation, as a part of their toolkit. We’re not too far from that reality.

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Author: Susan Ashworth
Posted: November 8, 2018, 7:00 pm
In an ongoing bid to reach an increasingly segmented audience, iHeartRadio introduced a new subscription service that offers access to live radio and unlimited audio streaming to multiple users in a single plan. The program, called iHeart All Access Family Plan, offers five users in a single plan ...

On-demand and multiple user capability features introduced

In an ongoing bid to reach an increasingly segmented audience, iHeartRadio introduced a new subscription service that offers access to live radio and unlimited audio streaming to multiple users in a single plan.

The program, called iHeart All Access Family Plan, offers five users in a single plan access to live radio, personalized radio stations, and the ability to play songs on demand. The program is an upgrade from the company’s previous high-end service, iHeartRadio Plus. The new program now allows for song skips, allows users to create custom playlists and download music and listen offline.

According to iHeart, the new family music subscription service is the first with demand functionality with the goal of making “radio truly interactive,” the company said.

Under the program, users can search from a library of millions of tracks and listen to personalized playlists and customized stations with unlimited skips. The new program will also allow users to save songs directly from a radio program as well as to access a library of podcasts.

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Author: Susan Ashworth
Posted: November 8, 2018, 6:18 pm
For as long as there has been broadcasting, the North American nations of Canada, the United States and Mexico have closely guarded their domestic radio and, later, television, industries. The U.S. Federal Communications Commission would not permit a licensee to have more than 25 percent foreign ...

The cultural industries exemption was one of many hot potatoes during negotiations

For as long as there has been broadcasting, the North American nations of Canada, the United States and Mexico have closely guarded their domestic radio and, later, television, industries.

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission would not permit a licensee to have more than 25 percent foreign ownership, while Canada and Mexico forbid non-citizens from owning a broadcasting station. Recent changes in these rules could have a major effect in the U.S. and Mexico. However, it does not appear that change is on the horizon in Canada, and that could have made it difficult to negotiate a three-nation free trade agreement.

Students of broadcast history will remember the “Border Blasters” — high-powered AM stations along the Mexican line that carried programming for an American audience.

Dr. John Brinkley used his 500,000-watt station across the Rio Grande from Del Rio, Texas, to promote his male rejuvenation surgery using goat glands. While his broadcast operation was outside the FCC’s jurisdiction, the commission found a way to act against him. While running for office in Kansas, Brinkley would continue to do his talk shows via a broadcast loop. The commission instituted the “Brinkley Rule,” or Section 325c, which prohibits sending a program destined for U.S. listeners to a transmitter in another country without FCC authorization. Years later, Wolfman Jack used XERB in Tijuana to serve African-American listeners in Los Angeles.

The “X” stations in San Diego that operate in English from American studios are owned by Mexican companies and leased to U.S. operators. They all have section 325c permits from the FCC’s International Bureau. These arrangements could be in for a major change.

Mexico’s 2014 Telecommunications and Broadcasting Law allowed foreign interests to own up to 49 percent of a radio or television station. However, that percentage can increase to the amount of Mexican ownership permitted in the purchaser’s country. In 2016, the FCC changed its rules to allow 100-percent foreign ownership after a detailed review. Therefore, an American concern can now own a Mexican broadcaster outright, and a Mexican firm could take total ownership of an American broadcaster.

Across the northern border, Canada’s 1968 Broadcasting Act involved much more than foreign ownership restrictions. Canadian music stations must play a minimum amount of songs that meet two of four criteria that measure Canadian production. These Canadian content, or CanCon, rules are cited as one of the reasons CKLW in Windsor went from one of the most listened-to radio stations in the U.S. to oblivion. They are also subject to an involuntary assessment to help produce that music.

Cultural industries, including broadcasting, were exempted from both NAFTA and the U.S.-Canada free trade deal that preceded it. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has warned that he will stand against any change in that exemption, fearing that American broadcasters may buy Canadian stations.

The second purchase agreement approved by the FCC under these new rules was the buying of two radio stations by Mexican investors. But the approval by Mexican regulators of the sale of a legendary border blaster to an American interest has drawn attention on Capitol Hill. Mexican authorities have approved the sale of XEWW (formerly XETRA) in Tijuana to an American interest. The new owners plan to provide programs for the Chinese-American audience in southern California from studios near Los Angeles. A Section 325c application has been filed to program the station from a U.S. location. The operators of KQEV, a suburban Los Angeles LPFM serving a Chinese audience, have filed a petition to deny that application. The first of two reasons given for the petition was XEWW’s potential negative effect on their listenership.

It is not often that a U.S. senator pays attention to a foreign radio station. In 1982, Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.) mentioned the U.S. revenue of CKLW in a floor speech criticizing a Canadian decision to remove the tax deductibility of advertising on non-Canadian stations.

In September, Sens. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Ted Cruz (R-Texas) announced their opposition to XEWW’s proposed operation. They were concerned with the second reason in KQEV’s petition. The Washington Free Beacon reported that XEWW’s owners would rely on a programs produced by a Chinese firm called Phoenix TV that reportedly has ties to the Chinese Communist Party.

The cultural industries exemption is just one concern was mentioned frequently as American and Canadian negotiators try to hammer out a new trilateral trade agreement. Mexico has agreed to make the kind of changes in its broadcast ownership rules that it appears would be difficult to find approval for in Ottawa. The XEWW sale shows once again that radio along the border provides a continuing source of intrigue.

Kevin Curran is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Oklahoma studying cross-border targeted radio in North America. He is also a faculty associate at Arizona State University’s College of Integrative Sciences and Arts. He has held a variety of positions in radio news, sales and management. Reach him at kevin_curran@ou.edu.

Author: Kevin Curran
Posted: November 8, 2018, 5:30 pm
LARGO, Fla. — Nov. 8, 2018 — Just Add Power (J+P), a leader in Ultra HD-over-IP video distribution, announced the release of its new 709P2P 3G Point-to-Point Transmitter. The Power-Over-Ethernet (PoE) transmitter allows integrators to utilize a single power input to distribute video, audio, power, ...

Just Add Power (J+P), a leader in Ultra HD-over-IP video distribution, announced the release of its new 709P2P 3G Point-to-Point Transmitter. The Power-Over-Ethernet (PoE) transmitter allows integrators to utilize a single power input to distribute video, audio, power, and control to all downstream devices over Cat-5e cable. Integrators can pair the 709P2P with any model of J+P receiver to create a simple point-to-point connection or combine it with the company's PoE daisy-chain receiver for installations of up to four screens.

LARGO, Fla. — Nov. 8, 2018 — Just Add Power (J+P), a leader in Ultra HD-over-IP video distribution, announced the release of its new 709P2P 3G Point-to-Point Transmitter. The Power-Over-Ethernet (PoE) transmitter allows integrators to utilize a single power input to distribute video, audio, power, and control to all downstream devices over Cat-5e cable. Integrators can pair the 709P2P with any model of J+P receiver to create a simple point-to-point connection or combine it with the company's PoE daisy-chain receiver for installations of up to four screens.

"When we introduced our PoE 3G receiver earlier this year, we provided our integrators with a way to customize their 4K projects while increasing installation efficiency and affordability," said Taft Stricklin, sales team manager at Just Add Power. "This transmitter further expands our PoE offering, giving our customers even more flexibility. Now they can shoot power, video, control, and superior audio over Cat-5e without any additional labor or Wi-Fi. And because it integrates with the rest of the J+P 3G family, they don't have to rip and replace when clients upgrade or expand their AV system."

The new J+P 709P2P 3G Point-to-Point PoE transmitter distributes Ultra HD and 4K video with HDCP 2.2 a single Cat-5e cable. It also supports all lossless audio formats, including Dolby Atmos, and control endpoints with RS-232 and IR (using J+P's VBS-HDMI-IRD RS-232 to IR converter). The 40W PoE injector can power up to four receivers, eliminating additional cabling and power infrastructure. Video image capabilities include push, pull, and pop for onscreen customization. As with all models in the J+P lineup, the 2GΩ/3G+ PoE solutions integrate seamlessly with both 2G and 3G, allowing integrators to build a future-proof infrastructure that suits any application requirement.

For more information visit www.justaddpower.com.

# # #

About Just Add Power (J+P) 

Just Add Power (J+P) was founded in 1992 by a group of former employees from the IBM Corporation. The motivation behind the company and the name was to come to the market with applications that totally support customers, their investment, and are easy to use. With the 2009 introduction of the HDIP™ solution for distributing HDMI® over IP networks, the company has become well known across many new markets.

The J+P design and manufacturing philosophy is evolutionary, not revolutionary. For example, customers who invested in our solution in 2009 can still purchase new transmitters and receivers today to expand and maintain their system. J+P takes pride in having created an infrastructure that can be sustained and manufactured reliably for many years, making improvements through free firmware updates. When the company adds features that can't be done through firmware alone, it builds new hardware with an eye towards backwards compatibility. The J+P evolutionary product design philosophy ensures the protection of the customers' investment and increases system value over time.

PR Link: www.ingearpr.com/J+P/181108J+P.docx

Link to Photos:www.ingearpr.com/J+P/J+P_709P2P.png

Image Caption: 709P2P 3G Point-to-Point Transmitter

All trademarks and registered trademarks mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners.

Share it on Twitter:https://twitter.com/intent/tweet?text=The%20709P2P%20transmitter%20from%20@justaddpowerHD%20allows%20integrators%20to%20utilize%20a%20single%20power%20input%20to%20distribute%20video,%20audio,%20power,%20and%20control%20to%20all%20downstream%20devices%20over%20Cat-5e%20cable.%20%23AVTweeps%20%23AVoverIP%20-%20http://bit.ly/2OxA38n

 

Follow Just Add Power:

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Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: November 8, 2018, 3:28 pm
Digital Radio continues its evolution. Whether it is the HD Radio, Digital Radio Mondiale or DAB standard, each technology has made notable advances in various regions of the world. The latest Radio World International eBook, Global Digital Radio 2018, delves deep into the details of this progress, ...

A new eBook from Radio World International

Digital Radio continues its evolution. Whether it is the HD Radio, Digital Radio Mondiale or DAB standard, each technology has made notable advances in various regions of the world.

The latest Radio World International eBook, Global Digital Radio 2018, delves deep into the details of this progress, exploring such topics as DAB+ status worldwide; digital radio in the car; IP and hybrid radio; and lessons learned from the digital rollout in Norway.

It also offers insight into the specifics of DRM trials that recently took place in South Africa; DRM updates from India; HD Radio in the United States, Mexico and Canada; and more.

Learn more in the latest free Radio World International eBook. Read it free now — click here!

Author: RW Staff
Posted: November 8, 2018, 12:30 pm
In September Belgium welcomed the launch of Roxx, a new DAB+ station for the Flemish region. Read about the strategy and technical setup behind the area’s first broad “rock” format and more in the November issue of Radio World International. AWARDS Best of Show Award Winners at IBC Discover who ...

Read about how a station in Malawi is helping refugees; the strategy of Belgium’s Roxx with its unique rock format; and more

In September Belgium welcomed the launch of Roxx, a new DAB+ station for the Flemish region. Read about the strategy and technical setup behind the area’s first broad “rock” format and more in the November issue of Radio World International.

AWARDS

Best of Show Award Winners at IBC

Discover who took home a BOS Award from IBC2018.

MALAWI

UNHCR Reaches Refugees

The station aims to improve coexistence between the refugee and host communities.

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE:

Author: RW Staff
Posted: November 8, 2018, 10:40 am
NEWBURY PARK, Calif., Nov. 7, 2018 - Platinum Tools (www.platinumtools.com), the leader in solutions for the preparation, installation, hand termination and testing of wire and cable, is proud to announce the launch of the new shielded and unshielded Unloaded Patch Panel line. The new 24- and ...

NEWBURY PARK, Calif., Nov. 7, 2018 - Platinum Tools (www.platinumtools.com), the leader in solutions for the preparation, installation, hand termination and testing of wire and cable, is proud to announce the launch of the new shielded and unshielded Unloaded Patch Panel line. The new 24- and 48-port line is now available.

“Platinum Tools is known as a leader in providing products and solutions for the structured wiring networking world of data, voice, and video,” said Lee Sachs, Platinum Tools, Inc. president and general manager. “Our Unloaded Patch Panels make media integration easy, flexible, and field-configurable by populating the ports as needed.”

The Unloaded Patch Panels make it easy to mix and match keystones, replace a damaged port, and add new runs. They also make category upgrades easy, maximize limited rack space, and are perfect for broadcast, residential, or small office applications.

Unloaded Patch Panel 24 Port (p/n 641-24U):

· Unshielded

· 24 port, 1U, UTP, 19 in.

· MSRP: $25.25

Unloaded Patch Panel 24 Port (p/n 642-24SU):

· Shielded

· 24 port, 1U, STP, 19 in.

· MSRP: $32.15

Unloaded Patch Panel 48 Port (p/n 643-48U):

· Unshielded

· 48 port, 2U, UTP, 19 in.

· MSRP: $47.95

Unloaded Patch Panel 48 Port (p/n 644-48SU):

· Shielded

· 48 port, 2U, STP, 19 in.

· MSRP: $57.85

Additional features include:

· For use with RJ45 Ethernet, HDMI audio/video, voice, USB, and other applications

· Ports are numbered for easy connection identification

· Write-on labels with protective covers

· Mounts into 1U/2U of EIA-standard 19 in. 2-post rack or wall-mount rack enclosure

· Support and management bar is removable and includes cable zip ties to secure cables

For additional pricing and more information on Platinum Tools and its complete product line, please visit www.platinumtools.com, call (800) 749-5783, or email info@platinumtools.com.

Platinum Tools, founded in 1997, was created based upon two very simple objectives. First, develop the absolute best possible solutions for the preparation, installation, and hand termination of wire and cable. Second, implement an operational infrastructure that can deliver these products in an efficient, timely, and high quality manner.

All of our products must absolutely satisfy three critical benchmark criteria…utility of function; quality of function; and economic value. Our people are our company. They, too, must be focused on and work to satisfy three critical benchmark criteria…customer satisfaction; product knowledge and expertise; and willingness to learn and adapt.

# # #

Author: CRL Public Relations
Posted: November 7, 2018, 8:17 pm
WASHINGTON — Delivering a quality “metadata” experience (for example, song title, artist and album artwork for FM broadcasters) to the digital dashboard is more critical than ever for broadcasters. Now, a new collaboration between the National Association of Broadcasters and the Consumer Technology ...

Also consolidates the European RDS and North American RBDS standards

WASHINGTON — Delivering a quality “metadata” experience (for example, song title, artist and album artwork for FM broadcasters) to the digital dashboard is more critical than ever for broadcasters. Now, a new collaboration between the National Association of Broadcasters and the Consumer Technology Association aims to provide a better framework to support the data delivery needs of radio broadcasters.

The National Radio Systems Committee, a technical standards-setting body cosponsored by NAB and CTA, has launched the Data Services and Metadata Subcommittee. The new subcommittee, successor to the NRSC’s Radio Broadcast Data Systems subcommittee, is chaired by Dan Mansergh, chief technology officer for KQED Inc.

The RDS communications protocol, which allows FM radio stations to incorporate inaudible signals into their broadcasts on a 57 kHz subcarrier, was introduced in the U.S. in 1993 to add data capability but also with hopes to eventually increase revenues through non-traditional services. Since then, radio frequency subcarrier usage and wireless data distribution has grown in this country, observers say. CTA does not track how many vehicles on the road in this country have RDS capability, but it has become commonplace on newer vehicles.

One area the group plans to explore is data broadcasting applications associated with Emergency Alerts, with the goal of helping broadcast engineers understand and deploy the best alerting infrastructure possible, according to a press release.

With the creation of the new committee also comes the consolidation of the European RDS and North American RBDS Standards, according to the NRSC.

Radio World interviewed Mansergh, NAB Vice President of Advanced Engineering David Layer and CTA Senior Director of Technology and Standards Mike Bergman about the new subcommittee and what brought about the need for the change. Their emailed replies to our questions follow.

Radio World: Why the change in subcommittees at this point, and how long has it been in discussion?
David Layer: In 2016, the NRSC and the RDS Forum (the group which manages the European version of the RDS Standard) agreed to incorporate the provisions of the NRSC-4 Standard (originally adopted as the RBDS Standard) unique to North America into the IEC version of the RDS Standard (IEC 62106).

The NRSC has been managing the U.S. version of RDS, referred to as the RBDS Standard. The RDS Forum manages the European equivalent, and there were relatively few differences between the two standards. This consolidation of the European RDS and North American RBDS standards is a long-discussed goal and has the advantage of making all RDS/RBDS information available in a single document.

One reason that the NRSC and RDS Forum were discussing this possibility at this time is that the RDS Forum has been undertaking a significant updating and revising of IEC 62106, partly to add RDS2 to that standard. As part of this revision, the RDS standard document was split into seven separate parts, and it became clear that it would be a straightforward matter to create an additional part containing the provisions specific to North America.

Based upon this plan, the NRSC and RDS Forum worked together to create the North America-specific “Part 7” of the updated IEC 62106, and in April 2018 the RBDS Subcommittee adopted this Part 7 document and authorized its incorporation into the IEC Standard. Note that until final adoption of the IEC document by the IEC, the current NRSC-4 Standard remains in effect.

Further, broadcasters have been implementing other methods for transmitting station, artist, title and other information with the audio program, in addition to RDS. First, HD Radio with its own rich metadata capabilities, and then internet streaming, came along to supplement the broadcaster toolkit. Consequently, the work in the RBDS Subcommittee has been increasingly broadened beyond the RDS transport.

Given that the NRSC’s version of the RDS Standard will soon be retired, it was an opportune time to consider re-naming and re-chartering the RBDS Subcommittee as the Data Services and Metadata Subcommittee.

RW: So the RBDS subcommittee is gone, but do all RBDS subcommittee standards and guidelines for RDS in this country remain in place?
Layer: All of the documents that fell within the purview of the RBDS Subcommittee will now fall within the purview of the DSM Subcommittee. The only document that will be retired is the NRSC-4 Standard, and that will happen when the updated version of IEC-62106 is given final approval (expected to occur by the end of 2018).

RW: What will be the focus of the DSM subcommittee?
Dan Mansergh: The DSM subcommittee will focus on the digital information that radio broadcasters send to their audiences via various data transmission technologies in use today. Like its predecessor, it is a technical body that will develop guidelines and standards related to these services and technologies.

RW: You say in the joint press release announcing the changes that “more methods are deployed to transmit data beyond RDS.” What other methods are you talking about?
Mansergh: Since the introduction of RDS, there have been two principal additional methods employed to transmit data to radio receivers: digital radio (HD Radio in North America, with other technologies in use elsewhere) and hybrid radio (over-the-air plus internet protocol). The DSM subcommittee will consider these methods of data transmission and others that evolve over time.

Note that regarding HD Radio, while the DSM subcommittee may consider data services and metadata over HD Radio signals, the DRB subcommittee will continue to have purview over the NRSC-5 standard as well as HD Radio developments pertaining to the transmission of digital radio signals.

RW: Beyond the predictable broadcasting song title, artist information, station IDs, what types of things are radio stations doing with their RDS displays? For example, alarms, notifications, commercial messaging, couponing and EAS.
Mike Bergman: Data transmission over RDS is expected to focus on basic information like station information, song title and artist and program service (including genre). There are more capabilities in the RDS technology suite, but these are the most popular with broadcasters and the ones best supported by hardware.

In addition, one of the most important bits of information sent over RDS is the program information code, since this is used to help identify a radio signal’s internet information (using RadioDNS), which is used in hybrid radio receiver implementations.

RW: How do you envision data delivery for radio broadcasters could change in the next decade?
Bergman: Using hybrid radio technology, one of the main improvements to terrestrial radio services will revolve around the use of interactivity with listeners. Radio has always been primarily a one-way medium, but by bringing internet connectivity to receivers, listeners will have many more opportunities to interact with radio stations.

Likewise, radio stations will have an opportunity to know more about their listeners, not just who they are but where they are, and by knowing this will have the ability to better target content and advertising that is highly relevant.

RW: How does DSM’s work figure to impact the NAB’s efforts to collaborate with automakers on the digital dashboard of the future?
Layer: NAB’s auto initiative does not presently intersect with the work of the NRSC.

RW: Is it possible DSM’s work will have ties to any autonomous vehicle development by automakers?
Layer: The DSM subcommittee is not likely to focus on a project strictly related to autonomous vehicle development in the near future.

RW: How many members make up the DSM subcommittee?
Mansergh: You can find a list of DSM subcommittee members here: www.nrscstandards.org/committees/dsm/dsm-member-list.pdf.

The members of the RBDS Subcommittee are generally supportive of the change and look forward to continuing their work and expanding to new areas of interest within the expanded scope of the new DSM Subcommittee.

RW: How often will the DSM subcommittee meet?
Mansergh: The subcommittee meets at least three times a year — at CES in January, at the NAB Show in April, and at the Radio Show in September. These are all face-to-face meetings; electronic meetings are scheduled when needed. The DSM subcommittee will establish working groups to do detailed work on specific categories, and these working groups will typically meet once per month, or more or less often as required by current activities.

RW: Describe NAB’s relationship with CTA and the importance of the two organizations continuing to work together on radio technical issues going forward.
Layer: NAB and CTA have a long and productive relationship working together as sponsors of the NRSC. Terrestrial radio is a system, with the broadcast/transmission side and the consumer receiver side as integral and non-separable parts. Both organizations recognize this and will continue to work together for the betterment and constant improvement of terrestrial radio services.

Author: Randy J. Stine
Posted: November 7, 2018, 5:30 pm
Michael LeClair chronicles his impressions of Blackloud's AF-1, which (finally!) lets iPhone users listen to local FM radio conveniently. Also, tour American General Media's Bakersfield, Calif., facility alongside Doug Irwin. Inovonics and Radio World also salute Ben Barber for reaching an industry ...

Learn about Blackloud's AF-1, tour American General Media's Bakersfield, Calif., and more

Michael LeClair chronicles his impressions of Blackloud's AF-1, which (finally!) lets iPhone users listen to local FM radio conveniently. Also, tour American General Media's Bakersfield, Calif., facility alongside Doug Irwin. Inovonics and Radio World also salute Ben Barber for reaching an industry milestone. Paul Kaminski test drives the Volvo XC60 T8-E — another model with no AM radio receiver. And if you need a pick-me-up, celebrate the launch of KXSF(LP).

METADATA
New Radio Data Service Subcommittee Launched

Delivering a quality “metadata” experience (for example, song title, artist and album artwork for FM broadcasters) to the digital dashboard is more important than ever for broadcasters. Now, a new collaboration between the National Association of Broadcasters and the Consumer Technology Association aims to provide a better framework to support the data delivery needs of radio broadcasters.

21ST CENTURY PD
Making Local Radio That Isn’t

It's been a year now since the FCC regulation known as the Main Studio Rule was abolished. Local radio stations are no longer required to operate a studio and have a physical presence within the city-grade signal contour of their official city of license. But as one legal expert cautions, stations still need to address issues of importance to their community in their programming and maintain a toll-free phone line answered during business hours. How and why are broadcasters choosing to use their newfound freedom.

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE:

Author: RW Staff
Posted: November 7, 2018, 3:58 pm
BERLIN — Nearly 95 years after the debut of regular radio broadcasts in Germany on Oct. 29, 1923 through a medium wave transmitter in Berlin, various present-day radio industry specialists gathered in Berlin to attend the WorldDAB General Assembly. More than 200 delegates from all over the world ...

Radio Industry discusses a multiplatform strategy to compete in an IP-dominated world

BERLIN — Nearly 95 years after the debut of regular radio broadcasts in Germany on Oct. 29, 1923 through a medium wave transmitter in Berlin, various present-day radio industry specialists gathered in Berlin to attend the WorldDAB General Assembly. More than 200 delegates from all over the world discussed the future of DAB+ as well as multiplatform digital radio.

Patrick Hannon, WorldDAB president, addresses the audience.

The general consensus during the event is that the radio industry would benefit from a mixed approach, where traditional broadcast distribution still is the backbone. Patrick Hannon, WorldDAB President, said: “The future of radio is digital and multiplatform, but DAB provides the essential foundation. Collaboration is key to success.”

AUDIO RENAISSANCE

Session speakers highlighted how radio consumption is continuously morphing: the traditional broadcast model is still key, but “we are experiencing a global renaissance of audio,” explained Joan Warner, CEO of Commercial Radio Australia, “thanks to a dramatic, technology driven change.”

New players such as smart speakers introduced by Amazon and Google have opened new audio listening models, so “we have to be everywhere people consumes audio,” Warner said.

Jan Lorbach of GFK analyzes the selling trends of digital radio receivers. All Photos: Davide Moro

According to GFK data, after years of strong growth, in 2018 the selling figures of digital radio receivers in Europe plus Australia are declining, but those figures also reflect the completion of the digital switchover in Norway.

“Excluding Norway, the selling figures of the remaining markets are still positive (+3.6 percent Jan. to Aug. 2018 as compared to 2017), but the DAB market is challenged by saturation and also by new technologies thriving into the market,” said Jan Lorbach, senior market insights manager at GFK.

[Related: Radioplayer Presents Reference Radio for Dashboards]

GFK data shows that in the United Kingdom smart speakers now accounts for over a fifth of the digital audio market. This data doesn’t include direct sales, so the figures are most likely even higher.

Audience attending the WorldDAB General Assembly. On the stage (L to R): Graham Dixon, EBU; Jan Lorbach, GFK; Anthony Sethill, Frontier Smart Technologies; Michael Hill, Radioplayer UK; and Joan Warner, Commercial Radio Australia.

Music streaming platforms together with the rising availability of in-dash multimedia units are challenging the radio listening in car, so fitting new cars with factory-standard digital radio receivers is a clear goal the radio industry has to achieve also at a regulatory level.

SAFETY TEST

Italy will ban analog-only receivers as of 2020; and as for France, Conseil Supérieur de l'Audiovisuel board Member Nicolas Curien, emphasized that a goal of 20 percent of digital radio coverage of the French population could be reasonably achieved before the end of 2018, activating the law that requires all radio receivers to include a digital receiver within 18 months of that time.

In addition, Michael Hill, managing director of Radioplayer UK, showcased the results of a real-life user experience test. While driving on a curvy road, some drivers from U.K. were asked to prompt a touch-screen factory-fit DAB receiver for a number of different stations.

The drivers were then asked to do the same by prompting an Amazon Echo Dot device, which was in the car and was connected through mobile broadband access point. During the test, several purpose-fit onboard cameras recorded everything happening in and out the car.

The test highlighted how, by prompting the Alexa enabled device, test drivers could successfully tune into a national station three times more than by using the touch screen interface of a traditional, broadcast DAB receiver.

The “glancing away” figures while dealing with the two interfaces are impressive: the average glances away from road while performing the mentioned operation through the touch screen interface scored an alarming figure of 12.66 while the use of the Alexa device showed a figure of just 2 — more than six times lower.

Hill then endorsed the need for prompt availability of voice controlled in-car broadcast radio receivers. 

Author: Davide Moro
Posted: November 7, 2018, 3:30 pm
The author is president/CEO of the New Jersey Broadcasters Association. Rotella shared this commentary with press outlets Wednesday morning, and he highlights several policy issues of interest to radio broadcasters. His article has been lightly edited for style and length. Broadcast association ...

NJBA president/CEO tells broadcasters to remain vigilant and guard against potential reintroductions of performance tax legislative, other threats to free OTA radio

The author is president/CEO of the New Jersey Broadcasters Association. Rotella shared this commentary with press outlets Wednesday morning, and he highlights several policy issues of interest to radio broadcasters. His article has been lightly edited for style and length.

Broadcast association executives, and indeed all association executives, both national and local, have their work cut out for them this fall with the election and appointment of a record number of new representatives and congressional staff.

Make no mistake, with this new crop of freshman Congressmen and Congresswomen, (along with a handful of new Senators), it is imperative that we be ever-present on Capitol Hill to help educate and inform the hundreds of new congressional staffers, and perhaps more importantly, their hundreds of counterparts in House leadership and committee staff. And this important work can’t begin too early as we advance our sacred mission of advocacy and education.

Representing the broadcast industry, the New Jersey Broadcasters Association will be getting an early jump on the important initiatives we advanced in the last Congress, like the pirate radio legislation, SANDY Act, enhanced FM signal emergency alerting technology, along with the reinvigoration of SECC authority by the FCC, reformulation of arcane rules surrounding commercial radio ad disclaimers for automobile sales, streamlining of FCC procedures, and of course, our opposition of any performance royalty tax on broadcast radio.

Make no mistake, our opponents seeking to impose a toxic performance tax on broadcast radio have been gearing up for their “close-up” with the new members of Congress gaining power in January. And this issue, and its opposition, is not unique to Democrats or Republicans. Indeed, it crosses party lines. And we best not be complacent merely because we have beaten back this measure for over a decade in at least five Congresses thus far. All it takes is a simple majority in the House just one time, or for a late night amendment to be included in a “must-pass” piece of legislation, to destroy the broadcast industry

Every Congress, a few well meaning, but misinformed legislators, appear as to forget that they represent the people of their districts and not the foreign-owned record companies, and introduce, in one form or another, the noxious royalty fee legislation commonly known as the “performance tax.” It does no one any good at all, and helps stifle the creative growth and opportunities for success of emerging artists, while destroying the best thing that ever happened to our diverse, shared culture: the free-over-the-air delivery of all forms of entertainment, local news, and most of all — music, to everyone, for free — no matter your social status or place of origin — radio!

A performance tax would destroy radio as we know it, and indeed harm everyone; artists, composers, communities, broadcasters and most sadly, all Americans. Nielsen studies confirm that close to 300 million of our friends, family, neighbors and coworkers in America (the very constituents that these legislators are supposed to serve) listen to radio every day.

The good news is that support for the Local Radio Freedom Act supporting local radio continues to be strong in the House and the Senate. In the last Congress, more than 180 members of the House are on record in opposition to a performance tax. New Jersey Broadcasters would like to express our deep appreciation to Congressmen Gottheimer, LoBiondo, Frelinghuysen, Pallone, Smith, Pascrell, Lance, Sires, Payne, Coleman and Norcross for their courageous leadership in previously opposing this unfair and wrongheaded tax. These legislators are to be applauded for their early recognition and constant vigil over free-over-the-air radio’s service to the local communities they represent across the Garden State.

The P-Tax would demand exorbitant royalty fees from broadcasters to pay for the a few record labels failed business models. And these new royalty fees would be on top of the billions the radio industry already pays in royalties to artists and songwriters through ASCAP, BMI and SEASAC! In these challenging economic times (or in any economic model), can any industry afford such confiscatory increases in net operating costs? And the public would gain no return for the fees taken. No community service, no public announcements, no lifesaving Amber Alerts or EAS warnings. Nothing at all but making a few more millionaires and billionaires richer, and all at the public’s expense.

Nevertheless, the unavoidable result of the performance tax’s passage is much more than merely wreaking economic havoc on local radio stations. The passage of the bill would force the closing of a majority of local radio stations in New Jersey and across the country. To be sure, the prospect of enhanced opportunities for localism, diversity and outreach would be hushed immediately. Station groups and networks would be hurt, as well. Localism would be out the window and thousands in New Jersey would lose their jobs.

But this is all not about dollars; It is about common sense. Much more horrific, the closure of these vital broadcast outlets across America would also decimate our Emergency Alert System capabilities and pose a genuine threat to homeland security. And for what? So a few greedy foreign owned record companies can try to line their coffers with more American dollars, taking billions out of our economy? And worse, the move would directly or indirectly, wipe out hundreds of thousands of jobs in the United States.

Moreover, a new oppressive performance tax would hurt emerging artists who might not ever get their music on the air if stations have to pay a fee every time a new song is played. Performing artists almost universally recognize the honest and incomparable value only broadcast radio air-play adds to their industry and business model. The record label's recognition of the unparalleled promotional value of radio airplay contradicts statements made by recording industry representatives in Washington who have characterized radio airplay as "a form of piracy." What nonsense.

Our two industries have worked perfectly together for decades. Certainly, no artist would ever have an opportunity to become famous and successful absent their natural symbiotic partnership with free-over-the-air-radio! This symbiosis evinces the inescapable conclusion that both sides are benefiting. Why do you think local stations across the country are bombarded every day with sample CDs MP3s, and “demos” by emerging artists (and seasoned artists) begging station managers to play their new tune? It’s because broadcasters and artists genuinely “get it.” It’s how they sell records, (yes, vinyl records are making a comeback) CDs, downloads, video and merchandise.

Worse, the P-Tax’s foreseeable fractionalization of collaborative artists could hurt everyone associated with the creative process and diminish the very projects or songs they want to promote to be successful. It’s a recipe for collusion, litigation, division, unfairness, and disaster.

Equally disturbing is the disingenuous comparison of broadcast radio to internet providers and pay/subscription audio entertainment programming and fees paid by satellite radio. The proponents of this legislation want us all to be alike — just because cable, satellite and Internet services pay these royalties. We are not alike! Remember how radio stations helped warn and serve New Jerseyans crushed by Superstorm Sandy? Well, New Jerseyans do. Free over-the-air radio and television are the only exclusively local media in existence!

Our cherished stewardship of the public airways is a public trust, and no industry is more publically spirited. We have a very different mission from most; namely, to operate in the public interest; from the EAS for local emergency notification such as NJ Amber Alerts and to respond to community wide emergencies like Superstorm Sandy, ice and snow storms, and other extreme weather hazards, to local news of community events and happenings in entertainment from our great and diverse variety of formats.

The internet and satellite applications referred to in mislabeled “equitable royalty fee” arguments (and the specious claim of pure-play “radio” designations) do not provide such essential public service, nor are they designed or equipped to do so.

And to lie to rest the specious argument that the performing artists will get any money from the new performance tax, all you need to do is review the typical recording contract any new artist is “forced” to sign if they want to get their coveted “record deal”. It often provides for very little compensation to flow to the artist after record production and promotion costs are re-cooped.

Finally, I feel that our great New Jersey Broadcaster Association represents much more than the radio and television industry in the Garden State. We also represent the vast and diverse audiences that our Congress members so ably serve. We represent the people, and we stand with them. We respectfully ask all of Congress to do the same. It’s the right thing to do.

So keep listening, New Jersey! Let’s get to work together to inform our new representatives in Washington. And let’s keep New Jersey radio free for all to enjoy!

Author: Paul Rotella
Posted: November 7, 2018, 2:40 pm
In the continuing effort to help the automobile and broadcast industries deliver an enhanced user experience and increase safety in vehicles, Radioplayer introduced at the WorldDAB General Assembly in Berlin the Reference Radio, a prototype touchscreen radio for dashboards. The Reference Radio ...

The touchscreen radio prototype aims to reduce driver distraction, making roads safer

In the continuing effort to help the automobile and broadcast industries deliver an enhanced user experience and increase safety in vehicles, Radioplayer introduced at the WorldDAB General Assembly in Berlin the Reference Radio, a prototype touchscreen radio for dashboards.

The Reference Radio “hybrid” prototype is multiplatform, able to play DAB digital radio, FM, and internet radio streams, and shows a single list of stations across all those platforms. This means drivers don’t need to select different sources such as DAB, FM, or internet, but only tap a station logo to play it, leaving the system to handle the rest.

According to the company, safety has been a key factor in the design, reducing “driver distraction” with an easy, intuitive interface. A large display shows what’s playing, and the driver switches between favorite stations by tapping a logo, swiping the screen, or pressing the buttons on the steering wheel. In the next phase of development, Radioplayer plans to test voice control along with podcasts and personalization.

“We’ve distilled years of research, development and testing into this prototype, which will be the catalyst for a long-overdue conversation between broadcasters and car companies,” said Radioplayer Managing Director, Michael Hill. “The Radioplayer Reference Radio shows that radio can be simple, smart and sexy in the connected cars of the future.”

The company says Radio Reference is the “culmination of years of research and development with industry partners like WorldDAB, Digital Radio UK, RadioDNS, and Audi and that the prototype shows how broadcasters like the BBC, Global and Bauer want their stations to appear in the car radios of the future.”

A video demonstration of the Reference Radio in action can be seen here.

Author: Marguerite Clark
Posted: November 7, 2018, 1:24 pm
ChyronHego’s Visual Radio provides the audience with an opportunity to experience radio moments as they happen, turning radio listeners into viewers. The system is a fully or semi-automated software solution that switches cameras and plays graphics by analyzing audio signals and XML data from the ...

Latest enhancements include full integration with Live Assist Panels

ChyronHego’s Visual Radio provides the audience with an opportunity to experience radio moments as they happen, turning radio listeners into viewers.

The system is a fully or semi-automated software solution that switches cameras and plays graphics by analyzing audio signals and XML data from the radio station’s automation system.

Designed for web, mobile, and TV platforms, Visual Radio is an add-on to a radio production and does not require extra staff. The product adds a video component to radio broadcasters and combine audio, video, images, text, and social media into an interactive user experience.

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ChyronHego’s latest enhancements to Visual Radio include full integration with Live Assist Panels to enable customers to run all operations from within a browser environment.

Author: RW Staff
Posted: November 7, 2018, 7:00 am
VANCOUVER, Wash., Nov. 6, 2018 - 64 Audio, the leader in custom and universal fit in-ear monitors, is proud to announce the launch of three new custom models for musicians and audiophiles. The A6t (MSRP: $1,299), A4t (MSRP: $999), both of which feature 64 Audio’s new patent-pending tubeless tia ...

VANCOUVER, Wash., Nov. 6, 2018 - 64 Audio, the leader in custom and universal fit in-ear monitors, is proud to announce the launch of three new custom models for musicians and audiophiles. The A6t (MSRP: $1,299), A4t (MSRP: $999), both of which feature 64 Audio’s new patent-pending tubeless tia technology, and A3e (MSRP: $699) are now available at 64audio.com and authorized retailers.

“Each model has a unique sound signature, allowing musicians and audiophiles to choose a model that caters to their musical tastes,” said Vitaliy Belonozhko, 64 Audio founder and chief sound designer. “This is a significant launch for us. It represents the culmination of some very hard work by our R&D and engineering teams to bring a technology into virtually our entire lineup that was once available only in our flagship products. I’ve wanted to do this for a long time and I’m thrilled that we can make it available to even more musicians and audiophiles out there.”

Headlining for the A6t and A4t is tia, a technology exclusive to 64 Audio that works by eliminating sound-altering tubes and dampers. Sound produced by the tia system is able to disperse freely and effortlessly, yielding an incredibly smooth and musical frequency response. The A6t and A4t feature two major elements of the tia system: the tia high driver and the tia single bore design.

“Building off of 64 Audio’s popular 4-driver design, the A4t is the entry into our proprietary tia technology, delivering exceptionally lifelike clarity and musicality,” explained Belonozhko. “Its balanced sound signature makes it the perfect fit for just about any genre.”

The “in-ear monitor of choice” for touring musicians and discerning music lovers, the A6t features tia and LID™ (Linear Impedance Design) to greatly improve its popular 6-driver predecessor. “Our A6t features a full and detailed sound signature that brings out the warmth and musicality in any live mix or recording,” Belonozhko continued. “The A6t is ideal for musicians and audiophiles looking for added accuracy and resolution.”

LID™ is a technology exclusive to 64 Audio that ensures a consistent frequency response regardless of the source, perfect for musicians plugging into a variety of equipment.

The A3e is an extremely versatile IEM with impressive clarity and warmth for any instrument or genre. “With its neutral and balanced tuning, the A3e delivers a surprisingly transparent and musical sound ideal for musicians and music lovers alike,” Belonozhko concluded. “This 3-driver earphone also features LID.”

All three models also feature 64 Audio’s patent-pending apex™ (Air Pressure Exchange) Technology, a pneumatically interactive vent that dramatically reduces listening fatigue by releasing sound pressure that is inherent in earphone designs. 3D Fit™ is 64 Audio’s proprietary 3D printing process that results in a personalized fit not found in any other IEM.

From studio to stage to sophisticated home audio environments, 64 Audio has created the industry’s most innovative universal and custom-built in-ear monitors available to date. Founded by Vitaliy Belonozhko in 2010, a sound engineer who has been working with musicians and production companies for more than a decade, he discovered the advantages of IEMs over traditional floor “wedges” and recognized that a better solution to in-ear monitoring was needed. Today, 64 Audio supplies products worldwide to some of the best-known musicians, singers, and engineers in the world, as well as discerning audiophiles who demand nothing but the best sound reproduction from their systems. With new and unrivaled technologies such as apex™, LID™, and tia™, 64 Audio excels in challenging traditional earphone designs to bring-to-market unique and innovative audio products.

Watch the tia story here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=F11teSXvfI4

For details about the new models, please visit www.64audio.com/store/a-series

Learn more about tia here: www.64audio.com/technology/tia

Learn more about apex here: www.64audio.com/technology

About 64 Audio

64 Audio was founded by Vitaliy Belonozhko, a sound engineer who has been working with musicians and production companies for over a decade. He discovered the advantages of IEMs over traditional floor “wedges” and recognized that a better solution to in-ear monitoring was needed. Today, with a staff of over 70 people and a team of some of the best minds, 64 Audio has become the most innovative in-ear monitor manufacturer in the industry, supplying products worldwide and to some of the best-known bands and engineers in the world. With new and unrivaled technologies such as apex, LID, and tia, 64 Audio excels in challenging traditional earphone designs to bring-to-market unique and innovative audio products.

# # #

Author: CRL Public Relations
Posted: November 6, 2018, 6:47 pm
Northfield, IL - An upcoming webinar from MFM, the Media Financial Management Association, will discuss legal considerations for media organizations planning to take advantage of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision legalizing sports gambling.  Presented by Ann Bobeck, Special Counsel, for ...

Northfield, IL - An upcoming webinar from MFM, the Media Financial Management Association, will discuss legal considerations for media organizations planning to take advantage of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision legalizing sports gambling. 

Presented by Ann Bobeck, Special Counsel, for Covington & Burling LLP, and Gerry Waldron, a Partner at the firm, the online event will be held on Tuesday November 13 from 1:00 – 2:00 p.m.

“2018 has been a landmark year for sports gambling and gambling advertising. In May, the Supreme Court struck down The Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA), siding with the then-governor of the state of New Jersey that the 1992 law that prohibited most sports betting was unconstitutional,” said Mary M. Collins, President & CEO of MFM and BCCA, the media industry’s credit association.

Added Collins, “Since then a handful of States, most notably New Jersey and West Virginia, have authorized sports betting within their borders; today companies in those States are handling significant sports betting activity. Other States are likely to consider legislation next year that would expand the list of States where sports betting is legal. Meanwhile media companies have been updating their policies to keep apace of this evolving landscape and related opportunities which some estimate could represent as much as $7 billion in advertising revenue.”

About the Presenters:

Ann Bobeck is special counsel in the firm’s Communications and Media Practice Group. She previously served as Vice President and Deputy General Counsel at the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB). Bobeck advises media clients on a wide range of regulatory and transactional matters, including acquisitions, advertising, accessibility, children’s television programming, contests and promotions, emergency alerting, localism, ownership and control, indecency, political broadcasting, sponsorship identification and tower siting. Currently she is active guiding television broadcast stations through the post-Incentive Auction “repack” and the ATSC 3.0 “next-gen” transition.

Gerry Waldron represents communications, media, and technology clients before the Federal Communications Commission and Congress, and in commercial transactions. Mr. Waldron served as chair of the firm’s Communications and Media Practice Group from 1998 to 2008. Prior to joining Covington, Waldron served as the senior counsel on the House Subcommittee on Telecommunications. During his work for Congress, he was deeply involved in the drafting of the 1993 Spectrum Auction legislation, the 1992 Cable Act, the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA), and key provisions that became part of the 1996 Telecommunications Act.

About the Educational Webinar:

Eligible registered participants in the Distance Learning Seminar may receive up to one CPE credit toward their certified public accounting (CPA) license. MFM is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

The registration fee for the event is $50 for individual members of MFM and $75 for non-members. There is no charge for Corporate Member group employees. More information and an online registration form may be found on MFM’s website.

About MFM and BCCA:

Media Financial Management Association (MFM) is the premiere resource for financial professionals for media industry education, networking, and information sharing throughout the U.S. and Canada. More information about MFM is available on its website: http://www.mediafinance.org and via its updates on Linkedin, Facebook and Twitter. Its BCCA subsidiary serves as the media industry’s credit association. BCCA’s revenue management services encompass a variety of credit reports on national and local media advertisers, including Media Whys, a credit report for media businesses which offers a credit score based on industry-specific aging combined with trade data from Experian or D+B. More information about BCCA is available at http://www.bccacredit.com as well as its updates on Linkedin, Facebook and Twitter.

Author: Media Financial Management Association
Posted: November 6, 2018, 6:19 pm
The debate on the efficacy of the required NRSC measurement continues. The author is a consulting broadcast engineer in Madison. I just wanted to give you a heads-up: The guest commentary by Ray Uberecken entitled “Larry’s Right! NRSC Measurements Are Unneeded," in my view, contains an error. The ...

Rules call for annual harmonic and spurious measurements for AM stations, but the author wishes the same applied to FMs

The debate on the efficacy of the required NRSC measurement continues. The author is a consulting broadcast engineer in Madison.

I just wanted to give you a heads-up: The guest commentary by Ray Uberecken entitled “Larry’s Right! NRSC Measurements Are Unneeded," in my view, contains an error.

The author states that the annual test for AM stations “is an Occupied Bandwidth measurement only and does not require measurement of harmonics, intermod or spurious emissions.”

That is not correct. For more than 20 years, FCC rules 73.44 and 73.1590 have specifically called for annual harmonic and spurious measurements. Occupied bandwidth is everything that comes out of the transmitter — not just the modulation sidebands near the center frequency, as Mr. Uberecken writes.

73.1590 covers when and why the measurements need to be made, and 73.44 describes the specifications for AM stations to meet or exceed in these measurements.

Here are a couple excerpts from those rules that are pertinent to this point:

73.1590 (b) Measurements for spurious and harmonic emissions must be made to show compliance with the transmission system requirements of 73.44 for AM stations.

It doesn’t get much clearer than that! And...

73.44 (b) Emissions 10.2 kHz to 20 kHz removed from the carrier must be attenuated at least 25 dB below the unmodulated carrier level, emissions 20 kHz to 30 kHz removed from the carrier must be attenuated at least 35 dB below the unmodulated carrier level, emissions 30 kHz to 60 kHz removed from the carrier must be attenuated at least [5 + 1 dB/kHz] below the unmodulated carrier level, and emissions between 60 kHz and 75 kHz of the carrier frequency must be attenuated at least 65 dB below the unmodulated carrier level. Emissions removed by more than 75 kHz must be attenuated at least 43 + 10 Log (power in watts) or 80 dB below the unmodulated carrier level, whichever is the lesser attenuation, except for transmitters having power less than 158 watts, where the attenuation must be at least 65 dB below carrier level.

That final clause covering emissions more than 75 kHz from the carrier frequency refers to the rest of the radio spectrum! That’s the “harmonic and spurious” part of the measurement.

[Read Larry Wilkins' original controversial commentary calling on the FCC to ditch NRSC mask measurements for AM stations.]

For the annual Equipment Performance Measurements on AM stations, it has been my practice to use a spectrum analyzer or splatter monitor to measure the signals within 100 kHz of the carrier, a field intensity meter to measure the strength of the second, third and fourth harmonics, and a general coverage receiver to tune the range 500 kHz to 30 MHz checking for any spurious signals that might be related to the station under test.

The purpose of these tests is to ensure that the station is only putting is energy into the licensed slice of bandwidth and not elsewhere in the spectrum where it could interfere with other stations and services. In my view these are important checks that need to be made at least annually.

I’d go further: The same interference concerns apply to FM stations, and I feel they should be required to make annual measurements as well. But the FCC rules do not call for FM equipment performance measurements on a periodic basis — only when a transmitter is replaced or modified.

I understand this was a commentary, but misleading information regarding the commission rules could lead stations to make a serious compliance mistake.

Radio World invites industry-oriented commentaries and responses. Send to Radio World.

Here is an aggregation page for this topic.

Author: Steve Johnston
Posted: November 6, 2018, 5:40 pm
MORE PSA SUGGESTIONS I agree with much that the author, Dan Slentz, states in his article “Underwriting and PSA Tips for Noncoms” (RW April 25). However, I take exception to a few of his points. When “building your brand,” you must be careful to not promote your business or product since “No ...

Letters offer more industry insight

MORE PSA SUGGESTIONS

I agree with much that the author, Dan Slentz, states in his article “Underwriting and PSA Tips for Noncoms” (RW April 25). However, I take exception to a few of his points.

When “building your brand,” you must be careful to not promote your business or product since “No promotional announcement on behalf of for profit entities shall be broadcast at any time” (from 47C.F.R. §73.503(d)). It also states, “However, acknowledgements of contributions can be made.” This does not prohibit an NCE station from running commercials and promoting bona fide 501(c)3 nonprofit entities and for the station itself.

But watch out for prohibited complications involving commercial entities when tickets become involved.

The underwriting rule is for acknowledging contributions, and the FCC therefore allows identification of the donor, but there can be no promotional content. Broadcasters have figured out that the FCC will ding you for calls to action, pricing, comparatives and qualitative statements. Those prohibitions are not specified in the rules but are particular ways the FCC specified as reasons it fined stations for not adhering to the rule prohibiting any promotional announcements for commercial entities. Those are not necessarily the only ways to get into trouble for promoting a commercial entity.

The FCC rules do not have a rule exemption for slogans, so there is nothing allowing promotional or otherwise prohibited wordings when used within a slogan. About 15 years ago, I was on a conference call with a number of NCE stations addressing this very issue. Someone used the example that you could say, “You are in our hands with ‘MyState’ Insurance” but that “good” could not be used in the popular slogan in an underwriting announcement because it is a comparative word that represents the company. It does not matter whether or not it is in a slogan.

The author correctly stated that “If it feels, smells, looks, tastes or sounds like a commercial, it probably is a commercial!” But I would take that statement farther to say, “If it sounds promotional, then it is not allowed.” Permissible underwriting statements usually have passive verbs and do not include adjectives or adverbs.

Also, an underwriting announcement should be short. The FCC in DA-18-74 (a ruling dated Feb. 1) against two NCE stations said underwriting announcements 30 to 90 seconds in length were too long.

In paragraph three, the FCC states: “While an NCE licensee may broadcast underwriting announcements identifying entities that donate to the station by name, such announcements may not promote an entity’s businesses, products, or services. In addition, such announcements may not contain comparative or qualitative descriptions; price information (sales or discounts); calls to action; inducements to buy, sell, rent, or lease; and excessively detailed ‘menu listings’ of services offered by the entity. While the commission has not adopted any quantitative guidelines on underwriting announcements, it has found that the longer the announcement, the more likely it is to contain material that is inconsistent with their ‘identification only’ purpose. At the same time, however, the commission has acknowledged that it is at times difficult to distinguish between language that promotes versus that which merely identifies the underwriter. Consequently, the commission expects that licensees exercise reasonable ‘good faith’ judgment in this area and affords some latitude to the judgments of licensees who do so.”

I recall reading (I cannot put my hand on the reference right now) that there can be situations when providing contact and location information for the donor’s business would be appropriate — if it were not common knowledge, easily obtainable or if the business might be easily confused with other businesses. It communicated the expectation that this would not be common for most underwriting announcements.

Sometimes, when we see a forest we can forget to look at the trees. After all, “promotion” is the term used in the rule for what is prohibited in underwriting statements. Let’s get back to basics for compliance. We must stick to what is permitted: Identify the donor whose donation we acknowledge! Then it is a lot easier to avoid what is not allowed — anything promotional.

Alan Kilgore, WB4THU
Chief Engineer, WRVM(FM)
Suring, Wis.

 

ANOTHER RADIO RASCAL

Responding to “The Rabble-Rousers of Early Radio Broadcasting,” RW Sept. 1:

Very good article; well-researched. The one rascal not mentioned, however, is the Rev. Carl McIntire, who lost his FM radio license in Media, Pa., in 1973-74. He then proceeded to run a pirate AM station off the coast of New Jersey for a few months.

McIntire’s one-side right wing broadcasts were curtailed because he did not provide opposing views required under The Fairness Doctrine. (In 1987, Ronald Reagan eliminated the Fairness Doctrine, paving the way for Rush Limbaugh.)

Thanks for the great information!

Pete Simon
Arvada, Colo.

 

UNDERSTANDING PIRACY’S ROOTS

David Honig’s excellent article “What Will Take Down Radio Pirates — And What Won’t” (RW Sept. 26) hit the nail squarely on the head, particularly with regard to his opinion that minority communities are under-served by mainline radio stations.

While not excusing radio piracy, it does help to explain it. And while illegal interference to licensed stations is unacceptable, I suspect in many cases licensees so challenged object to interlopers in their exclusive game preserves, same as established restaurants harass the hotdog vendor on the corner. I applaud Multicultural Media, et. al. for highlighting and championing minority representation on the radio dial, albeit not through piracy.

Licensed stations need to awaken to this market and serve it with its music, news, entertainment and sponsors to diminish the appeal of radio piracy to those underserved communities.

But Honig’s best quote is: “First, [Congress] needs to restore the cuts to the FCC’s budget that brought about the closure of critical field offices.” Hallelujah and amen! That astounding action was akin to closing half the hospitals in the country in the midst of a crippling epidemic. Unfortunately, many highly qualified FCC engineers were cast aside in favor of lawyers who lack grassroots experience with radio communications engineering. Yes, by all means: Ramp-up those shuttered field offices and give the radio cops the tools necessary to patrol the airwaves again!

James B. Potter
Owner/CEO
Cutting Edge Engineering, The Little Spot Shop and JBPotter Agency
Kimberling City, Mo.

 

ALLOCATIONS AND THE C4 PROPOSAL

Responding to “What Is the Real Problem With the Proposed FM Class C4?” (www.radioworld.com, keyword “Haynes”):

I find this commentary more than a little disingenuous. The author seems to imply that he is somehow losing coverage over his primary broadcast area because he can’t have 12 kW.

A cursory check of WRTM shows that unlike the implication in the commentary, it’s not a signal licensed to Jackson, Miss. It is licensed to a suburb well outside the city (Sharon, Miss.), and clearly it has been shoehorned in as close as possible to the larger Jackson metro using a highly directional antenna that barely covers its community of license.

In other words, instead of working within the established schema for Class A FMs to be local broadcast services — not regional — WRTM has attempted to finagle its way into audience it’s not supposed to have, and now is demanding that the FCC give it even more coverage that it’s not supposed to have.

If you want to argue that the FCC’s system of allocations is a poor fit for the modern radio usage landscape? Fine, I’m 100 percent in agreement with that. But don’t pretend that you’re somehow magically being deprived of something and doubling your power — no doubt at the expense of both other nearby stations and the overall health/noise floor of the band — is going to solve all your problems.

We’ve been here before when all the Class C AM stations were increased to 1 kW day/night, and look what happened: It just made the mess worse.

If WRTM isn’t financially viable for you now, then it should be allowed to go under and re-auctioned to someone else. And if no one claims it, so much the better, as it cleans up the band just that much more.

Aaron Read
Director of Information Technology & Engineering
Rhode Island Public Radio
Providence, R.I.

 

FINDING AND TRAINING ENGINEERS

A recent Radio World email blast included a link to a piece titled “Help! I Have to Train an Engineer!” (from 2006). I found it somewhat amusing. Until I didn’t.

We have a problem finding and training broadcast engineers. It is a demanding career on many levels.

You need to understand audio, RF, computer networking and even computers. You will have to solder and crimp, and you may be asked to perform board level troubleshooting and repair.

This is a skill set that is not taught in most four-year degree programs. More specialized schools will do a better job, but they are not found in every community.

The article listed quite a few programs, but I wanted to make sure folks know about the training provided by Synergetic Audio Concepts (aka Syn-Aud-Con) and, more recently, Pro Audio Training (www.proaudiotraining.com).

In the way-too-many years that I’ve been attending seminars and training programs, this is the one that stands out. Their training is geared toward systems that terminate at a loudspeaker instead of a transmitter, but they cover the fundamentals so well that I recommend them to anyone interested in audio.

Syn-Aud-Con has been at the forefront of audio training since the early 1970s. They are the ones that brought pressure zone microphones, TEF and LEDE to the attention of the audio community at large. Which is kind of cool when you think about it.

But their biggest strength (to me at least) is their coverage of the fundamentals, the math and physics behind sound in the air and in a copper wire (including Ethernet/IP). Students can’t help but understand how the decibel and Ohm’s Law work and what the terms mean.

They offer both online and in-person training, and I think it is invaluable! I happily recommend it to anyone who asks.

Bill Thompson

 

CARRIER CURRENT

Interesting article on “The End of Carrier Current?” by Dan Braverman from October 2017.

There are several hobbyists still out there doing it. I’ve been doing this mode of broadcasting since early 1991, and I find it interesting that, when you see Carrier-Current gear come up on eBay, it sells out almost immediately. So somebody must still want this mode of broadcasting out there.

It is true that in the Part 15 license-free broadcasting circles, the 10 foot antenna to a 100 mW PEP AM transmitter is way more popular. With most folks, the idea of Carrier Current, in which you couple to the power lines, seems to scare people off of trying it. Given that, the majority of hobbyists out there are broadcast engineers of whom know what they are getting into. Nonetheless, it is another permissible broadcasting method that’s license-free, and maybe still an LPAM option for those who can’t do LPFM, for whatever reason.

Besides broadcast, Carrier-Current operations still exist in places where people don’t realize. Those wired-wireless FM intercoms? They use a low frequency of around 170 kHz and couple about 10 milliwatts to your house wiring in order to communicate within your home. Mining companies use it as a means to couple communications to what already exists for them. Power lines that have been installed down through mining shafts. Power companies still use carrier-current techniques for power station switching and monitoring.

Anyway, Carrier-Current techniques still exist, but with both LPB Inc., and Radio Systems, gone, this is indeed a blow to this method of broadcasting.

Phil Schoenthal
Owner/operator, AM610 / AM1620
Poca, W.Va.

Author: RW Staff
Posted: November 6, 2018, 5:40 pm
Commercial Radio Australia has joined Xperi Corp.’s list of broadcast radio partners to help develop the next generation connected car radio experience. According to Xperi, its All in Media team, based in London and Sydney, recently supported the development of the RadioApp Alexa skill. The ...

Will work together to enhance the radio experience in connected cars

Commercial Radio Australia has joined Xperi Corp.’s list of broadcast radio partners to help develop the next generation connected car radio experience.

According to Xperi, its All in Media team, based in London and Sydney, recently supported the development of the RadioApp Alexa skill. The RadioApp streaming radio platform will now be used to provide Australian commercial and public service radio content into the DTS Connected Radio platform.

This integration, says Xperi, will allow the refining of system operations, support on-going global automotive field-testing and product development of hybrid radio, and validate the implementation and listener experience in connected radios.

“Commercial Radio Australia has a long history of innovation and embracing new technology to serve the needs of their members and the Australian radio audience,” said Jeff Jury, general manager, Automotive at Xperi. “This is evidenced by their coordinated launch of DAB+, the leadership in creating RadioApp and their recent development of the industry wide Alexa skill. We are extremely pleased that CRA, with the support of our All in Media team, have joined Xperi in our efforts to ensure broadcast radio has a vibrant future in connected cars.”

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Utilizing an IP connection installed in a vehicle, DTS Connected Radio delivers a digital (DAB and HD Radio) experience by pairing broadcast programming with IP-delivered content. DTS Connected Radio aggregates metadata, such as on-air radio program and talent information, artist and song information, station contact information and more, from broadcasters around the world to deliver an enhanced in-vehicle radio experience.

“This work will allow us to test ways to combine both broadcasting and internet technologies to deliver richer content and a better in-car radio experience for listeners,” said Joan Warner, CEO of Commercial Radio Australia. “In our role as the national industry body representing Australia’s commercial radio industry, we look forward to working with Xperi on their development of the DTS Connected Radio system.”

Author: Marguerite Clark
Posted: November 6, 2018, 3:49 pm
Radio TechCon organizers have published the full program for the 2018 edition, taking place at IET London: Savoy place on Monday, Nov. 26. This year, the technical and engineering conference will cover topics including lighting for radio, the history of sound design and building a large transmitter ...

Will discuss lighting for radio, the history of sound design, lessons learned from Norway’s DSO, and more

Radio TechCon organizers have published the full program for the 2018 edition, taking place at IET London: Savoy place on Monday, Nov. 26.

This year, the technical and engineering conference will cover topics including lighting for radio, the history of sound design and building a large transmitter tower without taking the nation off air.

The full program, hosted by presenter David Lloyd, comprises a keynote presentation from ​Judy Parnall,​ chair of the European Broadcasting Union’s technical committee on audio transformation and the role of public services; ​technical lessons learned from Norway’s switch from broadcasting in FM to DAB+; loudness standards for smart speakers and podcasts​; LEDs and radios — h​ow designer kitchens might be interfering with your signal​; and how Bauer eliminated all the buttons in a studio and moved to ​touchscreen​ only.

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In addition, the Radio TechCon trade fair will offer an opportunity for attendees to meet event sponsors Broadcast Bionics, Arqiva, the IET Multimedia Communications Network, Scisys, Broadcast Radio, RCS and Preco, as well as this year’s exhibitors, which include Omniplayer, Hindenburg, Systembase/Beaming, HRadio and HHB.

Tickets for Radio TechCon cost £150 (US$196) + VAT, with discounts available for members of industry associations. Register here.

Author: Marguerite Clark
Posted: November 6, 2018, 1:47 pm
It’s no trick (but neither is it a treat) for a New Jersey man who was handed a $25,000 forfeiture order on October 31 for his alleged long-running operation of a pirate radio station. The exchanges between Winston Tulloch of Paterson, N.J., and the Federal Communications Commission’s Enforcement ...

Initial complaint about alleged pirate station was filed in 2015

It’s no trick (but neither is it a treat) for a New Jersey man who was handed a $25,000 forfeiture order on October 31 for his alleged long-running operation of a pirate radio station.

The exchanges between Winston Tulloch of Paterson, N.J., and the Federal Communications Commission’s Enforcement Bureau have been long standing — it was back in February 2015 that the commission first received a complaint that that several unauthorized radio stations were operating in Paterson. Agents from the New York field office observed what appeared to be an unauthorized broadcast station operating on 90.9 MHz, and using direction-finding techniques, determined the source of the signal was emanating from a multifamily unit. It was there that agents photographed an FM broadcast antenna located on the roof, the bureau said.

Agents returned three times in 2014 and 2016 — although the station was allegedly moved at least once to a multifamily complex a few streets away. In July 2017, agents issued a formal Notice of Unlicensed Radio Operation to tell Tulloch that any continued operation could lead to additional enforcement action.

[Read: Alleged N.J. Operator Faces $25,000 Penalty]

In September 2017, the FCC said, agents returned to the original location and determined that the station on 90.9 MHz was no longer in operation.

But because the commission determined Tulloch had allegedly “willfully and repeatedly” violated Section 301 of the Communications Act, it proposed a forfeiture of $25,000 in April 2018 — a forfeiture quite a bit higher than the commission’s typical base forfeiture of $10,000 — because Tulloch allegedly continued to allegedly operate an illegal FM broadcast station despite numerous warnings from the bureau. The boost in the forfeiture was “[due to] the repeated and intentional nature of Mr. Tulloch’s apparent violations.”

Tulloch did not file a response to the Notice of Apparent Liability for Forfeiture issued in April, the bureau said, and as a result the bureau formally assessed a forfeiture of $25,000.

“Commission action in this area [of the country] is essential because unlicensed radio stations do not broadcast Emergency Alert Service messages and therefore create a public safety hazard for their listeners,” the Enforcement Bureau said in its order. “Moreover, unlicensed radio stations create a danger of interference to licensed communications and undermine the commission’s authority over broadcast radio operations.”

If payment is not received with 30 days, the case may be referred to the U.S. Department of Justice.

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Author: Susan Ashworth
Posted: November 5, 2018, 7:09 pm
GEORGE, SOUTH AFRICA — Sentech, a South Africa-based company, offers signal distribution services to most of the country’s licensed broadcasters, which include the public broadcaster, commercial and community broadcasters. As an owner of 25 Audemat FM MC5 systems with 16 purchased in 2016 ...

All-in-one measurement solution meets requirements in rugged terrain

GEORGE, SOUTH AFRICA — Sentech, a South Africa-based company, offers signal distribution services to most of the country’s licensed broadcasters, which include the public broadcaster, commercial and community broadcasters.

As an owner of 25 Audemat FM MC5 systems with 16 purchased in 2016 and nine more purchased in 2017, Sentech says it is a satisfied customer of WorldCast Systems with its Audemat FM MC5. According to Danie Liebenberg, team leader in operations at Sentech, its team makes use of all the Audemat FM MC5 functions when doing commissioning, development and testing of new FM equipment, fault-finding, alignment and measurements when repairing existing equipment and when doing automated test sequences through script functionalities.

The FM MC5 also helps Sentech carry out its support maintenance which include full mast, cable and antenna inspections as well as drive-by measurements to confirm correct FM antenna radiation patterns and reporting on lack of coverage in new developing areas. The drive-by tests’ full reports go straight to the planners, which helps Sentech in their decision-making process when considering possible new sites.

SIMPLIFIED PROCESS

“One of Sentech’s key operational imperatives and actually one of our strategic pillars is to operate more efficiently. The FM MC5 provides this in more ways than one and in our opinion, its best features are its all-in-one versatility and drive-by test capability which has massively simplified things for us,” said Liebenberg.

Pictured from left are Guillaume Boutin and Olivier Soulié of WorldCast Systems, Danie Liebenberg of Sentech and David Houzé of WorldCast Systems.

“In the past we had to carry multiple instruments of which some were heavy and bulky to transport. We also needed to conduct static measurements using a five-element FM antenna and telescopic pole that we would transport with us when doing our field tests. The size of the antenna in particular complicated our task during windy conditions. The amount of measure points was extremely limited due to this tedious process. Today, all we need to do is attach a small GPS and FM omnidirectional magnetic base antenna onto the roof of the vehicle, quickly configure the FM MC5 for the drive-by measurement, and we’re ready to go.”

He adds, “Multiple measurements at a magnitude of measuring points get done while driving at normal driving speed. By the click of a button, a professional report gets generated that can immediately be represented to customers.”

The Audemat FM MC5 is a lightweight, all-in-one system, and it comes with a durable transport case. With most of Sentech’s work taking place in rugged, mountainous landscapes, sometimes taking one hour to travel 6 miles to reach a site, Sentech says the transport case was a key factor when deciding to purchase the Audemat FM MC5.

During its two years as a WorldCast Systems’ customer, Sentech has also benefited from expert customer support. “We received their team’s support from time of purchase and system deployment, continuing up until now. I would definitely recommend the Audemat FM MC5 as a measurement solution for the FM broadcasting environment,” Liebenberg concluded.

For information, contact Tony Peterle at WorldCast Systems in Florida at 1-305-249-3110 or visit www.worldcastsystems.com.

Author: Chantal Fourgeaud, Director of Marketing Communications, WorldCast Systems
Posted: November 5, 2018, 5:30 pm
The ninth annual International Radio Festival, Oct. Oct. 29 – Nov. 4, offered a unique opportunity for radio industry professionals to discuss business, production and curation of radio content and to celebrate station talent. Held at the Piazza D’Armi in Valletta, Malta (the European Capital of ...

Fully IP pop-up studio featured gear from The Telos Alliance, DEVA, WinMedia and Tieline

The ninth annual International Radio Festival, Oct. Oct. 29 – Nov. 4, offered a unique opportunity for radio industry professionals to discuss business, production and curation of radio content and to celebrate station talent.

More than 30 stations broadcast from an IP studio in Fort St Elmo. All photos: Marguerite Clark

Held at the Piazza D’Armi in Valletta, Malta (the European Capital of Culture 2018), the gathering is, according to Festival Director Darryl von Däniken, the “largest public on-air and on-location radio event reaching millions of listeners around the globe.” It serves as center stage for stations to showcase their music show formats to their peers, as well as to local and global audiences around the world.

This year, more than 30 stations, made up of commercial, public, large and small broadcasters, aired live from the IRF on-air studio via the festival’s temporary DAB+ channel to Malta, Gozo and Comino, and online back to their respective home audiences worldwide, reaching more than 100 million listeners globally. Live broadcasts took place from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. each day with each station airing its program during an assigned slot.

IRF’s broadcasting technology consultants, Jean-Pascal Ruch of Swiss-based Consultec and Simon Binggeli set up a fully equipped IP-only on-air studio for this purpose.

IRF's broadcasts were carried out with an Axia Fusion digital radio console and WinMedia Playout system, Tieline codecs and an Omnia Volt audio processor.

Ruch says it was necessary to provide station talent with a complete and easy to use on-air studio able to fit the needs of both a small or large stations, and to also ensure that the audio made it safely to the stations back home.

“Having to bring the equipment to Malta from Switzerland could have been a challenge, but we were able to put together the system in Switzerland before shipping, so the installation in Malta was done rather quickly,” he said. 

“With ISDN being faded out almost everywhere today, the main obstacle could have been sending audio via internet to each participant's radio station, as you never know what’s going to happen with the connections you get locally. Fortunately, however, connecting the studio to those 30 radio stations went very smoothly and they all received their audio accurately."

[Related: Radio World in Malta]

Fitted with equipment loaned to the IRF by industry manufactures, the studio was built around an Axia Fusion digital radio console and WinMedia playout system and featured four fixed Audio-Technica BP40 hypercardioid large-diaphragm dynamic broadcast mics, Audio-Technica ATH-M50x professional studio monitor headphones and mic arms by Yellowtec.

Tieline provided the codec technology with a rack-mounted Genie audio codec for broadcasts back to each station’s home country, a Merlin codec for local DAB+ transmission and a portable Tieline ViA portable codec. 

The IRF serves as center stage for stations to showcase their music show formats to their peers, as well as to local and global audiences around the world.

Additional equipment in place included an Axia 3001-00058 IP-audio driver for Windows with eight stereo ins and outs and a Telos Alliance Z/IPstream 9X2 (streaming software with Omnia.9 audio processing) for streaming the IRF program to the internet.

In addition, a full DJ set-up was available featuring CDJ's, turntables, mixers and monitors.

Also during the event was a one-day audio Conference, held at the Mediterranean Conference Centre on Nov. 1, which featured a host of presentations focused around the business, production and curation of audio and radio content.

[Related: International Radio Festival Celebrates Radio Reinvention]

Von Däniken explains that the festival aims to “bring together like-minded music radio pioneers to live their passion, knowledge share their formats and ideas, network and make friends, and forge closer ties with the music industry, and so help continue enriching the listening experience for all audiences around the world.”

Author: Marguerite Clark
Posted: November 5, 2018, 3:25 pm
WorldCast Systems’ SmartFM technology applies Artificial Intelligence to FM radio broadcasting. According to the company, it has spent three years of intensive R&D along with field testing and measurement at on-air stations on this patented technology, which is designed to enhance listening ...

SmartFM technology is designed to enhance listening experience, lower energy costs and reduce CO2 emissions

WorldCast Systems’ SmartFM technology applies Artificial Intelligence to FM radio broadcasting.

According to the company, it has spent three years of intensive R&D along with field testing and measurement at on-air stations on this patented technology, which is designed to enhance listening experience, lower energy costs by 10 to 40 percent, and allows broadcasters to lower COemissions.

With its Ecreso brand, WorldCast Systems has over 60 years of experience in designing low, medium, and high-power FM transmitters and has equipped approximately 10,000 sites worldwide. SmartFM technology is compatible with new Ecreso transmitters and models already on the market.

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Author: RW Staff
Posted: November 5, 2018, 10:57 am
Valletta, MALTA — Stations from around the world broadcast live from Valletta, the European Capital of Culture 2018, as part of the ninth International Radio Festival in Malta. Stations including Fun Kids and Jazz FM from the United Kingdom, Like FM in Russia, Kiss FM Melbourne, and RAI Radio 3 ...

Worldwide stations head to Malta for broadcasts and audio conference

Valletta, MALTA — Stations from around the world broadcast live from Valletta, the European Capital of Culture 2018, as part of the ninth International Radio Festival in Malta.

Stations including Fun Kids and Jazz FM from the United Kingdom, Like FM in Russia, Kiss FM Melbourne, and RAI Radio 3 from Italy joined local favorites 89.7 Bay, Magic Malta and Vibe FM. Presenters included the Sound of India contest winner, R.J. Devaki. The stations broadcast from a purpose-built pop-up studio in Fort St Elmo via DAB+ in Malta, online and via Facebook and YouTube.

A one-day audio conference took place on Nov. 1.

View the 8 images of this gallery on the original article

The Festival opened with a welcome from Malta’s Minister of Tourism, Konrad Mizzi, who joined the Pride Radio show from the IRF studio. Mizzi said the event was “a celebration of different channels coming together, and I am delighted to be hosting it in Malta.”

The Festival also included a one-day audio conference in the historic surroundings of the Mediterranean Conference Center, formerly the 16th-century “Sacra Infermeria” of the Order of St John of Jerusalem.

The conference explored the reinvention of radio, opening with the Chief Executive of Malta’s Broadcasting Authority, Dr. Joanna Spiteri, saying that “radio has continually evolved with the times and keeps advancing with new technology.”

Paul Smith, head of Editorial Standards for BBC Radio, spoke about the evolution of its own audio offering, including the launch of the BBC Sounds app, which brings together live radio, listen-again content and podcasts.

[Related: Radio World in Malta]

Scott Cohen, co-founder of digital distribution company The Orchard prompted a lively debate by declaring “radio is dead, streaming services have disrupted listening habits”, which was firmly challenged by the panel including Xanthe Fuller, head of Community at Mixcloud, who cautioned that with playlists “you can be in an echo chamber of your own taste.”

Composer, arranger and producer, David Lowe, spoke about creating the current BBC News theme, in use since 1999 and instantly recognizable around the world. He explained how he took the familiar Greenwich Time Signal — known as “the pips” — as the basis for the theme, and built the music around them.

Malta is positioning itself as “Blockchain Island,” and with a separate significant conference on the topic taking place nearby, Cliff Fluet, managing director of London-based law firm Lewis Silkin explained how the radio, audio and music industry is well-placed to benefit from this new technology.

[Read: IRF Broadcasts Highlight Station Talent]

The Content Director of the U.K.’s Absolute Radio, Paul Sylvester, marked the 10th anniversary of his station’s launch, noting that “radio has the spirit and ability and the passion to do things differently.” He added “radio is in a great place where we can do things other people can’t. We can have an idea at 6 a.m. and have it on air by 10 a.m. TV can’t do that. Use that power to your advantage.” 

Author: Will Jackson
Posted: November 5, 2018, 10:26 am
The adoption of cloud solutions by the broadcast market is accelerating. Thanks to the portability of data and flows, as well as the relative standardization of systems, we now have access to a full range of services: Infrastructure as a Service, Platform as a Service, Software as a Service, and ...

The industry continually is striving for freer and more nomadic modes of operation

The adoption of cloud solutions by the broadcast market is accelerating.

Pascal Malgouyard

Thanks to the portability of data and flows, as well as the relative standardization of systems, we now have access to a full range of services: Infrastructure as a Service, Platform as a Service, Software as a Service, and tomorrow, Radio-as-a-Service.

FLEXIBILITY AND SECURITY

This turning point corresponds to a strong technological trend that today combines two worlds: flexibility and security. It is by surfing the wave and the success of the IT world in exploiting professional business applications that these services gradually have been opened to broadcasters, particularly radio.

Starting from a mature and stable market, radio workflows can now be built easily using cloud technologies. The cloud benefits from shared structures, which make it more accessible and cheaper than before, turning cap-ex spending into flexible op-ex.

It also offers more elasticity in terms of investment; while you “get what you pay for,” customers also benefit from a multitude of ancillary services, including performance indicators, regular updates (new features and functionality), scalability and security of access as well as the outsourcing of maintenance and online support.

As far as security is concerned, professional applications have implemented a level of security and data protection similar to the famous GAFA [Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon], which now seems suitable for broadcasters.

Nevertheless, it is important to highlight some strategic aspects that should not be overlooked when choosing to migrate real-time features to the cloud. For example, it is preferable to select hosting in the geographical area of the broadcaster to avoid latencies in audio streams that can occur unexpectedly on the Internet.

CONSIDERATIONS

Furthermore, while security is based on the hosting of the applications it also relies on the confidence that one has in the developers and the security of their implementation. It is therefore a good idea to work with recognized major brands. It is also good to check redundant access to applications and their data with the developers.

That being said, cloud development will have a major role in the broadcast world for years to come, bringing with it a virtual radio studio concept that heralds an unprecedented freedom of action.

It is therefore natural for current market solutions to turn toward this vision, particularly in infrastructure with important parts of the workflow associated with solutions that allow real-time audio applications to be linked together.

Offered on a subscription basis and accessible from anywhere, cloud technologies make it easy and affordable for even the smallest broadcasters or production companies to connect and manage audio outside sources and bring content to the control room.

[Read: Leveraging Technologies to Forge the Broadcast Future]

Virtualized infrastructures open the door to the virtualization of a secure cloud-based studio thanks to new applications that enable greater flexibility, pay-as-you-go operation, integration with a professional console in the cloud and, above all, an ease of use that corresponds to new, freer and more nomadic modes of operation.

Author: Pascal Malgouyard
Posted: November 5, 2018, 8:53 am
Cumulus Media has named Nick Fox program director of Pensacola, Fla.’s WXBM(FM), and the company named also Robert Elfman as PD of Wilmington, N.C., stations WGNI(FM) and WKXS(FM). Fox will also be heard on air on weekday afternoons. He joins Cumulus Media from Saga Communications, where he was ...

Nick Fox and Robert Elfman join the broadcaster, get new roles

Nick Fox

Cumulus Media has named Nick Fox program director of Pensacola, Fla.’s WXBM(FM), and the company named also Robert Elfman as PD of Wilmington, N.C., stations WGNI(FM) and WKXS(FM).

Fox will also be heard on air on weekday afternoons. He joins Cumulus Media from Saga Communications, where he was assistant PD for WVVR(FM) in Clarksville, Tenn. Fox began his radio career at WABB(FM) in Mobile, Ala. Fox spent his early life in Florida, and in the announcement, he said he was “ecstatic to be back home as the PD of WXBM.”

Elfman has spent the past 11 years with Eagle Communications, most recently in Manhattan, Kan., as operations manager, program director/morning drive for KJCK(FM) and program director for KJCK(AM). He also served as an on-air talent for KVGB(FM).

Robert Elfman

Cumulus combines local programming with nationally syndicated brands through its 440 owned-and-operated stations broadcasting in 90 U.S. media markets, approximately 8,000 broadcast radio stations affiliated with its Westwood One network and numerous digital channels.

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Author: Emily M. Reigart
Posted: November 4, 2018, 5:00 pm
iHeartMedia Minneapolis announced today that Dave Jansen has been named vice president of sales; and in Canton, Ohio, Scott Davidson has been named program director for WHOF(FM) and W259BW. Jansen will now report to Western Great Lakes Region Vice President of Sales Greg Alexander. Prior to this ...

And in Canton, Ohio, Scott Davidson named PD for WHOF

Dave Jansen

iHeartMedia Minneapolis announced today that Dave Jansen has been named vice president of sales; and in Canton, Ohio, Scott Davidson has been named program director for WHOF(FM) and W259BW.

Jansen will now report to Western Great Lakes Region Vice President of Sales Greg Alexander.

Prior to this appointment, he was a digital sales manager for Comcast. He is also an iHeart alum — he was an account executive from 2007 to 2009. Jansen also worked for a half-decade as digital lead at the Star Tribune newspaper.

iHeartMedia Minneapolis owns and operates KDWB(FM), KFXN(FM), KQQL(FM), KCTZ(FM), KEEY(FM), KTLK(AM/FM), KQQL(HD2), KQQL(HD3) and KTCZ(HD3).

A Stark County native, Davidson will also continue to broadcast weekday mornings on WHOF, and he will report to iHeartMedia North Ohio Area Senior Vice President of Programming Keith Kennedy.

Davidson has also held several programming position, including on-air personality at WHYI(FM) in Miami, on-air personality at WMBX in West Palm Beach, Fla., and WKDD in Akron, Ohio, as well as music director for Hot 95.9 Canton.

iHeartMedia Akron/Canton consists of WKDD(FM), WRQK(FM), WHOF(FM) W259BW(FM), WHLO(AM) and WARF(AM).

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Author: Emily M. Reigart
Posted: November 3, 2018, 6:00 pm
The author is membership program director of the National Federation of Community Broadcasters. NFCB commentaries are featured regularly at www.radioworld.com. This has been a difficult seven days for many of us, with a spate of horrifying crimes grabbing headlines nationwide. The perniciousness of ...

Recent events offer radio a unifying place

The author is membership program director of the National Federation of Community Broadcasters. NFCB commentaries are featured regularly at www.radioworld.com.

This has been a difficult seven days for many of us, with a spate of horrifying crimes grabbing headlines nationwide. The perniciousness of these acts is only worsened by their targeting of things so many Americans hold dear: inclusion and democracy. Yet, amid all the confusion and questions, community radio can step in during this moment to foster unity.

The news has been grim. More than a dozen pipe bombs mailed to prominent politicians and media were caught in transit or on site. None of the devices exploded and no one was injured, fortunately. Law enforcement quickly captured a reported white supremacist, whose life would be examined shortly thereafter in media reports.

[Read: Community Broadcaster: College Radio Shows the Way]

In Pittsburgh, Pa. and Jeffersontown, Ky., shootings by alleged white supremacists have left a nation struggling for answers. Violence at protests, confrontations in restaurants, and growing hostility fuel the ticker every day. At dinner tables across the country, people are talking about politics, the tone of the United States, the state of mental health and much more.

Where can community radio start to explore these matters?

It is quite easy to rush to the go-to trope: that current events and the latest political rhetoric are fostering divisions. While this is a popular talking point — in part because it inevitably taps the news cycle of the moment and stirs emotions — the story is more complicated. In fact, hate crimes in the U.S. actually have been climbing for years. Community radio can investigate the state of the nation and contribute substantively, rather than fall into the commercial TV trap of blaming left or right.

Here are just a few departures you can take to look at our country’s climate and increasing numbers of tragedies.

Mental illness has become politicized in some circles for how it can be referenced. To be clear, however, how mental illness is recognized and handled by law enforcement and, more importantly, lawmakers is a life and death issue. For instance, one’s arrest record and classification for mental health issues can, in states like Florida, show up on your background check and exclude you from gun purchases. Such was the case with the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooter, who exhibited many disturbing behavior patterns, but still cleared a background check to buy a gun he used in the shootings. In other states, whether and how someone is institutionalized, whether the state has the right to do so involuntarily, and on what conditions indirectly impact matters like the ability to own, purchase or be near a firearm. What is your state’s level of involvement regarding mental illness and these issues? How do police in your region handle mental illness or reports of potentially dangerous activities by citizens? These are all valid questions your station can ask.

Another way to approach these issues: last year, the New York Times focused on the growing problem of online radicalization. Seemingly emerging to the public consciousness due to the effective recruitment tactics of the Islamic State militant group, use of YouTube, Facebook and other platforms to recruit extremist sympathizers has gotten more and more attention. In spite of tech companies seeking to marginalize radical elements on the political spectrum, they have failed to drive them off the web. A possible dialog for community media has to do with counteracting online recruitment. What can communities do? What can parents, who are seeing many of these efforts aimed at their children, do to educate young people? Amid coverage of the latest crimes, the use of online communities and social media as an outlet and resource is becoming clearer. What groups in your state are calling for better stewardship of the digital space?

And lastly, Axios recently offered a provocative observation. “America is an increasingly diverse nation but a loud, hyperactive group of well-to-do whites on the left and right are tearing it apart from the edges.” In the study, it notes fully two-thirds of those surveyed are generally liberal to moderate to politically disengaged, but report feeling exasperated. The rest, split between white liberals and conservatives, are hyperengaged, deeply partisan and have the resources to exert themselves moreso than many others. While it’s clear these may not be the criminal elements that are leading the news, Axios’ suggestion that the political polarization we hear so much about is the product of a particular segment may be the start of a local conversation.

With midterms next week, the potential for more strain and, sadly, more conflict is upon us. As America struggles with the latest senseless incidents, community media can play a crucial role in bridging a gap, and for creating a better understanding of our tense world.

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Author: Ernesto Aguilar
Posted: November 2, 2018, 9:59 pm
The NAB Education Foundation is accepting applications for the 2019 Technology Apprenticeship Program now through Jan. 31. The program is open to graduating college/technical school seniors who want to work in the technical side of broadcasting. Examples of relevant career interests include: ...

Program is open to graduating seniors who want to work in the technical side of broadcasting

The NAB Education Foundation is accepting applications for the 2019 Technology Apprenticeship Program now through Jan. 31.

The program is open to graduating college/technical school seniors who want to work in the technical side of broadcasting. Examples of relevant career interests include: electrical engineering, information technology, telecommunications or radio and television transmission.

[Read: Engineering Careers on TAP]

The six-month program kicks off in March. In addition to becoming Certified Broadcast Technologists through the Society of Broadcast Engineers, TAP participants will also:

  • attend NAB Show in Las Vegas in April;
  • complete a paid, two-month apprenticeship at a radio or TV station starting in June;
  • and produce a live webcast from NAB headquarters in Washington in August.

Apply online here.

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Author: Emily M. Reigart
Posted: November 2, 2018, 7:44 pm
Beasley Media Group has promoted three employees at WSOC(FM) in Charlotte, N.C. Jack Daniel has been named program director for WSOC(FM) and WBCN(AM/FM). Also, Philip “Big Sexy” Tabakelis has been named as the assistant program director for WSOC. Additionally, Mimi Wheeler has added music director ...

Jack Daniel, Philip “Big Sexy” Tabakelis and Mimi Wheeler get new responsibilities

Jack Daniel

Beasley Media Group has promoted three employees at WSOC(FM) in Charlotte, N.C. Jack Daniel has been named program director for WSOC(FM) and WBCN(AM/FM). Also, Philip “Big Sexy” Tabakelis has been named as the assistant program director for WSOC. Additionally, Mimi Wheeler has added music director duties at WSOC.

Philip “Big Sexy” Tabakelis

Daniel will continue to work as the afternoon on-air personality. He’s been on the air in Charlotte since 1975 and has worked as a program director, vice-president/general manager, operations manager, music director and on-air personality.

Tabakelis joined the WSOC team in 2006, working in promotions. He eventually switched to talent and was named host of “The Big Sexy Show” in 2009.

Mimi Wheeler

Wheeler will continue as co-host of the “Tanner in the Morning Show” as well as assistant digital program director. She has over eight years in the industry and also held on-air talent, music director and promotions director in the Raleigh/Greensboro markets.

Beasley Media Group is a subsidiary of Beasley Broadcast Group, which owns and operates 64 stations in 15 markets.

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Author: Emily M. Reigart
Posted: November 2, 2018, 7:19 pm
Cox Media Group has upped Chris Eagan to senior director of operations for CMG Atlanta. He will now oversee programming for WSB(FM), WSRV(FM) and WALR(FM), in addition to his work in promotions and digital content, as well as commercial production in the Atlanta market. Eagan joined Cox Media Group ...

He now adds responsibility as senior director of operations

Cox Media Group has upped Chris Eagan to senior director of operations for CMG Atlanta. He will now oversee programming for WSB(FM), WSRV(FM) and WALR(FM), in addition to his work in promotions and digital content, as well as commercial production in the Atlanta market.

Eagan joined Cox Media Group in 2008 as WEZN’s program director. He was named director of branding and programming for WSB and WSRV in 2012.

“He is well-respected not only in radio but across all divisions of CMG, advocating for the brand and serving as a strong partner to his peers in TV and newspaper,” said CMG Atlanta Vice President of Marketing, Audience and Newspaper Operations Donna Hall.

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Author: Emily M. Reigart
Posted: November 2, 2018, 6:57 pm
The debate on the efficacy of the required NRSC measurement continues. The author is chief engineer for the Cumulus Radio Station Group in Colorado Springs, Colo. The NRSC-2 required yearly measurement should not have been instituted in the first place. It was made mandatory to add the filter to ...

More on NRSC: Uberecken says the practice is outmoded and not needed for most AM stations

The debate on the efficacy of the required NRSC measurement continues. The author is chief engineer for the Cumulus Radio Station Group in Colorado Springs, Colo.

The NRSC-2 required yearly measurement should not have been instituted in the first place. It was made mandatory to add the filter to the air chain ahead of the transmitter to limit the audio modulation bandwidth in the 1980s. But since it was required, it should have had a sunset date of five years. I totally agree with Larry Langford’s premise.

[Read: Let’s Toss Another Expensive and Useless Rule!]

The NRSC-2 is an “Occupied Bandwidth” measurement only and does not require measurement of harmonics, intermod or spurious emissions. All AM stations are required to make this measurement yearly and only a few do not pass causing unnecessary burden to nearly all. I made these measurements as part of a contract engineering business for many years. The NRSC-2 measurement is not a good measure of a stations performance, it was intended to eliminate interference. We as engineers are responsible for all operating parameters at our stations and the occupied bandwidth is only a very small part.

Nowadays, the occupied bandwidth rules have been changed to accommodate the IBOC digital sidebands and the transmitters that transmit IBOC further limit the analog audio bandwidth to 5–8 kHz.

For what it is worth, two of us in the Colorado Springs market have Audemat GoldenEagle monitors and we check all stations in this market for things like occupied bandwidth every week. We notify the appropriate engineer if anything is amiss. Anyone can buy a very good quality HP spectrum analyzer with the required 300 Hz resolution to do this type of measurement for under $1,000 on eBay. Several manufacturers make new spectrum analyzers that can do this measurement for about the same price.

I am not saying “do away with the requirement,” just the required measurement for all stations each year. There simply is no justification for it.

Radio World invites industry-oriented commentaries and responses. Send to Radio World.

Here is an aggregation page for this topic.

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Author: Ray Uberecken, CSRE, AA0L
Posted: November 2, 2018, 5:58 pm
Our next radio origin story comes from Henry Engineering’s Hank Landsberg. Hank writes that it’s 1963, and he’s 11 years old. He’s hanging with his best friend Dave at his house in Pasadena, Calif. Known by Dave’s mom as “Junior Scientists,” they are frequently experimenting with electrical and ...

Plus, two ideas to improve your comfort and your monitoring ability

Our next radio origin story comes from Henry Engineering’s Hank Landsberg.

Hank writes that it’s 1963, and he’s 11 years old. He’s hanging with his best friend Dave at his house in Pasadena, Calif. Known by Dave’s mom as “Junior Scientists,” they are frequently experimenting with electrical and audio stuff, building mic mixers, fixing phonographs, running wires for speakers throughout the house and just having fun.

One evening, Dave’s dad brings home the coolest, most awesome “audio toy,” a SoundScriber office dictating machine. This large, heavy machine was built in the early 1950s and used by executives to dictate letters for their secretaries. What gave the SoundScriber machine its endless possibilities as a creative toy was the medium upon which it recorded sound: a vinyl record. The “recording blank” was a thin, flexible vinyl disc. It was green in color, 7 inches in diameter, with a quarter-inch, square center hole.

The SoundScriber machine looked like a phonograph but had two “tonearms,” one for recording audio onto the disc, the second for playing it back. It recorded audio by embossing grooves into the soft vinyl material. The grooves were very closely-spaced, not unlike a microgroove LP. The machine’s turntable ran at 33 1/3 rpm so the record, once recorded, could be played on any phonograph.

Two 11 year-old kids now had the ability to make their own phonograph records! Nothing could be cooler for a couple of creative minds.

Thankfully, the gift of the SoundScriber machine included a box of recording blanks, and Dave and Hank immediately began to record all sorts of interesting stuff, including sound effects. They also created “radio shows” by mixing in music and effects.

After a few weeks of producing a library of audio adventures, a crisis arose: The box of recording blanks was empty! The manufacturer had discontinued production of the green vinyl discs, and the machine itself was no longer in production.

Now what? The boys had a good machine to make records, but nothing to record them on. The Junior Scientists got to work finding an alternative — like flattened pie tins since the grooves were embossed, not cut! The pie tins worked OK, but were very noisy.

On to the next solution: re-using the existing vinyl discs. By heating up the vinyl, perhaps it would soften and the grooves would disappear.

To a way to warm up the vinyl: A saucepan inverted on a stove burner kept the vinyl from getting too hot. The process was slow, so the boys got distracted, leaving the kitchen for a while. Laden with groceries, Dave’s mom came home, opened the door and was greeted with an acrid, throat-searing stench. (Hank adds it was probably highly toxic, too.)

The kitchen was filling with smoke, and the green vinyl is bubbling away. The goo was dripping down the pan onto the stove, and the kitchen ceiling was covered with a thick black soot. At this point, Hank high-tailed it out of there, leaving poor Dave to take the brunt of his mom’s anger. But there was plenty for the both of them, as she called Hank’s mother, who was armed with a few choice words of her own for Hank when he returned home.

And that was the day their recording career ended in a blaze of black smoke and green vinyl glory.

A week later, the whole event was behind them. Hank was re-welcomed to Dave’s house, and he and Hank remain very good friends to this day. But they never tried to melt records on mom’s stove again.

Hank has recently updated the Henry website; check it out at https://henryeng.com.

 

Alpha Media Fredericksburg’s John Diamantis found a tractor seat cushioned drum stool at a music supply store. Manufactured by PDP and shown below, the stool is ideal for punching down analog/Cat-6 wires or for extended computer programming.

Use a PDP Drum Stool for support when working in a rack.

As you can see, the drummer’s stool with the tractor seat is sold for just under $100; plain cushioned drummer’s stools are in the $30 price range. The stool beats sitting on the floor to do your work.

 

Rural Florida Communications Cooperative’s Wayne Eckert responds to our temperature monitoring topic from the Sept. 12 column.

He says there is a simple and inexpensive way to monitor temperature anywhere using an LM34 Precision Fahrenheit Temperature Sensor. This is a low-draw linear chip that can be powered with from 5 to 30 VDC, and outputs a voltage that matches one to one the temperature it senses, +10 mV per degree.

Here is a link to the Texas Instruments data sheet, which explains its operation and provides example schematics: https://tinyurl.com/y9xwr4ns. And this link takes you to Digikey, where you can purchase the LM34: https://tinyurl.com/yaxvc9p4.

Contribute to Workbench. You’ll help fellow engineers and qualify for SBE recertification credit. Send Workbench tips and high-resolution photos to johnpbisset@gmail.com. Fax to (603) 472-4944.

Author John Bisset has spent 48 years in the broadcasting industry and is still learning. He handles Western U.S. radio sales for the Telos Alliance. He is SBE certified and is a past recipient of the SBE’s Educator of the Year Award.

Author: John Bisset
Posted: November 2, 2018, 4:30 pm
A group seeking to set up FM translator stations on two islands in the western Pacific has seen their Application for Review denied. The Federal Communications Commission affirmed a decision made earlier this year by the Media Bureau to dismiss construction permit applications filed by Guam Power ...

Commission says it must follow its own strict rules when applicants miss filing deadline

A group seeking to set up FM translator stations on two islands in the western Pacific has seen their Application for Review denied.

The Federal Communications Commission affirmed a decision made earlier this year by the Media Bureau to dismiss construction permit applications filed by Guam Power II, Holonet Corp. and Management Advisory Service. The three had applied for construction permits during the January 2018 translator filing window as part of a proposal to build new cross-service FM translator stations to rebroadcast AM stations in Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands.

[Read: Alaska Licensee Surrenders FM License but Separate $8,000 Fine Remains]

In March, the bureau directed singletons of the January action (which included these applicants) to file a long-form application during a three-week window in the spring. According to the Media Bureau, the applicants failed to file that application. As a result, the bureau dismissed the applications.

In defense, the applicants filed a Petition for Reconsideration and said that the failure to file was attributable to a misunderstanding by the applicants’ engineer. The applicants also said that the AM stations are facing financial difficulties and that reinstatement of the applicants would be consistent with the commission’s policy of providing FM translators to broadcasters that do not have one in the same market.

But the Media Bureau said that the applicants were ultimately responsible for the error of their engineer. Public interest is best served by fair and consistent application of the FCC’s rules and procedures, the bureau said.

The applicants tried again in a formal Application for Review. According to the applicants, the Media Bureau did not give their waiver request a close enough look and instead made a perfunctory decision that lacked explanation. They also criticized criticizes the bureau’s “unproven assertion [that] the public interest is better served by requiring strict adherence” to commission rules.

The FCC disagreed.

The applicants failed to show that bending the rules for these three would better serve the public interest. “The commission has consistently refused to accept applications after the close of a filing window where the failure to timely file was attributed to error or poor planning by applicants’ agents,” the FCC said. “Strict deadlines are necessary to the orderly processing of this and any other application window.”

Thus the commission denied the applicants’ request for review.

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Author: Susan Ashworth
Posted: November 1, 2018, 5:56 pm
BLANTYRE, Malawi — The United Nations High Commission for the Refugees (UNHCR) has launched a community radio station at Dzaleka Refugee Camp in Malawi — the first community radio in a refugee camp in Southern Africa. Yetu, which means “ours”, is a name derived from the Swahili language, spoken ...

The station aims build co-existence between the refugee and host communities

BLANTYRE, MalawiThe United Nations High Commission for the Refugees (UNHCR) has launched a community radio station at Dzaleka Refugee Camp in Malawi — the first community radio in a refugee camp in Southern Africa.

Yetu, which means “ours”, is a name derived from the Swahili language, spoken among about 40,000 refugees at the camp, mainly from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Rwanda, Burundi, Ethiopia and Somalia.

COMMUNICATION

The UNHCR representative in Malawi, Monique Ekoko, said during the launch in August that the radio broadcasts would help build understanding between the refugee and host communities.

“The radio largely aims to build rapport with the refugee community through targeted news coverage, in-depth analysis and radio documentaries, phone-in programs as well as to foster communication and collaboration within the refugee community,” she said.

The broadcasts air in the six languages spoken at the camp — English, French, Swahili, Kirundi, Kinyarwanda and Malawi’s local language, Chichewa.

Yetu Radio, educates, informs and entertains about 40,000 refugees at Dzaleka and also people from surrounding villages in Dowa district. Besides, Yetu Radio is creating a common ground for social coexistence between refugees and Malawians through educative and entertaining programs.”

Programs popular among the listeners include; “Our culture,” “Child Expressions” and “Youth Speaks”.

The establishment of the radio operation is in a response to the initiative of two former journalists, Remy Gakwaya from Rwanda and Masumbuko Ramazani, from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

CHALLENGES

With the help of the Jesuit Refugee Service the two set up a makeshift radio station in 2013, by using the microphone and loudspeakers to inform people of any development at the camp.

The speakers were placed on the roof of the community center for broadcasts and were powered by solar panels.

But this did not last long because of lack of necessary equipment and infrastructure for the broadcasts.

However, Malawi government policy does not allow refugees to be employed in the country and are not encouraged to travel outside the camp.

Chairperson for the Yetu Radio station, Raphael Maombi Ndabaga, said this is among the challenges facing workers at the station.

“Yes we are running a radio station but we don’t have all the materials. Like recorders, as we have only one. Our studio does not have a carpet; we do not have laptops to save our data,” he said. “And a major point is that the journalists are working without earning anything and this makes them feel less motivated.”

Despite some setbacks, Ekoko said UNHCR is also planning to launch another community radio station at the Luwani Refugee Camp in Neno southern Malawi, a home to more than 3,000 refugees mainly from Mozambique.

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Author: Lameck Masina
Posted: November 1, 2018, 5:25 pm
Broadcast Music Inc., the music licensing organization, has named Michael Collins as vice president of government relations effective Monday, Nov. 5. Collins has been with the D.C. lobbying firm of Mehlman Castagnetti Rosen & Thomas. Before that, he was legislative director for Sen. Tom Udall ...

Michael Collins will be based in D.C.

Michael Collins

Broadcast Music Inc., the music licensing organization, has named Michael Collins as vice president of government relations effective Monday, Nov. 5.

Collins has been with the D.C. lobbying firm of Mehlman Castagnetti Rosen & Thomas. Before that, he was legislative director for Sen. Tom Udall (D-N.M.).

Government relations had been handled by Ann Sweeney, our SVP, international and global policy, who had been handling domestic efforts as well as overseeing international, said BMI, the latter which entails maximizing global royalties and overseeing relationships with performing rights groups abroad. "Having Michael on board now gives us a full-time presence in D.C. and allows Ann, who is based in NY, to focus fully on her international role," said a BMI spokesperson.

The move also follows the recent passage of the Music Modernization Act, which was a big focus for Sweeney domestically.

His goal will be to protect the interests of composers and publishers and comes as the Justice Department is considering lifting the consent decrees under which performance royalty organizations (PROs) like BMI collect their fees.

Justice antitrust Makan Delrahim has pointed out that the consent decrees date from decades ago and signaled it might be time to let the marketplace, rather than rate court judges, set rates for compensation.

BMI backs reviewing the decrees, created in an era of phonograph records, to reflect the digital age.

Collins will be based in Washington and report directly to BMI president Mike O'Neill.

Author: John Eggerton, Broadcasting & Cable
Posted: November 1, 2018, 4:59 pm
BALTIMORE — As a contract engineer, I work with many stations to help them to get their studios set up and workflows functioning the way that they desire. One particular project that turned out well recently was the work that I did with WRBS(FM) in Maryland. Before I came to their plant, they were ...

Baltimore broadcaster finds extreme flexibility and reliability with Axia Pathfinder Core PRO

BALTIMORE — As a contract engineer, I work with many stations to help them to get their studios set up and workflows functioning the way that they desire. One particular project that turned out well recently was the work that I did with WRBS(FM) in Maryland.

Axia xNodes and the Pathfinder Core Pro in the racks.

Before I came to their plant, they were using a standard AudioVault automation system, and in an emergency situation they had to run cables across the floor from a second studio up through the ceiling in order to patch through. When I came onboard, I was able to use a couple of Telos Alliance xNodes as well as the Axia Pathfinder system to accomplish the same thing. This facility is now almost entirely an Axia plant, and we’ve used Pathfinder Core PRO there to make the most of their remote and backup system capabilities.

Their vision was to be able to switch sources in and out seamlessly, in any situation. Most stations these days are manned by a single engineer or contract engineer, and it’s important to have flexibility built into the system in case of an emergency situation when there isn’t an engineer on site. To interact with the Pathfinder system, the Axia Element consoles in WRBS’ facility have Axia SmartSwitch modules in them and they have Axia 10 and 17 button routing control panels. The 10-switch panel is used for AM stations for switching between EAS events, different studios and audio sources. The 17-panel switch is used in the transmitter room and offers extreme flexibility by allowing WRBS to switch out any station, studio, computer, different VMixes from the Powerstations, and more. I also use Pathfinder for silence-sensing, programming timing, and in an emergency, it’s just one button to press to get a signal back on the air. When you’re in the transmitter room, you just reach up and press one button and, Bam! Back on the air. It’s a fast and elegant solution and provides the time necessary to look into solving the source of the problem.

We are also using the system with our PPM encoders so we can easily switch between them in the air chain. This also goes for any studio, AudioVault, or backup AudioVault that we want to put on the air with the push of a button. The Pathfinder virtual button panel is an extremely flexible solution for when we need to control things remotely.

The author, center, is shown with Cornelius Gould of the Telos Alliance and Peter Allen, chief engineer for WRBS.

I’ve been working with Pathfinder since the first version and it has evolved in so many ways that it’s almost impossible to wrap my mind around. As we say, “There is more than one way to skin a cat with Pathfinder Core PRO.” Axia just released a new 1RU appliance and VM version; I’m sure I’ll be working with those in the not too distant future.

Any time we’ve run up against an issue or a capability we’d like to see in the product, we take it back to Telos Support where the conversation carries back to the developer who has always been there to provide support and solutions. It’s been incredible to be part of the evolution of the product.

For information, contact Cam Eicher at the Telos Alliance in Ohio at 1-216-241-7225 or visit www.telosalliance.com.

Author: Kishore Persaud, Contract Engineer/Manager, KP Radio Broadcast Engineering
Posted: November 1, 2018, 4:30 pm
BURBANK, Calif. — Nov. 1, 2018 — The Show Technology division of LMG, a large U.S. provider of audiovisual equipment, solutions, and support, has added a Riedel Communications' Artist 64 digital matrix intercom frame and Bolero DECT-based wireless intercom to its rental equipment inventory. With a ...

The Show Technology division of LMG, a large U.S. provider of audiovisual equipment, solutions, and support, has added a Riedel Communications' Artist 64 digital matrix intercom frame and Bolero DECT-based wireless intercom to its rental equipment inventory. With a national reputation of going beyond technology to provide innovative audiovisual solutions, LMG will leverage the seamless integration of Bolero and Artist to deliver comprehensive and crystal-clear communications to productions of all sizes.

BURBANK, Calif. — Nov. 1, 2018 — The Show Technology division of LMG, a large U.S. provider of audiovisual equipment, solutions, and support, has added a Riedel Communications' Artist 64 digital matrix intercom frame and Bolero DECT-based wireless intercom to its rental equipment inventory. With a national reputation of going beyond technology to provide innovative audiovisual solutions, LMG will leverage the seamless integration of Bolero and Artist to deliver comprehensive and crystal-clear communications to productions of all sizes.

LMG will deploy its initial purchase of 10 Bolero beltpacks in stand-alone mode for smaller live events and will integrate the wireless intercom with an Artist 64 mainframe for larger corporate projects and high-profile live productions, such as awards broadcasts.

"At LMG, we're committed to offering our clients the absolute state of the art in communications solutions. We know we can count on quality products from Riedel, so it was an easy decision to bring in Bolero and an additional Artist frame," said Shane Smith, Director of Audio Services, LMG. "Our testing at Nationwide Arena convinced us that Bolero is, hands-down, the best intercom solution on the market today. It worked flawlessly, and we had absolutely no issues with dropouts or poor audio quality."

A key deciding factor for LMG's choice of Bolero was its ability to support challenging RF environments through Riedel-exclusive ADR (Advanced DECT Receiver) technology, a diversity receiver technology specifically designed to reduce sensitivity to multipath RF reflections. With more efficient use of RF spectrum, each Bolero antenna is able to support twice the number of beltpacks as other DECT-based systems.

"Bolero is an invaluable tool in our arsenal, particularly when we're faced with RF challenges in large and complex venues. Plus, customers love the sound, look, and feel of Bolero," Smith added. "We also appreciate how fast and easy it is to get up and running, even with large deployments. With Bolero's near-field communication (NFC) technology, you register a beltpack simply by touching it to the antenna. For one recent event, we were completely ready to go with 40 Bolero beltpacks in a single afternoon — a huge time savings over previous systems we've used."

Joyce Bente, President and CEO, Riedel North America, commented, "LMG is a longtime Riedel customer, and its choice of Artist and Bolero is a powerful endorsement of our communications solutions. Bolero is an ideal rental product because of its easy Artist integration and its ability to handle productions of any type and size. Add in its ease of use, robust RF performance, and great sound, and you have a winning solution for large rental houses such as LMG."

Further information about Riedel and the company's products is available at www.riedel.net.

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About Riedel Communications North America

Riedel Communications designs, manufactures, and distributes pioneering real-time video, audio, data, and communications networks for broadcast, pro audio, event, sports, theater, and security applications. Riedel is locally headquartered in Burbank, CA with its global headquarters in Wuppertal, Germany. Riedel employs over 500 people in 20 locations throughout Europe, Australia, Asia, and the Americas.

All trademarks appearing herein are the property of their respective owners.

Link to Word Doc: www.wallstcom.com/Riedel/181101Riedel.docx

Photo Link: www.wallstcom.com/Riedel/Riedel_LMG-Bolero-Images.zip

Description of Photos: LMG has added Riedel's Bolero and Artist to its rental portfolio.

 

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Author: Dundee Hills Group
Posted: November 1, 2018, 2:22 pm